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Old 06-15-2010, 04:00 PM   #31
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


What's the best way to cut the bottom off T1-11? Do you tear the whole sheet off, cut it, and replace? Maybe score the hell out of it with a utility knife?

Snap a chalk line were you know your beond the rot and cut with a Skill Saw. There maybe some areas that removing the whole sheet is he way to go but we'll try to leave as much on as possable. Get a cheap carbide blade or two because you’ll hit nails sooner or later.


Also, with the rotted sill, what's the best way to approach the replacement on a slab? Most of the info I can find has to do with jacking the house up to take pressure off the sill, but I have no basement or crawl space. Do I build a temporary support wall, and remove all the studs that are sitting on the sill? It's the side and back walls of a chimney, so access from the inside is going to be difficult.

Can’t say for sure until you have it opened up so we can see the whole picture. I’ve replaced more rot than I care to think about and “jacking up the house” is rare. “Temporary support”, maybe but not always. There are a lot of other forces holding the house together, so just because you slip out 4-5’ of rotted sill doesn’t mean the house will drop 1 ½” on the spot. Once again can’t say utill we see the whole picture.

Like I said, take this one wall at a time, you have different issues on different walls. When you’re ready to start, we’ll deal with wall #1.

I have a feeling you’ll be more educated on rot than you want to be before this is done.

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Last edited by kwikfishron; 06-15-2010 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 06-15-2010, 05:08 PM   #32
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


Yep, I have that feeling about the rot too. You can see in the pictures how close the grade level is to the top of the slab by the chimney. The house is on a slight hill, and at the back of the house, there is only maybe an inch or two of exposed slab under the siding. The other three sides of the house are fine. When it rains really hard, water starts pooling up at the back of the house, especially around that chimney... that's where the rot is coming from. I need to move some soil around to improve the drainage and get better siding-to-ground clearance, but it's complicated, because there are two concrete patios and a pool to contend with. I could cut through the low ends of the patios and put in linear drains that empty out to the side of the house, but I feel like I have enough work on my plate already. I'm also tearing down an old eave-attached shed-roof patio cover and building a blind-valley gable roof to replace it. It's going to be a busy summer.
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:37 PM   #33
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


Reviving the thread, I had the opportunity (or misfortune) of tearing into the siding and replacing some of the rotted sill plate this weekend. I cut out about 4 feet of sill plate, and the bottom 12” off a couple studs. The most difficult part of the whole job was trying to get the sill plate out without damaging the drywall that was nailed to it from the inside. I used a reciprocating saw to make the cuts, and slid a metal putty knife between the board and the drywall to protect it. I couldn’t really avoid tearing up the drywall by pulling the nails through it, though. Most everything was hidden by the baseboard trim on the inside, and I was able to patch up the holes from the outside, but I’m sure I’ll have plenty more sill plate to replace, and I won’t always be so lucky.

Is there a better way to do this?

Luckily, the portion I needed to replace wasn’t attached to the slab, but a little further over, I could see where it looks like the sill plate was attached with a nail and washer driven down through the plate into the slab. If I have to tear a piece out like that, how do I go about reattaching the new sill plate to the slab? Are there special fasteners that you can drive into the concrete? I had assumed there would be j-bolts that were set in the slab, and that the sill plate would be bolted down with. Guess not.
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Old 06-28-2010, 04:17 PM   #34
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


Replacing rot and not damaging the drywall is always the goal. Tricky it can be, and sometimes impossible.

It’s all about TLC and Sawzall Art.

What did you do about the studs you whacked off?

Where’s the pictures?
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Old 06-28-2010, 05:06 PM   #35
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


I didn't take as many pictures as i should have, but here are a few:

New sill plate, stud has been cut away:



New stud, toe-screwed (is that a word?) to the sill and the upper part of the stud:


Insulation:


30# felt (lapped under the existing stuff), z-flashing, siding, trim, ready for paint:


One thing I'm not so sure of, I used regular 2x4 for the sill and the stud, because I have a foot of exposed slab above grade here. I'm finding now that I probably should have used pressure treated wood for the sill plate. You think it's a big enough issue to warrant tearing it apart again?
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Old 06-28-2010, 05:59 PM   #36
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


Treated on the concrete is mandatory.

I would have also added a sister stud along your spliced stud to hold it all together.

Also, code around here anyway would have you block out at the sheathing seam so both pieces have full perimeter nailing.

Did you change your plan to re-side with Hardi?
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Old 06-28-2010, 06:18 PM   #37
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


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Treated on the concrete is mandatory.

I would have also added a sister stud along your spliced stud to hold it all together.

Did you change your plan to re-side with Hardi?
That's what I was afraid of. Is it a big enough problem that it warrants tearing everything back apart and doing it again?

