Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-25-2008, 11:20 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


The entire garage measures 28x28 and the previous owner started to make a living area out of the upper part of the garage. He built a great set of stairs to get up there and has only laid two sheets of 1/4" (flimsy) OSB across the floor joists. Easy enough to pull up. The rest of the joists are exposed.

If you take into account the pitch of the roof over the garage, the total living space in the upstairs is about 26'x15', with the joists running the shorter way.

My question is this: All of these joists, garage ceiling and floor are 24" OC. I told my husband that I'm sure we'll have to sister the floor joists if there is going to be a bedroom up there to hold the weight. He doesn't believe we'll have to make any other arrangements. I can't believe that 24" joists will hold that weight. What would be the best way to assure that our joists will hold his bed and furniture and that room will still be functional after he's gone and more importantly, pass code??

What do you all think?

ozzwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2008, 11:43 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 92
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


Quote:
Originally Posted by ozzwood View Post
All of these joists, garage ceiling and floor are 24" OC. I told my husband that I'm sure we'll have to sister the floor joists if there is going to be a bedroom up there to hold the weight. He doesn't believe we'll have to make any other arrangements. I can't believe that 24" joists will hold that weight. What would be the best way to assure that our joists will hold his bed and furniture and that room will still be functional after he's gone and more importantly, pass code??
The 24" OC is a concern but is there enough ventilation/insulation to make the room comfortable? Typically space above the garage is potential storage space for things we really don't need anymore. The type of joist used for the garage may dictate whether the space can be used.

aggreX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 12:15 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


Quote:
Originally Posted by aggreX View Post
The 24" OC is a concern but is there enough ventilation/insulation to make the room comfortable? Typically space above the garage is potential storage space for things we really don't need anymore. The type of joist used for the garage may dictate whether the space can be used.
We've put in R-30 all around. It's actually rather toasty up there. The previous owners intention was to make a small studio apartment there. We're just trying to finish it off, but... just wonderin' about those joists.
ozzwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 09:16 AM   #4
Drywall contractor
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lilburn, GA
Posts: 2,094
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


I'm not an expert on framing or codes, but I would think you are correct that you need additional framing. I'm sure others with more knowledge will weigh in. First off, what are the joists (2" x ?)?? Is there a bond beam running through the middle? Typically a garage is not framed with the intention of having a living space above, but you MAY be ok. Check fire code too. You may need fire rated drywall on the ceiling (at least) below. It's probably 1/2" now.
__________________
If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you can read this in English, thank a soldier. Support our troops.
bjbatlanta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 09:46 AM   #5
Eibwen
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Virginia Beach, Va
Posts: 849
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


I would get a structural engineer to come in and evaluate it and give you a cert for a few hundred bucks. You may even need the cert to get your permit.

The original builder may not not have intended the area above the garage to be a living space.. Just storage.

That size space with no supporting beams below and 24" oc would make me awful wary.
Sammy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:12 AM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


Quote:
Originally Posted by bjbatlanta View Post
I'm not an expert on framing or codes, but I would think you are correct that you need additional framing. I'm sure others with more knowledge will weigh in. First off, what are the joists (2" x ?)?? Is there a bond beam running through the middle? Typically a garage is not framed with the intention of having a living space above, but you MAY be ok. Check fire code too. You may need fire rated drywall on the ceiling (at least) below. It's probably 1/2" now.
Sorry, the joists are 2x6's . No, there isn't a beam running through the middle.

Thanks for the advice on the fire code, as well.
ozzwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:14 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy View Post
I would get a structural engineer to come in and evaluate it and give you a cert for a few hundred bucks. You may even need the cert to get your permit.

The original builder may not not have intended the area above the garage to be a living space.. Just storage.

That size space with no supporting beams below and 24" oc would make me awful wary.
Hi Sammy, and thanks. Yeah, I'm thinking I need an engineer to come in and take a look is in order, too.

