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-   -   TREX Decking with non-removable Stains (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/trex-decking-non-removable-stains-23908/)

Owen Gailar 07-19-2008 12:41 PM

TREX Decking with non-removable Stains
 
We had a new TREX deck installed about 2 months ago. In one month sticky red spots (Fallout from trees) begain to appear. TREX suggested detergent, bleach and hot water...it removed the sticky spots but left SPREADING red/brown stains behind. TREX rep brought and used cleaning powder...which didn't work. Suggested stronger cleaner with oxalic acid didn't work. Deck is now about 70% mottled (Leopared spots). We've had trees removed, chimmny cleaned and extended, but refuse to cut down redwoods. Complained to TREX (Pat), who said we were being "Unreasonable".
Regardless of the cause, is this a "Low maintanence" material?
To borrow from the Yiddish slang, is it TREX or is it DREX?

BuiltByMAC 07-19-2008 04:17 PM

Bummer you didn't do more online research BEFORE buying and installing TREX - there are a lot of stories out there from people w/ cleaning issues...

Low-maintenance is in the eyes of the beholder - how nice do you want it to look and how hard are you willing to work to make it look nice?

People have offered various solutions to removing stains on composite decking - on this site and others. Do some searching, try out some products and hopefully the stains will fade over time ... just like the decking will.

Mac

hardwood_decks 07-31-2008 10:05 AM

1 Attachment(s)
You should rip the trex off and replace it with real hardwood decking like Ipe, Tigerwood, or Cumaru. Composite decks are not low maintenance, they are just marketed as low maintenance to get mor people to buy them. I have included a recent photo of an Ipe Deck we installed, we purchase all our hardwood decking materials from www.advantagelumber.com.

Hardwood decking materials can be sanded easily if you do get tree sap on it, they also naturall resist mold, mildew, decay, and insect attack without any preservatives or chemicals.

The deck I included a picture of will look that good for 40+ years doing nothing but applying a UV Inhibitor to the deck about every other year to prevent the sun from bleaching the color out of the wood. The UV Inhibitor is essentialy a sun screen and its really easy to apply, you just rub it on with a paint roller it only takes about 15 minutes for an average sized deck.

rdadams 10-05-2008 11:01 AM

Were you successful?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Owen Gailar (Post 140740)
We had a new TREX deck installed about 2 months ago. In one month sticky red spots (Fallout from trees) begain to appear. TREX suggested detergent, bleach and hot water...it removed the sticky spots but left SPREADING red/brown stains behind. TREX rep brought and used cleaning powder...which didn't work. Suggested stronger cleaner with oxalic acid didn't work. Deck is now about 70% mottled (Leopared spots). We've had trees removed, chimmny cleaned and extended, but refuse to cut down redwoods. Complained to TREX (Pat), who said we were being "Unreasonable".
Regardless of the cause, is this a "Low maintanence" material?
To borrow from the Yiddish slang, is it TREX or is it DREX?

What did the stains look like. I have TREX and there seem to be leopard stains coming up from inside the material rather than appearing from foreign material that fall on the surface? Did you ever get rid of your stains, and how did you do it? Bob in NC.

chalk_hill 10-06-2008 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hardwood_decks (Post 144595)
You should rip the trex off and replace it with real hardwood decking like Ipe, Tigerwood, or Cumaru.

This is not really helpful advice to the topic.

If the trees are dropping sap that can stain a plastic deck, what do you think they would do to a wood deck? :rolleyes: Tree sap is not exactly a Trex fault is it?

I have had similar issues when water sealing wood decks. In that case it turned out to be areas on the deck where dew gathered overnight and particulates from the air (pollution) dissolved into the wet areas. As these spots dried in the early morning sun they concentrated the pollutants into "stains" on the deck.

I had an issue with a Timbertech deck where rain leached out tannins from the wood portion of the composite and gathered and concentrated them in the same way. H/o was pretty mad about it (wife made him clean every time it rained) and Timbertech wouldn't help out, but eventually all the tannins leached out and it ended up uniform.

Another possibility might be that the bleaching accelerated the fading of the deck and that given a little time, it may all fade in together.

