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-   -   Wet sponge for sanding.....good? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/wet-sponge-sanding-good-18113/)

yummy mummy 03-06-2008 08:04 PM

Wet sponge for sanding.....good?
 
I have purchased a sponge with one side that is rough, to do my sanding for when I start taping my drywall.

I have never done any taping before, and was wondering if I could use a wet sponge for all my sanding, so that I won't have any drywall dust?

Or should I stick with regular sandpaper?

Does the wet sponge work as well as the regular sandpaper?


Thanks

AtlanticWBConst. 03-06-2008 08:41 PM

Wet sponges are an enigma. The whole concept for using such a thing to do drywall is quite ridiculous. (IMHO)

In the professional trades, the common sanding tools are:

- A Rotary sander with a vac attachment (we have 2 PC's) Rentable in some locals, but very difficult to master. Inexperienced users will leave circular marks everywhere they run the sander.
- A sanding pole (very difficult for a newbi to master without putting some deep gashes in the finished drywall)
- A sanding sponge.

For a newbi DIYer, I recommend the sanding sponge. Yes it takes a while, but it's really a "tool" that you can't miss-use.

My DIY recommendation: Stick with a sanding sponge.

yummy mummy 03-06-2008 09:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 104972)
Wet sponges are an enigma. The whole concept for using such a thing to do drywall is quite ridiculous. (IMHO)

In the professional trades, the common sanding tools are:

- A Rotary sander with a vac attachment (we have 2 PC's) Rentable in some locals, but very difficult to master. Inexperienced users will leave circular marks everywhere they run the sander.
- A sanding pole (very difficult for a newbi to master without putting some deep gashes in the finished drywall)
- A sanding sponge.

For a newbi DIYer, I recommend the sanding sponge. Yes it takes a while, but it's really a "tool" that you can't miss-us




My DIY recommendation: Stick with a sanding sponge.

Thanks Atlantic.

So I will return my wet sponge and get a sanding sponge.

Is there a particular one that I would use?
In terms of a fine or coarse one?


Thanks again

AtlanticWBConst. 03-06-2008 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 104984)
Is there a particular one that I would use?
In terms of a fine or coarse one?

There are different sanding sponges out there. What you want is the kind that is specifically for drywall (a "drywall" sanding sponge).

A "drywall sanding sponge" will have a course (sanding) side and a fine (sanding side) to it (on the same sponge)....

yummy mummy 03-06-2008 10:33 PM

Thanks Atlantic.

I'm really going to hate the dust. :yes:

Everytime, I cut a piece of drywall and there is drywall dust, particles on the floor, I wash the whole floor, because I can't stand the dust everywhere. I have the cleanest cement floor around. :laughing:

I have heard that there is a type of vacuum cleaner nozzle that I can use to minimize the dust. I wonder if it works.

Ron6519 03-07-2008 12:08 AM

The reason you don't want a wet sponge to remove the excess compound is that it will raise the grain on the paper of the drywall and make it rough when you paint.
There is a low cost tool(around $40.00) that Home Depot sells that will eliminate most of the dust from drywall compound sanding. You'll find it in the sheetrock aisle. It's basically a 5 gal pail with a sander attachment that hooks up to your wet vac. You fill the pail with water and attach the hose to the vacuum and the sander. As you sand the dust gets deposited into the water bucket and doesn't clog the vacuum filter. The sander uses open mesh grit sheets that allows the vacumm to suck the particles into the pail. Grits vary 150 or 220. The 220 grit will minimize swirl marks on the wall. There is a pole accessory that you can use on the ceiling without the use of a ladder.
This tool is a variation of a much more expensive drywall sander the pro's use.
Ron

James Con 03-07-2008 01:26 AM

I use this Home Depot version it works pretty good. It's actually about a three gallon pail, 12 feet of hose and the sanding head. I actually took all the fittings off the three gallon pail and fit them to a five gallon pail, and bought twelve more feet of hose this way you can sand longer between cleanings and the longer hose is good so you don't have to move the bucket and vac around too much. Home D has the hose also. Just be careful not to let the vac suc too hard or it will mess your mud job up.

AtlanticWBConst. 03-07-2008 04:58 AM

The problem with those systems is the screen sanding pad. You will never see those screen sanding pads used professionally (by the pros), because they cannot achieve the type of smooth-sanded-finish that a solid sanding material will do. The screens, because of their grid-patterns, tend to leave minute lines on the sanded surface.

James Con 03-10-2008 01:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 105040)
The problem with those systems is the screen sanding pad. You will never see those screen sanding pads used professionally (by the pros), because they cannot achieve the type of smooth-sanded-finish that a solid sanding material will do. The screens, because of their grid-patterns, tend to leave minute lines on the sanded surface.

The screens work better if they are worn. I usually use it on a piece of metal round bar to fine up the mesh. It works for me. Also I had to drill another hole in the hose fitting to relieve some of the suction, You don't want the the pad handle to vacuum it self to the wall. Ya just need a little suction. Otherwise, Yes it will dig in. Not that I am a (Pro) but I worked with finishers that did not need to sand the whole job just spot sand. That's how you know your good,No power sanders.

