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Old 08-17-2010, 12:43 PM   #1
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Wall Help!


I am hoping someone can help me!

I live in a 2 family duplex in Massachusetts that was built in 1897. We have a stone foundation and wood frame construction. An inspector we hired showed us that our exterior wall is bowing quite a bit. However, he was not sure why. He also asked a friend of his who is an engineer, and he was also not certain. There was an addition made to the back of the building at some point in the past 100 years, which can be seen as the bowing is more obvious on the exterior wall of the addition.

I am trying to figure out if this is structural or just "an ugly look" issue, and what it may be due to. The "bowing" looks like it may stem from the addition. Any help would be great!

Thanks!

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Old 08-17-2010, 12:53 PM   #2
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Wall Help!


two things about your wall .If it is bowed from top to bottom,it is probably the way it dried,but if it is on the length of the wall, its probably that when they put the foundation. it was not square whit the rest of the house ?

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Old 08-17-2010, 01:20 PM   #3
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Wall Help!


Thanks.

It bows along the length as opposed to up and down.

It's been like this evidently for a very long time. Just trying to figure it out. If the foundation wasn't square and therefore the walls are bowing, do you think there is any issue as far as collapse or will it just look bad.

Thanks again!
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Old 08-17-2010, 01:23 PM   #4
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Wall Help!


Do you know if the home was built with "balloon framing" or was it built using "platform framing"?

Does the roof ridge show any signs of sagging?
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Old 08-17-2010, 01:29 PM   #5
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No real sagging on the roof ridge that I can make out (Actually - I take that back. I am not 100% certain if there is. It may do so slightly - nothing too signficant if it does).

As far as the balloon framing versus platform framing, most likely balloon framing. Thoughts? Thanks again.

Last edited by Woodframe; 08-17-2010 at 01:33 PM.
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Old 08-17-2010, 01:42 PM   #6
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Wall Help!


I'm trying to find some resources for you to check that may help you out. I'll check back later when I get some time.

For now here is a link to a thread someone else started a few years ago that sounds similar to your situation.

Roof Sagging wall bowing

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