:offtopic:Please consider that when you build an ipe / tigerwood deck you are contributing to the pillage of the tropical rainforests. While you may beleive your deck will be there in 40 years the statistics say otherwise. Consider that most of the great California redwood forests we cut down a century ago are long consigned to the landfills. 400 yr old trees split into fence boards and decks that fell down, got remodelled or redeveloped in a decade or so.

Choose any composite instead.

Patricia Folsom 10-06-2008 10:30 PM

We installed a Trex Deck and Railing system three years ago at a cost of $15,000. This spring the deck began to split, crack, and flake. We contacted Trex, then sent an inspector out and the result was they offered to replace 58 boards...............the cost of tear out was ours, the cost of hauling away the tear out was ours, and the labor costs to replace the deck and railing is ours. The estimates we have had from several contractors to do all the above is $5,000 plus.
We were led to believe by their brochures and local contractors and material suppliers that Trex was the best and guaranteed to last up to 25 years. If only we had known at that time of all the problems people have had with Trex. And, if only we had known that the Trex guarantees are worthless.

I strongly recommend that anyone considering installing a Trex decking system to think twice. They could care less about your problems and pocketbook, and Trex does not stand behind their product.

Individuals in the Northern Arizona area who have problems with Trex decking and have had the " TOO BAD" attitude from Trex, need to get together and start a law suit against Trex. It seems that is the only thing they might respond to.

chalk_hill 10-06-2008 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patricia Folsom (Post 169142)

I strongly recommend that anyone considering installing a Trex decking system to think twice. They could care less about your problems and pocketbook, and Trex does not stand behind their product.

Individuals in the Northern Arizona area who have problems with Trex decking and have had the " TOO BAD" attitude from Trex, need to get together and start a law suit against Trex. It seems that is the only thing they might respond to.

You seem to have missed my point. Individuals in the Northern Arizona area who have problems with Trex decking are NOT getting a "too bad" attitude. They are getting their delaminating decks replaced - labor, materials, tear-off and install.

I can't say why the experience here is any different but I would be happy to offer any clues I can if I knew more about your location and situation.

Patricia Folsom 10-07-2008 10:59 AM

Decaying Trex
 
Chalk Hill:

You are from the Sedona area.....I am from the Prescott area. And, if you can suggest anything that we haven't already done, such as, contact
Trex, fill out all the forms, take all the pictures, met with their inspector, whereby they took many pictures, and then be met with their offer to replace 58 of 62 boards...............then I would be more than happy to listen.

According to their inspector/adjustor on his visit, there was no reason for the failure other than a bad batch. Before he left, he stated that Trex would probably take care of the whole thing! Just another lie!

I suppose I should be just thrilled to put $15,000 into something that failed within 3 years. Gosh, had I expected that to happen, I could have replaced the old deck with plain wood decking, had it painted every year, and still be ahead of the game. I would like to know anyone out there who would willing put a load of money into something that would not stand up as all the Trex literature claims.

I doubt if there is anything I can do about it but advise all the local contractors, State Attorney General's office, Consumer Protection Board, Better Business Bureau, and everyone I can reach, that they should not install a Trex deck. I am fairly connected in our area so I will get out the word and encourage everyone I know to spread the word.....not to put out their hard earned money on any Trex product. And, :huh:I doubt if Trex will do anything honorable.

To date, I have convinced six people in our area not to go ahead with Trex decking they were planning on installing in the past month or so. I feel good that I might have saved someone else's pocketbook.

chalk_hill 10-07-2008 07:25 PM

Patricia,

I have done many Trex replacements in the Prescott area. Contact me off the forum and I'll see if I can offer any insight.

Patricia Folsom 10-07-2008 07:42 PM

Chalk Hill - Re: Decay decking
 
I would be more than happy to speak with you, on the phone, or by e-mail in regards to your recommendations regarding our Trex decking problems.

Send me your off-forum e-mail address and I would like very much to hear your thoughts.

chalk_hill 10-07-2008 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patricia Folsom (Post 169449)
Send me your off-forum e-mail address and I would like very much to hear your thoughts.

Private message sent.


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