End Grain 03-10-2008 02:41 AM

I use the wet drywall sponge when I have to do very minor repairs in drywall and I don't want to make any dust. A lot of homes I go into will have artwork, sculptures, etc. and the repair may be just a few feet away from one such piece. Although I try to make my initial patch as smooth as is possible, a light go over is warranted to make sure it's perfectly smooth with the surrounding wall. The wet sponge helps control the dust and it also helps to make a very smooth finish without scuffing up the painted wall around the patch. Again, I'm talking NO TAPE and very small repairs.

Sanding down tape and joint jobs is best done with the drywall sanding blocks and a good vacuum with a drywall dust filter or bag or the MagnaKleen Turkish hookah sanding rig that HD sells and that several posters already mentioned. I've had one of the rigs for several years and it does contain about 85% of the dust. It uses screens and you will have to use at least two grades, i.e. fine and extra fine. Otherwise, as another poster stated, you'll get very noticeable sanding lines throughout. I like the sanding sponges because I can rinse them out when they get loaded up with drywall dust.

Just remember that the quickest way to ruin a perfectly good shop vacuum is to suck up drywall sanding dust without a drywall dust filter or bag in place.

AtlanticWBConst. 03-10-2008 07:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by End Grain (Post 106031)
.....Just remember that the quickest way to ruin a perfectly good shop vacuum is to suck up drywall sanding dust without a drywall dust filter or bag in place.

That allegedly, is the claim that is made by alot of manufactures of power sanders, as well as others. They claim that the drywall dust will burn out and damage the machine's vacuum parts, because the drywall dust is more abrasive than normal dust particles. Thus, they insist, that you "need to" purchase their more expensive drywall dust filters, or their specially made drywall-vacs.

Now, that I have listed that, I'd like to say this: We have been using regular old shop vacs, with regular old standard filters for all our drywall clean ups for a VERY long time.
We have even been using the same standard set ups, attached to our PC power sanders.
(We have about 10+ shop vacs) All these vacs, with regular, plain old filters, still work perfectly, the oldest one is about 10 years old.

Now, I'm not saying that the cautionary warnings of using drywall vacs, and drywall filters is wrong, and that everyone should disregard them ... I am simply saying that it's something to think about...

End Grain 03-10-2008 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 106045)
That allegedly, is the claim that is made by alot of manufactures of power sanders, as well as others. They claim that the drywall dust will burn out and damage the machine's vacuum parts, because the drywall dust is more abrasive than normal dust particles. Thus, they insist, that you "need to" purchase their more expensive drywall dust filters, or their specially made drywall-vacs.

Now, that I have listed that, I'd like to say this: We have been using regular old shop vacs, with regular old standard filters for all our drywall clean ups for a VERY long time.
We have even been using the same standard set ups, attached to our PC power sanders.
(We have about 10+ shop vacs) All these vacs, with regular, plain old filters, still work perfectly, the oldest one is about 10 years old.

Now, I'm not saying that the cautionary warnings of using drywall vacs, and drywall filters is wrong, and that everyone should disregard them ... I am simply saying that it's something to think about...


You may be right but for the average DIY-er and homeowner, it's probably not prudent to save a few bucks on the front end and risk ruining a perfectly good shop vac on the back end. Even if it survives, my guess is that the warranty will be voided. When one is in business and using tools and equipment everyday, replacing them is a deductible business expense. Alas, not so for the DIY-er. :(

Brik 03-10-2008 11:12 AM

I'll add my 2 cents as a DIYer and also going to be sanding about 4 sheets worth of seams, two outside corners and once ceiling/wall inside corner.

First - I try to get as close to finished smoothness as I can in the application of the mud.
Second - I used both the screen and the sponge plus also one of those little squishy sanding blocks.

First I start with my mud knife and knock of any ridges, lumps, splatters, etc. Then I will use the sanding screen to knock off any high spots. I try not to use the screen on the drywall paper itself for fear of scuffing it up. I will use the sanding block at this stage also.


I then use the wet sanding method to feather everything out and do my final sanding. If I have any voids, holes or divots I will just use a little bit more mud to fill instead of sanding down even further. It means coming back again after the mud has set up but this too cuts down on sanding.

The upside to my approach - I get a great finish, not nearly as much dust as sanding alone.
The downside to my approach - It takes longer than a pro, it leaves a little dust, is faster than wet sanding alone.

Bpawb 03-21-2008 12:25 AM

These things work great ---> http://www.fullcircleinternational.com/radius360.html

You may find them at your local drywall or paint supply house

kgphoto 03-21-2008 01:38 AM

The newer sanding poles have a lower center of gravity on their pivot so they are harder to tip over and dent the wall. Screens work great, IF you don't push hard. Use the finer one. They don't clog and last longer than paper.

I prefer to make my walls smooth with an extra coat rather than have much to sand. Pole sander for a quick overall and then the big sanding sponge(dry) to touch up and do the corners.


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