Also, what about the attachment of the sill plate to the slab? It looks like the current plates were nailed to the slab with a ramset. Is there a certain way those have to be removed, or can I just pry them up? Am I risking cracking the slab if I try to shoot new fasteners into the foundation when I put in new pieces of sill plate?

Hardi is still the plan, but has been delayed a bit as other projects and expenses keep coming up.
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Old 06-28-2010, 06:43 PM   #38
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


The reason I asked about your original plan of “fixing one wall at a time and re-siding” was why spend the extra money on T1-11, flashing, caulk, and trim when you could have just covered with plywood and start siding that area.

Should you replace the sill? Yes.

Do you need to do it this weekend? No, but it should be done before you cover it for good.

Those Ramset nails can be tough. It’s usually easier to cut the wood out around it and then split the rest out. Then cut or grind off the nail.

Will new ramset nails blow out the edge of the slab? Maybe, maybe not. Tapcon screws would be a safer way to go.

P.S. You should have a gallon of "Jasco" or the like on hand to treat those “questionable areas” you decide not to replace.
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Old 06-28-2010, 07:07 PM   #39
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


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Originally Posted by kwikfishron View Post
The reason I asked about your original plan of “fixing one wall at a time and re-siding” was why spend the extra money on T1-11, flashing, caulk, and trim then you could have just covered with plywood and start siding that area.

Should you replace the sill? Yes.

Do you need to do it this weekend? No, but it should be done before you cover it for good.
That being the case, I will probably replace the sill plate and add sister studs when I'm ready to do the Hardi on that wall. I did the flashing and caulking so that I don't have to worry about water getting under there in the event that it takes me longer to get to the Hardi than I anticipate.

The T1-11 that is on there now is 7/16" thick. That seems a little thin to me... is that still an acceptable sheathing to install the hardi over?
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Old 06-28-2010, 07:10 PM   #40
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


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That being the case, I will probably replace the sill plate and add sister studs when I'm ready to do the Hardi on that wall. I did the flashing and caulking so that I don't have to worry about water getting under there in the event that it takes me longer to get to the Hardi than I anticipate.

The T1-11 that is on there now is 7/16" thick. That seems a little thin to me... is that still an acceptable sheathing to install the hardi over?
Yes it is.
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Old 06-28-2010, 08:38 PM   #41
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


all things considered you did some nice clean work there
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Old 06-28-2010, 11:35 PM   #42
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


If the ducting termination door is for a dryer, replace it with one that doesn't have the 3 segments to trap lint (it's an exhaust fan door), use a maximum flow, Type "A': http://www.appliance411.com/faq/dryer-vent-length.shtml
The trim board should be spaced away from the T1-11 to let water past rather than rely on caulking as originally installed. (For others reading that are not replacing their siding.....)

Be safe, Gary
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Old 06-29-2010, 01:26 AM   #43
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


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Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
If the ducting termination door is for a dryer, replace it with one that doesn't have the 3 segments to trap lint (it's an exhaust fan door), use a maximum flow, Type "A': http://www.appliance411.com/faq/dryer-vent-length.shtml
The trim board should be spaced away from the T1-11 to let water past rather than rely on caulking as originally installed. (For others reading that are not replacing their siding.....)

Be safe, Gary
It is for a dryer, but your info confuses me...

According to that link, the louvered vent hoods should be fine. Type "A" in the chart applies to both 4" flapper style and louver style hoods. The lesser flowing type "B" seems to be referring to 2.5" hoods. The rest of my vent setup is a short run of 4" rigid pipe, sealed with metal tape. By all accounts, it should be an ideal setup.

For reference, this is the vent hood I installed:
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

As for spacing the trim board away from the siding, that's the first I've heard of that method... what do you use as a spacer between the board and the siding?
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Old 06-29-2010, 05:41 PM   #44
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


My windows will be ready in another week or so. They are replacement windows, but the mfr is going to leave the nailing flange on. As I'm planning out the order that things will go in, I keep coming up with new questions...

- The suggested plan is putting 30# felt and hardiplank over the existing T1-11, which is installed over felt (15# I think) and studs. Will having felt on both sides of the T1-11 lead to problems due to the double moisture barrier?

- In regard to sealing the windows up properly, most of the info I have read says to wrap the felt inside the window opening, the nail flange goes over the felt, and is flashed with peel & seal. Is there an acceptable way to install the window first, with the nail flange attached directly to the T1-11, and then do the felt, siding, and trim afterwards, or is that asking for trouble?
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:19 PM   #45
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Tyvek overlap with replacing siding one wall at a time


Looks like your on the right track.

Hardi is installed over T1-11 all the time with old felt or other products behind it.

We all sure would like to see a “stand back” picture of the area you’ll be starting first, before you start.

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