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Old 04-12-2013, 09:26 PM   #16
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Turning a window into a doorway


If you plan on sawing the brick/block, plan on covering the cuts with some additional material, as the brick/block and joints aren't going to look anything like the rest of the jambs. 95% of the time we "tooth" the brick out on each side and relay them. I wouldn't consider doing this with anything but a 14" concrete/cut-off saw. The problem is that it takes some experience to control a saw of this size in the horizontal position for long stretches, especially without wrecking the rest of the wall. It's not easy to "tooth" these in, but it's often the only way to make it match the rest of the house.............

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Old 04-13-2013, 08:39 AM   #17
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Turning a window into a doorway


thanks jomama45 for bringing that up. I was going to mention to the OP that the cut brick will look bad if left as the opening and our Masons always tooth it in which takes a long time but is the correct way to do it.
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Old 04-13-2013, 09:24 AM   #18
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Turning a window into a doorway


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Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
If you plan on sawing the brick/block, plan on covering the cuts with some additional material, as the brick/block and joints aren't going to look anything like the rest of the jambs. 95% of the time we "tooth" the brick out on each side and relay them. I wouldn't consider doing this with anything but a 14" concrete/cut-off saw. The problem is that it takes some experience to control a saw of this size in the horizontal position for long stretches, especially without wrecking the rest of the wall. It's not easy to "tooth" these in, but it's often the only way to make it match the rest of the house.............
Sorry for my ignorance on this... not my thread, but I am wondering...

Can you explain the part in bold? I am really interested in what that means exactly. I am thinking you are saying that they remove more brick in a tooth pattern and then redo the brick so that where you cut ends up as uncut bricks on the edges?
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Old 04-13-2013, 11:37 AM   #19
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Turning a window into a doorway


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Originally Posted by oldhouseguy View Post
Sorry for my ignorance on this... not my thread, but I am wondering...

Can you explain the part in bold? I am really interested in what that means exactly. I am thinking you are saying that they remove more brick in a tooth pattern and then redo the brick so that where you cut ends up as uncut bricks on the edges?
Yes, that's what I mean, we remove the brick back to a full brick, staggered and relay with finished ends.

The 5% I mentioned where we don't typically have to do this is when the brick are solid and/or are getting painted to match the rest of the wall. Even in these remote cases, we still need to grind out & repair the side of the joint at the jamb to it's full and matches the style of the rest of the surrounding veneer.
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Old 04-13-2013, 05:18 PM   #20
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Turning a window into a doorway


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Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
Yes, that's what I mean, we remove the brick back to a full brick, staggered and relay with finished ends.

The 5% I mentioned where we don't typically have to do this is when the brick are solid and/or are getting painted to match the rest of the wall. Even in these remote cases, we still need to grind out & repair the side of the joint at the jamb to it's full and matches the style of the rest of the surrounding veneer.
That's why you are a pro at this!

When I did mine, I cut both sides of the brick flush, extended the jamb out level with the brick, and built a trim column on each side to cover my cuts. Because I was doing an entry way where there was a window, I felt like it didn't need to match the rest of the house. I wanted it to look a bit more "grand", if that makes sense.

I did this a few years ago and if I had to do what you guys do, I would still be working on it.

Thanks for clarifying, I kinda thought that's how it should be done.

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Last edited by oldhouseguy; 04-13-2013 at 05:23 PM.
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