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-   -   trying to reuse sill plate studs without cutting them question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/trying-reuse-sill-plate-studs-without-cutting-them-question-180541/)

Pawl 05-25-2013 11:55 PM

trying to reuse sill plate studs without cutting them question
 
I was trying to figure out how to install new sill plate studs to hold the new sill plate down when I cut the 3 existing ones so I can replace the rotted sill plate and rim joist. But it just dawned on me that I can remove all the old rotted wood once I get the weight off the subfloor using the temporary wall. But shouldnt I be able to use the old studs if I carefully cut the old original nuts off. I just dont know if I can clean the rust off well enough to reuse it. If I remove all the wood around the existing studs it will expose the entire stud,washer and nut. If I can cut it off without ruining the threads,then clean up the threads,get a new nut I might be back in business. Any thoughts?

gregzoll 05-26-2013 12:19 AM

I wouldn't, if there is rotted wood there. Really need to remove all rotted wood, due to wet rotted wood, attracts Carpenter ants & Termites, along with other critters like Silverfish and Centipedes/milipedes.

Pawl 05-26-2013 01:04 AM

I am removing all the old wood. What I am talking about here is using the original stud,washer and a new nut to hold the new sill plate down.

gregzoll 05-26-2013 01:17 AM

If the threads are still good, and the stud is not so rusted, that the nut will not torque down within proper spec's go for it. Personally, if the wood was so rotted, that there is evidence of rust on the stud, you may be better off in cutting the stud off and then using a hammer drill to drill a hole, so that you can epoxy a new stud in, for holding the sill plate. Also if this is a concrete slab, not a home on a crawlspace or basement, I would be using "Blue" wood or Pressure treated lumber for the sill plate.

Pawl 05-26-2013 01:30 AM

gregzoll - thanks for the information. The house was built in 1965,the threads are very rusty. I am going to use your advice and change it. I have a crawlspace underneath. I think I can get a hammer drill in there once the old wood is out.
I also noticed there was a 66" piece of metal under the sill plate on top of the concrete foundation that flares out about an inch on both sides that seems to be positioned just under the patio sliding door area. Just read a post that described it as a termite shield. But he did not say anything else about it. Are you familiar with this?
I am also going to use the pressure treated wood on the sill. My problem was the concrete slab was poured many years ago and the backyard was never graded. I am currently in the process of dropping the elevation about 6 " below all the vents. Between the concrete and dirt 8 to 10" is coming out.

gregzoll 05-26-2013 01:36 AM

Probably correct. We have that at the building I work at. Mostly to keep the bugs from crawling up the wall, to get into the weep holes. We nicknamed our building the Faraday cage, due to we cannot get any cell signal whatsoever.

As for the hammer drill, you may have to rent a Right Angled head unit, since most straight on, are hard to use, when you have outer sheathing on the structure, unless you have removed that also in the area that you are working on.

Pawl 05-26-2013 01:58 AM

I have all that removed (stucco,paper,wire mesh) because the moisture problem just made a lot of the stucco crumble off. Even with all of that gone I might still have to drill it at a 45 degree angle with a regular hammer drill. I am going to have to rent the tool so I might as well rent the right angle head unit. Do you know the size and how far the new stud needs to go into the existing foundation? I guess I can just measure thickness of old stud but dont know how deep to go. I will continue to search.

gregzoll 05-26-2013 02:21 AM

I would check with your local office in Orange County, what they state. Helps also to have a GC (General Contractor) available to help guide you through all of this, so that you do not get hassled by the inspector, when they come through to check each step. With changes due to earthquakes, you may find that there is going to be a larger headache at hand, if they require more than just a couple of studs epoxied into the concrete, along with earthquake anchors along the wall.

kwikfishron 05-26-2013 05:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pawl (Post 1187714)
I was trying to figure out how to install new sill plate studs to hold the new sill plate down when I cut the 3 existing ones so I can replace the rotted sill plate and rim joist. But it just dawned on me that I can remove all the old rotted wood once I get the weight off the subfloor using the temporary wall. But shouldnt I be able to use the old studs if I carefully cut the old original nuts off. I just dont know if I can clean the rust off well enough to reuse it. If I remove all the wood around the existing studs it will expose the entire stud,washer and nut. If I can cut it off without ruining the threads,then clean up the threads,get a new nut I might be back in business. Any thoughts?

Don't start cutting off the foundation bolts. Remove the nuts, spray them down with PB Blaster (or similar) a few times and let them soak. If that doesn't quite get it heat them up with a small torch after you have dug out the rot around them.

AndyGump 05-26-2013 10:50 AM

1 Attachment(s)
You might think about something like this.

Simpson catalog, UFP10 universal foundation plate.


Andy.

Pawl 05-26-2013 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwikfishron (Post 1187792)
Don't start cutting off the foundation bolts. Remove the nuts, spray them down with PB Blaster (or similar) a few times and let them soak. If that doesn't quite get it heat them up with a small torch after you have dug out the rot around them.

I actually have been soaking them with the PB Blaster. I would have to think if I go to turn the nut and the stud/nut both turn that the stud has come loose in the foundation. I thought I would go ahead and add the same amount of new studs (3) that I am dealing with now and try to use the old ones too. I can't be sure the original rusty ones are 100%. The labor is free with me doing the work so I dont want to pinch pennies here. Just a lot of small stuff to deal with. I just have to keep my eyes on the prize.

Pawl 05-26-2013 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndyGump (Post 1187977)
You might think about something like this.

Simpson catalog, UFP10 universal foundation plate.


Andy.

Thanks Andy. I like them. Its cheap insurance considering where we live. Have you ever used them or know what amount of spacing they recommend? Also do you use 12 ton bottle jacks or something larger for holding a beam against the subfloor?

AndyGump 05-26-2013 11:16 AM

It is not insurance, it is a replacement for the anchor bolts and many cities allow them to do just that in certain cases like yours.

I have specified them for repairs like yours and the Building departments like them.

Andy.

Pawl 05-26-2013 12:39 PM

In my case I would just place them inside the crawlspace where I cut each stud?

Pawl 05-26-2013 12:44 PM

I was also thinking about putting weepscreed in when I start to patch the exterior walls back up.


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