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Old 05-02-2008, 08:26 AM   #16
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Waterproofing Basement


Ok.. here is what I have.

The grade around the house is sloped away.

I do have gutters, only one downspout off the garage, the main roofline is higher than the garage so I just emptied the main roofline into the garage gutters to carry the water away from the house.

I have some black junk on the exterior of the foundation just above grade level. I assume that is waterproofing.

I have tile drains all the way around the house that feed into a sump basin in the basement that drains about 60 feet behind the house.

All that said I still get "sweaty" joints.

So from what I've read on this thread it's pointless for me to "drylock" the basement before I put a bedroom? If that's the case what do I do? I'm not digging out the foundation, don't have the time or money for that. Should I put some vapor barrier between the bedroom walls and the basement walls and call it good or what?

I'm in upstate NY so we get a lot of water up here.
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Old 05-02-2008, 08:41 AM   #17
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Waterproofing Basement


SnowUtopia -

You said you have a 10 month old home. Because of that, you have no history on the performance of the basement walls or how the site handles or supplies water. Because of that, you should do as much as you can to protect you investment in finishing the area.

What I suggested is not a paint like the Drylok stuff. It is a time proven cement based coating that has be used in concrete restoration, maintenance and as a base for other coatings.

Unfortunately, you did not mention where you are located. Ten months of concrete curing does not provide complete curing and small shrinkage cracks can occur later, especially in poured walls. Also it is good to have a coating over the steel that connected the wall forms.

I would also take a look at the joint between the wall and floor. Exterior waterproofing does nothing to prevent leakage at thet site. Water can enter from below since the slab is just sitting on the footings. As the concrete cures, the slab will pull away from the wall. This joint is commonly filled with hydraulic cement forced into an opened up joint area.

You said you have a sump but no mention was made whether is was a local sump or connected to a drain tile system. Drain tile (especially interior tile) will greatly reduce the amount of water that can be immediately under the slab and could enter at the slab wall joint.

The suggestion of a 4' downspout extension may help in some areas. If you look at your house and imagine how wide the excavation was for working space and access, you would realize that an 8' is far more effective. An access ramp for construction or utility trenches can also bring in moisture. Because of these factors, an interior coating is a good investment.

Last edited by concretemasonry; 05-02-2008 at 08:43 AM.
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Old 05-02-2008, 01:50 PM   #18
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Waterproofing Basement


If your walls have only been damproofed it will not resist hydrostatic pressure. I dont' understand why people do this. If its my house, Im going to have a real below grade waterproofing (sheet or coating) which will resist hydrostatic pressure. You need to check the label to make sure it is for negative waterproofing which is what you are doing when you put in on the inside. A was said before thoroseal or bonsal foundation coating are both good negative side waterproofings. I dont like just having hydraulic cement at the cove joint. I would also suggest a cant bead of a 2 part polyurethane sealant. before you apply the negative waterproofing
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Old 05-02-2008, 07:39 PM   #19
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Waterproofing Basement


The spayed on black stuff is easily scared and damaged during the backfill process. Waterproofing sheets placed in front of it are the second line of protection. The first being proper curtain drains to carry the water away , thus relieving hydrostatic pressure.

Webweaver, Code most likely required the curtain drains so most likely you do have them.

In my opinion, If you do nothing the seepage will continue and when you put up your walls you have a nice dark place for mold to form. If you have young children they could be susceptible to several respiratory problems due to allergic reactions.

At best you will get a dank musty smell that will prove very hard to get rid of.

In your case a negative water proofer as suggested by others on this site will work if properly applied. Thorseal, Bonsal, and Pro-Seal DP36 are tailor made for problems like yours. If you are concerned about the cinder block breathing leave the top row of blocks uncoated.

Last edited by Docfletcher; 05-02-2008 at 07:51 PM.
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Old 05-02-2008, 08:31 PM   #20
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Waterproofing Basement


Thanks for all the responses everyone.

I finally got some rain and some time to take pics of exactly what I'm refering to. See the link below.

http://picasaweb.google.com/david.ke...ey=7hddPUqCRCQ
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Old 05-03-2008, 09:23 AM   #21
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Waterproofing Basement


Webweaver, It looks like lateral water seepage. Consider Pro-Seal 36 as it is a clear natural finish, leaves no film or membrane on the surface. If you wish it can be top coated with Thoroseal, or Bonsal.

After you apply pro seal 36 you may wish to use PPW, it is a paste that can be rubbed into the hairline cracks shown in your photos.
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