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-   -   What is going on here? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/what-going-here-133078/)

Alan 02-08-2012 08:13 PM

What is going on here?
 
3 Attachment(s)
I discovered this last night as I was looking at the wall opening, and I decided it looked a little bowed. I banged the top plates off of the studs with a 3lb sledge until it was level and this is what i was left with.

I checked level on the joists for the 2nd floor with a 3' level, and they are REALLY close.

I checked level on the wall supporting the 2nd floor joists (this is the perpendicular wall you can see in the photo) between the studs and it's about as exact as I can measure. with a short level anyway.


I put my 3' level on the floor and it looks like it's out about as much as the gap in the wall.

It seems odd to me that i'd have a sag in the floor here on the first floor, but all second floor joists seem pretty good.

I haven't crawled under the house to look specifically at this yet, but last time I was under there everything seemed ok.
Any ideas :eek: ?

Alan 02-08-2012 08:14 PM

first picture is the wall i had to bang apart

second picture is the floor

third picture is the floor joist for the second floor

titanoman 02-08-2012 08:19 PM

Don't understand the problem or the question.

Alan 02-08-2012 08:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by titanoman (Post 848178)
Don't understand the problem or the question.

Top plates on the wall in the first picture are separated by nearly a half inch and the top plates now read level. They do not align with the wall perpendicular to them at all.

The floor shows out of level also, close to but not quite as far out as the top plate of the wall is.

The second floor joists show very very close to level, so I don't think that the entire system could be sagging in this case.

Why would the floor read out of level, and the top plate of the wall in the same area read out of level, but not the joists on the second floor that are being supported by a wall that is sitting near where the first floor appears to be sagging?

Ironlight 02-08-2012 09:15 PM

Because it's not a load bearing wall?

Alan 02-08-2012 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironlight (Post 848243)
Because it's not a load bearing wall?

It definitely is


.

titanoman 02-08-2012 10:00 PM

A 3' level really is pretty inaccurate for this. A hump here or a bow there might be isolated right in that area, but over the distance might be an entirely different story.
Hard to say without being there.

abracaboom 02-08-2012 11:47 PM

Measure that stud. If it is shorter than the others, just shim it. If it is the same length, your floor is dipping at that spot, and you might want to get in the crawlspace and see if you can shim a joist to get rid of the dip.

WillK 02-09-2012 09:04 AM

Could this be some sort of seasonal expansion or contraction of wood due to changes in moisture, kind of like something buildingscience.com gets into in their article with a title something like "wood is good, but strange"?

Alan 02-09-2012 09:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by abracaboom (Post 848397)
Measure that stud. If it is shorter than the others, just shim it. If it is the same length, your floor is dipping at that spot, and you might want to get in the crawlspace and see if you can shim a joist to get rid of the dip.

Now that you mention that :

Floor system is post and beam with t&g 2x6 on top. No joists in between them. I may have to get some 2x6's and some hangers in between the beams in this area then.

The wall bearing the upstairs load is sitting on top of the center beam in the floor system, and the low spot in the floor is right in front of that beam

Alan 10-25-2012 07:48 PM

I'm still trying to wrap my mind around how I am going to deal with this.

What size level should I have in order to more accurately check the framing?

I know the floor has a sag in it, so i'm contemplating cutting a hole in it, framing some 2x8 joists in between the 4x8 beams, and covering it with doubled up 3/4" plywood to match the 1.5" T&G subfloor material that's there now.


However, that doesn't fix the problem of the top plates not lining up with one another.

hand drive 10-25-2012 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alan (Post 1038019)
I'm still trying to wrap my mind around how I am going to deal with this.

What size level should I have in order to more accurately check the framing?

I know the floor has a sag in it, so i'm contemplating cutting a hole in it, framing some 2x8 joists in between the 4x8 beams, and covering it with doubled up 3/4" plywood to match the 1.5" T&G subfloor material that's there now.


However, that doesn't fix the problem of the top plates not lining up with one another.


A straight 2x4 can be used as a level extender, cut the 2x to the length needed and place your 3' level against the 2x and read the bubble...

oh'mike 10-26-2012 09:51 AM

Could you take a picture of that wall from further back?

Obvious to me that that wall isn't carrying much weight--if any----the floor above----is it sagging or humped?

A shot of the floor framing in the area of the wall would help------

BigJim 10-26-2012 10:05 AM

The problem must not be getting any worse after 10 months, it is still as it was. Does that area have any bounce to it, is there any squeaking in that area? If it were mine I would shim from the floor up or just shim on top of the studs, same difference. There must not be any pressure at the point where the plate is raised up off the studs. If you can, get someone to bounce hard at that point to see if there is any movement.

oh'mike 10-26-2012 11:03 AM

Jim,I'm glad you are looking in on this one----Alan is a friend and could use a bit of your expertise---


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