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Spydey 11-21-2013 08:18 PM

Truss issue
 
2 Attachment(s)
I have a slight hump on the outside over hang part of the roof. It's about 2ft up from the edge. The roof is a low slope roof. I went up into the attic to inspect that area and noticed where the hump was, the truss seems to have separated from the joist. What's the best way to fix this? I've attached a couple pics so that you can get an idea of what I'm talking about.

Thanks,

Rob

joecaption 11-22-2013 06:24 AM

That's some interesting framing you have.
Hard to see much in those pictures.

Some reasons for the truss to up lift.
It's just toe nailed in place and no hurricane ties, the toe nail just blew out the side of the cord.
Plywood installed to tight, there was suppose to be H clips between the panels in the middle of the trusses and gaps where the short butt ends meet.
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...lectedIndex=42

In one of those pictures the lower part of the plywood looks pretty funky, water damage from no storm and ice shield on the roof and or no drip edge, clogged gutters, not enough over hang on the shingles?

No insulation up there? What's up with that? in your area there should have be R50.

Maintenance 6 11-22-2013 06:48 AM

It looks like your hump is being caused by a sag of the tail of the truss. considering that the plywood also looks like it has some water damage, my guess would be that the tail has some water damage as well. Today, you would put hurricane ties where the truss meets the beam, and I would add those if it were me. It is possible to sister a new 2x4 to the side of the truss to correct the sag and then replace the damaged plywood. I am guessing this is some kind of shed, garage or pavillion by the construction?

Spydey 11-22-2013 06:50 AM

Thanks for the quick reply and sorry for the poor quality pics as it was hard for me to take clear pics while holding a flashlight and phone at the same time. The house was built in the mid 70s so the framing must have been quite different back then. There was probably some slight water damage near the edge but that has been taken care of. The roof has been reshingled a year and a half ago with ice and water shield 6ft up from the edge. There's no insulation on that part because that area is the overhang part of the house. You see in the pic, the bottom is the aluminum soffits. The rest of the attic have wood chips for insulation which isn't quite adequate by today's standards but that was the standard back in the 70s.

Spydey 11-22-2013 07:06 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Maintenance 6
It looks like your hump is being caused by a sag of the tail of the truss. considering that the plywood also looks like it has some water damage, my guess would be that the tail has some water damage as well. Today, you would put hurricane ties where the truss meets the beam, and I would add those if it were me. It is possible to sister a new 2x4 to the side of the truss to correct the sag and then replace the damaged plywood. I am guessing this is some kind of shed, garage or pavillion by the construction?

Thanks for the reply. This is part of the house. It's right above the front door. Sort of the overhang part of the house. Sorry if i didn't explain it properly. I'm not sure what the correct term is for that area. I've attached a pic of the front of the house. You can't see the hump in the pic but it's in the area to the left of the door. You can see how that part of the roof over hangs the house.

joecaption 11-22-2013 08:55 AM

Wood chips have never been a standard or expectable way to insulate an attic.
Any way you could have someone stand in that area to see if it goes down and have the truss make contact again. If so doing that and adding the hurricane tie I posted may take care of it.

Spydey 11-22-2013 02:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption
Wood chips have never been a standard or expectable way to insulate an attic. Any way you could have someone stand in that area to see if it goes down and have the truss make contact again. If so doing that and adding the hurricane tie I posted may take care of it.


Ya, I don't think so either regarding the wood chip insulation. I plan on having it vacuumed out and have proper insulation blown in. Thanks for the suggestion. I'm gonna take the sheathing off that area once the weather gets warmer and see what's the best option I have to repair it.

gregzoll 11-22-2013 02:45 PM

As for that truss, improper install, and a heavy snow load can cause that. What part of Canada are you in? Any other trusses with that kind of damage?

I am guessing those are not original to the home, and added later on. What year was your place built? I am guessing mid to late 30's, or mid 40's, with the framing for the ceiling, along with style of overhang on the porch area.

Spydey 11-22-2013 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll
As for that truss, improper install, and a heavy snow load can cause that. What part of Canada are you in? Any other trusses with that kind of damage? I am guessing those are not original to the home, and added later on. What year was your place built? I am guessing mid to late 30's, or mid 40's, with the framing for the ceiling, along with style of overhang on the porch area.

You are correct. Was most likely a heavy snow load. I'm in Edmonton, Canada and the winters here see tons of snow. I couldn't see all the trusses but everywhere else on the roof is flat and even which leaves me to believe that they're fine. I guess that area doesn't have much support because it overhangs and with heavy snow, could cause it to sag. Regarding the trusses, I'm pretty sure they are original. The house was built in the mid 70s.

gregzoll 11-22-2013 03:37 PM

That pitch to me is too low, if you are getting that much snow load, to cause failure at the tails.

I would contact a local Truss manufacturer, and show them the pictures, see what they state about the fix. Worse case scenario, they may suggest going with 2x6 trusses vs. keeping those 2x4's.

DexterII 11-22-2013 03:40 PM

...

Never mind. I can see the picture better now for some reason.

Spydey 11-22-2013 05:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll
That pitch to me is too low, if you are getting that much snow load, to cause failure at the tails. I would contact a local Truss manufacturer, and show them the pictures, see what they state about the fix. Worse case scenario, they may suggest going with 2x6 trusses vs. keeping those 2x4's.

I will look into that. The rest of the trusses in that area look fine it's just that 1 that came off. Probably need to reinforce just that one.

Gary in WA 11-22-2013 10:10 PM

As someone said, cut those toe-nails (holding it elevated- expect it is under tension pressure- be careful) and add a nailer to the side of the truss to reattach the hanging porch ceiling as the trusses are cantilevered out carrying it all. Popular in the '60's (in CA) though with snow loads....... sure hope there is a bearing wall behind that tree- out of the picture, lol.

Gary

Spydey 11-23-2013 02:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gary in WA
As someone said, cut those toe-nails (holding it elevated- expect it is under tension pressure- be careful) and add a nailer to the side of the truss to reattach the hanging porch ceiling as the trusses are cantilevered out carrying it all. Popular in the '60's (in CA) though with snow loads....... sure hope there is a bearing wall behind that tree- out of the picture, lol. Gary


Sounds like a plan. Thanks Gary for the insight. Much appreciated :) and yes there's a bearing wall behind that tree. It's only the small porch area that over hangs. Rob


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