The original owner of the garage said he had it built to have it used as a living space. We'll see.
ozzwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:18 AM   #8
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


yeah.... ummm.....living space???

1/4" OSB + 24" OC joists = ambulance

lol

DM
DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:24 AM   #9
BUILDER / REMODELING CONT
 
buletbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: LONG ISLAND N.Y
Posts: 1,543
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


28' span with 2x6's @ 24" on center. no good.
buletbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:28 AM   #10
Drywall contractor
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Lilburn, GA
Posts: 2,094
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


Yeah, 28' span and no type of beam in the middle says it's not meant to be a living space above. As stated, I'm not a framing pro, but I've covered up a lot of framing and have some idea what it takes. I'm sure what you're considering is plausible, but it may involve a bit more than your husband thought. The original owner may have paid someone to frame it for future occupancy above, but probably didn't have a clue what to look for. Likely didn't get a permit or have inspections.........
__________________
If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you can read this in English, thank a soldier. Support our troops.
bjbatlanta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:37 AM   #11
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...




DM
DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:48 AM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


Quote:
Originally Posted by buletbob View Post
28' span with 2x6's @ 24" on center. no good.
This is exactly what I thought. Seriously.

Thanks everyone for your thoughts. I think I'm gonna have someone take a look at it and see exactly what it's gonna need to be finished instead of taking shortcuts like my husband would like.

As DM said, this is just an ambulance waiting to happen.
ozzwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:56 AM   #13
BUILDER / REMODELING CONT
 
buletbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: LONG ISLAND N.Y
Posts: 1,543
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


you would need to consult with an engineer to calculate the floor system. you will have to plane on putting in a dropped header down the center of the garage in order to cut the load in half. which will still give you span of 13'-6". 3x8's @ 12" oc or 2x10's would be my suggestion. BOB
buletbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:09 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Western Masschusetts
Posts: 575
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


yeah, you'll need to sister everything with X8s or X10s, and then add that same 2X in between all the existing joists. then add a beam and some posts underneath downstairs.

then subfloor with 3/4" tongue and groove plywood. that will hold anything that's needed, provided the rest of the garage is framed soundly.

i had to do the exact same thing in my barn. there were rough cut 2X6 (maybe 8, can't remember) roughly 2' OC. i added X10 in between them all and called it good enough. that leaves a ceiling down below which will have to be furred for drywalling, but no big deal.

you're basically looking at building the upstairs from scratch here.

you could just take all the X6 out (it's a moot point, even if sistered) and reframe with X10 16 OC.

Last edited by wombosi; 10-26-2008 at 10:11 PM.
wombosi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2008, 10:58 PM   #15
Structural Engineer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 64
Rewards Points: 0
Default

Upper floor of our garage...


2x6's won't get close to cutting it. Without actually looking at it, my gut tells me you'll need to replace the 2x6's. Depending on how much you want to spend and how much you want to eat into the head room you have on the first level, I would go with wood I-beam joist. Even then you might need a girder to cut your spans in half. What ever you do you'll need to look at the bearing conditions for the floor system, you'll probably need to beef up the framing for the bearing walls. Also, you'll need at least 5/8" sheathing on that floor system. You'll need to stagger the joints on the sheathing and fasten the perimeter at 6" and fasten the field (middle of the sheets) at 12" for each sheet. This sheathing and fastening pattern is pretty typical for a floor diaphragm and is need for the floor to carry shear in resisting lateral forces (typically wind) on the structure.

I'd be interested to hear what you find out if you have someone look at it.

wildcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mold in detached garage jkrodger Building & Construction 15 05-01-2009 01:46 PM
Light Switch to Detached Garage - Grounding Issue smitty286 Electrical 1 10-22-2008 12:17 PM
double car garage slightly uneven... mcvane Building & Construction 6 11-25-2007 08:41 AM
Crazy Garage Extension, Building over blacktop?!?! commissure General DIY Discussions 4 09-13-2007 11:09 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.