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n0c7 04-29-2013 11:16 AM

Unlevel foundation
 
When framing and dealing with variances in a slab, is the preferred method to build square walls on the ground and shim as necessary or to build and cut each stud to fit?

GBrackins 04-29-2013 01:33 PM

square and level always work best for me ....

n0c7 04-29-2013 01:39 PM

Seems less frustrating too. I know there is a variance in one corner but I cannot easily determine how much it is out using a string line and line level since the distance is about 22' and the line sags and the line levels tend to give sporadic readings...

If I'm really out in one corner, say an inch, would it be better to shim at sill plate or top plate?

GBrackins 04-29-2013 01:56 PM

I'd shim at the sill plates, if you start off square and level and you build square and level then it should end up square and level ....

n0c7 04-29-2013 04:44 PM

Does it affect strength and integrity if you start shimming quite a bit? Say 1-2" ?

stadry 04-29-2013 06:51 PM

while not a framer, i'd work on the levelness of the conc foundation 1st,,, don't like the idea of big shims under a rim joist,,, but maybe that's just me :wink: calling back the conc sub to fix his work is also a good idea :thumbsup: you could always get 25' of plastic tubing & make a water level - no sag in that 1

Willie T 04-30-2013 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by n0c7 (Post 1169459)
Seems less frustrating too. I know there is a variance in one corner but I cannot easily determine how much it is out using a string line and line level since the distance is about 22' and the line sags and the line levels tend to give sporadic readings...

If I'm really out in one corner, say an inch, would it be better to shim at sill plate or top plate?

Just as a side note, you might want to drop by a ceiling tile supply house and buy a spool of "Zip Line" (looks like dental floss) Throw the heavy string back in the toolbox. This stuff hardly sags at all... AND they sell neat little rubber tipped clamps for each end.

And the results usually rendered by using Line Levels are an embarrassment. Even a water level will do a better job. Fact is, I have one, and use it quite a bit... especially around corners.

BTW, don't shim. Do you want the weight of your whole house depending upon shims that may crush or eventually rot out?

n0c7 05-06-2013 12:47 AM

This is a garage pad. Any recommendations for shims?

Willie T 05-06-2013 08:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by n0c7 (Post 1173512)
This is a garage pad. Any recommendations for shims?

Oh, that's different then. Shoot, just get the kid down the street to throw it together for you.

Say... you ever build in Bangladesh? :whistling2:

jagans 05-06-2013 08:59 AM

1 Attachment(s)
You should have a perimeter curb around your garage that is level irrespective of the slab. This way you can wash the floor and hose out the garage, and your sill plates will not rot from wind blown rain, and washing the floor. If I were you I would form up a level perimeter curb with 3/4 inch plywood ripped level. Drill 1/2 inch holes in the slap and install some no. 4 rebar stub outs in the holes to lock the curb to the slab and install anchor bolts 4 ft. on center for your sole plate. Put skew-back on the top of the form on the inside to relieve the edge.

n0c7 05-07-2013 04:53 PM

I spoke with the builder and they are going to rectify the issue by adding a curb.

jagans 05-07-2013 08:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by n0c7 (Post 1174502)
I spoke with the builder and they are going to rectify the issue by adding a curb.

You will be very happy they did, my friend. Good negotiating. Dont forget the skewback to relieve that sharp edge on the inside. :thumbsup:

jomama45 05-07-2013 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jagans (Post 1174592)
You will be very happy they did, my friend. Good negotiating. Dont forget the skewback to relieve that sharp edge on the inside. :thumbsup:

I can't say I've ever seen a "skewback" used by a professional. It seems to replace an "edger", which most any concrete guy probably owns a dozen variations of, and has permanent calouses on their hands from using them. Is a "skewback" common in your locale??

n0c7 05-31-2013 05:20 PM

So they poured a curb and it still has variances, much less than 1-2" I had before all over the place, but there is one spot that is 1/2" out for about 6 feet. They're not willing to do much about it.

Oso954 05-31-2013 05:59 PM

Quote:

there is one spot that is 1/2" out for about 6 feet.
You can always set the framed wall and then fill that gap with non-shrink grout.

(and no, It is not tile grout)


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