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Old 12-30-2011, 11:20 AM   #1
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


Hi!

New to the forum..

I’m installing split face stones on one ENTIRE WALL.. the size of the wall is 12’x9’.
Each sheet(19.75” x 7.5”) weighs about 10lb.. so the entire wall has to hold about 1000lb the total weight of stones..

My question is.. is this safe? Will my wall hold this kind of weight? A guy at the tile shop was saying he’s seen a wall that is about 200 s.f. with this type of stones..

My other question is, is it necessary to replace my drywall to cement board? or will my drywall hold?

The house is newly built.. the joists run parallel to the wall..

Something like these.. my stones are a lot smaller..
http://www.houzz.com/photos/92216/re...m-other-metros
http://www.houzz.com/photos/22935/fi...-san-francisco

happy holiday!!


Last edited by zzeuss; 12-30-2011 at 11:28 AM.
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Old 12-30-2011, 02:35 PM   #2
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


I don't have an exact answer for you....but at least your asking an intelligent question....

I do know that the one thing some of the experts here are going to ask.....what is below that wall? In other words, what is the wall sitting on? That will be a big factor.

Also note, just because the tile guy says he has seen it done....it does not mean it is right.

With that said....to my feeble knowledge....a typical floor is rated at 10 lbs/sq ft dead load (furniture) and 40 lbs live load (people). So if nothing is against that wall....we could assume that you have 120lbs of dead load available.....a little shy of 1000 lbs.

Yea.....some of the experts are going to have to chime in.....but I'm following this one....interesting problem.

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Old 12-30-2011, 03:08 PM   #3
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


The floor won't have anything to do with it if the stone is going on an exterior wall. The floor does not support the stone. The stone will be supported by the stone adhesive and only "shear-factors" come into play.

Assuming by the stated dimensions the wall is nine feet tall and twelve feet wide it won't be a problem at all, but what could be an issue is applying the adhesive to painted drywall in this case. I would rather see new cement board attached to the studs and screwed approximately every six inches. This way the thinset adhesive has full opportunity to attach itself to the cement board.

The wall structure will carry the load and if it is an exterior wall that wall will be resting substantially on substructure, shouldn't be a problem.

If this is an interior wall one should take a close look at what is immediately below the wall-frame structure itself.

I have installed stone on interior walls a lot higher than nine to twelve feet without any issues and with the blessings of the architect or engineer on the job.
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Old 12-30-2011, 08:15 PM   #4
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


Thank you very much for your input!!!

Wow.. this is not going to be an easy task I assume...

This photo was taken before the drywalls were up..
the room behind is a sunken laundry room..


this is where I want all my tiles.

the wall sits where the PVC pipe is going across.. right between the last floor joist and the sunken area.

The last floor joist - one end is supported by the I-beam and the other end is support by the foundation of the house..

Am I safe??
Do I still need to put up a brand new cement wall??
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:36 PM   #5
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


The joist-bay appears to be a short one and that's a good thing. So I don't see a problem with the weight.

The bigger problem is the painted drywall. Paint is a known bond-breaker when it comes to thinset which would be my installation approach of choice
(on cement board) but in this case if you don't want to trouble yourself installing cement board then maybe you should go to the more costly and time-consuming method of using roofing felt, expanded mesh sufficiently fastened to the studs thru the unreliable drywall, and then a masonry scratch-coat. And then Type S to install the stones.

That's all I've got.
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:59 PM   #6
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


Who has glasses? Too many issues to point out.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:15 PM   #7
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Who has glasses? Too many issues to point out.
can you point them out??
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:18 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
The joist-bay appears to be a short one and that's a good thing. So I don't see a problem with the weight.

The bigger problem is the painted drywall. Paint is a known bond-breaker when it comes to thinset which would be my installation approach of choice
(on cement board) but in this case if you don't want to trouble yourself installing cement board then maybe you should go to the more costly and time-consuming method of using roofing felt, expanded mesh sufficiently fastened to the studs thru the unreliable drywall, and then a masonry scratch-coat. And then Type S to install the stones.

That's all I've got.
thanks Bud, I'll probably go with cement board...
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:29 PM   #9
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


Something just occurred to me. I am assuming the studs in the intended wall are spaced at 16" o.c.
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Old 12-30-2011, 11:43 PM   #10
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Something just occurred to me. I am assuming the studs in the intended wall are spaced at 16" o.c.
yes.. 16" apart.. is that a problem?? thought that's the standard.. at least here in Canada..

Last edited by zzeuss; 12-30-2011 at 11:54 PM.
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Old 12-31-2011, 12:07 AM   #11
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


A question I have is "Why the visqueen, esp in a basement?" Is that code, or otherwise mandated? Might you ever run an air conditioner? Be real careful using visqueen, esp in areas of moderate temps.
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Old 12-31-2011, 01:01 AM   #12
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Quote:
yes.. 16" apart.. is that a problem?? thought that's the standard.. at least here in Canada..
That's a good thing. I was afraid the spacing may have been 24" o.c., maybe that wouldn't be as good.
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Old 12-31-2011, 05:19 AM   #13
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


I'm not a tile guy, but I think you could just screw (into the studs) 1/4" thick cement board over the drywall, with some construction adhesive for good measure. That way you don't have to bother pulling out the drywall.
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Old 12-31-2011, 09:28 AM   #14
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


Construction adhesive on cement board would have very little to no effect as a bonding agent. If all the edges can be addressed suitably cement board over drywall should be do-able if proper fasteners and fastening schedule is used.
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Old 12-31-2011, 09:50 AM   #15
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Wall Tiling - How heavy it can hold


At this point the room has nothing in it, just cut the drywall out and attach the cement board to the studs. Use a straight edge and make clean cuts, overlap the last peice of stone and your edge will look great.
I hope this is clear.

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