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Old 08-07-2010, 05:34 PM   #16
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Water coming in at base of foundation


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Originally Posted by benjamincall View Post
So, what sort of solution would you put in as a fail-safe solution to augment the exterior perimeter drain and gravel?
Are you asking what I intend to do or just in general? I might do something like this http://dry-up-basement.com/basement-dry-up-system.html, just to get water out of the finished room and into the room with the drain. Also I would use carpet tile or some other sort flooring that can handle getting a little wet and is removeable. I haven't seen anywhere near the quantities of water that would justify jackhammering a hole in the floor to install a sump.

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Old 08-07-2010, 10:07 PM   #17
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Water coming in at base of foundation


I'm looking for the best permanent solution. That's an interesting molding/drain product.

Digging down to your footing to put in the drain tile shouldn't be that big a deal. A little hard labor is better than living with carpet tile any day.
DriCore is expensive, but you could use it to channel water under the floor if your'e not confident you've solved the root problem.

I'm putting down 1-1/2" foam insulation on the floor.
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Old 08-08-2010, 03:14 PM   #18
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Water coming in at base of foundation


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Digging down to your footing to put in the drain tile shouldn't be that big a deal. A little hard labor is better than living with carpet tile any day.
Heh, heh. Sounds like a lot of hard labor to me. I'm not even sure how one would do that without renting a backhoe or something like that. I can't imagine digging all the way down to the base by hand.

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DriCore is expensive, but you could use it to channel water under the floor if your'e not confident you've solved the root problem.
It's funny you mention dricore. There was a bunch of it down there when I moved in but I gave it away to the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store. I'm drawing a line at any solutions that decrease headroom, There's only around 6-1/2' of it as is.

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I'm putting down 1-1/2" foam insulation on the floor.
Interesting idea. My floor gets cold as sin in the winter. But again the headroom thing.
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Old 08-08-2010, 06:48 PM   #19
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Water coming in at base of foundation


Two words: Backhoe Contractor.

The "best" place to deal with water problems is on the outside. Dig the earth away and you can do all kinds of fixes: tar and membrane the foundation walls, XPS foam over that, then weeping tile and crushed stone.

The waterproofing will help keep things dry, and the insulation will keep it even dryer, because you'll keep the foundation walls warmer and they'll be far less likely to condense water from the air. Put an inch or two of blueboard or pinkboard between the earth and anything you care about, and it goes a long way to helping things.

JMO
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Old 08-08-2010, 08:38 PM   #20
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Water coming in at base of foundation


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Two words: Backhoe Contractor.

The "best" place to deal with water problems is on the outside. Dig the earth away and you can do all kinds of fixes: tar and membrane the foundation walls, XPS foam over that, then weeping tile and crushed stone.

The waterproofing will help keep things dry, and the insulation will keep it even dryer, because you'll keep the foundation walls warmer and they'll be far less likely to condense water from the air. Put an inch or two of blueboard or pinkboard between the earth and anything you care about, and it goes a long way to helping things.

JMO

The only problem with that is that he already has current issues inside with the water level. The outside work is definatley a great idea, but it really has to be tied together with an inside sytem to work properly. You can "damproof" the exterior and definately install exterior draintile & stone, but the tile need to empty somewhere, which is most often into the interior draintile, and then to the sump, in which in both cases he doesn't currently have.



OP: I'd be aprehensive about the "cove moulding solution" in the link that you posted. It's fundamental flaw is that is retains the water level/table far higher than it should be. In reality, water can easily present itself at low spots in the floor (in cracks or joints) as well as penetrations like your column posts, long before the cove sytem ever see's the water.
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Old 08-09-2010, 11:28 AM   #21
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Water coming in at base of foundation


I appreciate all the replies. We had 1.3" of rain last night and no water. I think I'll start keeping track of rainfall just to get an idea of just how much it takes to start seeing signs of water. Right now I'm starting to think the reasonable thing to do is redo the patio and the grade away from the house and wait a year or so. If that seems to make the water problems go away, then I can finish the basement. If it doesn't, I can decide then if more drastic measures are required or if I should just live with it.

Is there anything a little less drastic than digging down to the base of the foundation that could be done at the same time as the patio/grading that could help? Perhaps installing drain tile just below the surface... or is that a waste of time?

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The only problem with that is that he already has current issues inside with the water level. The outside work is definatley a great idea, but it really has to be tied together with an inside sytem to work properly. You can "damproof" the exterior and definately install exterior draintile & stone, but the tile need to empty somewhere, which is most often into the interior draintile, and then to the sump, in which in both cases he doesn't currently have.
I suppose I could see doing all the outside work if that was the end of it. (It's kind of tempting just from the perspective of getting to put some insulation on those walls) but man, that's a lot of work and money if it only gets you halfway there. The best I could do anyway is of the way around the house, unless I jackhammer up my driveway.


Quote:
OP: I'd be aprehensive about the "cove moulding solution" in the link that you posted. It's fundamental flaw is that is retains the water level/table far higher than it should be. In reality, water can easily present itself at low spots in the floor (in cracks or joints) as well as penetrations like your column posts, long before the cove sytem ever see's the water.
I see your point. Well, it was just an idea for a failsafe. The post where water comes up is in the "unfinished" room and only about 4' away from the drain so it's not a major concern. Perhaps this method is more effective when the problem is water coming through defects in the wall rather than at the base of the foundation.
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Old 08-09-2010, 09:24 PM   #22
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Water coming in at base of foundation


You are correct, the exterior excavation is a TON of work, as well as a mess. You're thinking in the right direction by addressing the outside grade first, start with the simplest solutions and go from there. Before I'd suggest the exterior excav. work, just due to the info you gave, I'd probably opt for the interior draintile. That would include sawing & removing a ribbon of floor around the perimeter o fthe basement, & tieing into a crock. This site should give you some background on what that involves:

http://www.mtidry.com/basement/
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Old 08-09-2010, 09:51 PM   #23
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Water coming in at base of foundation


Don't forget that there is a post inside the basement that was water around the base. This indicates that the water table is now higher due to the weather, exterior drain tile clogging or a general problem in the area. Waterproofing an exterior wall will not stop the interior post leakage since the water is coming from below and not from wall leakage, which is also the first guess.

Dick

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