DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   TREX deck materials, Problems? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/trex-deck-materials-problems-22178/)

KayonLOMT 06-12-2008 02:15 PM

TREX deck materials, Problems?
 
We want to build a deck and outdoor kitchen area that will be about 25 X 40-45 feet about 15 inches tall, on a single level covering a flat area that has a sandy base, but many tiny oak upshoots - hence raised deck and not stone patio. One company we're talking to said they would not install TREX because the wood split and they won't use it. I have a feeling that they do not pre-drill/counter sink their screws. Other than that, has anyone had any problems with Trex or have any advice about composite materials and what not to use. I know that the under pinnings/supports must be of wood. Someone in an earlier post said something about Veranca. Also what about Ameradeck?
KayonLOMT

Termite 06-12-2008 02:32 PM

As far as I'm concerned, most composites are junk. The biggest complaint I hear about Trex in particular is the fact that it will fade, often significantly. What you install will look totally different next year. If you use the correct screws, pre-drilling composite is not necessary.

I don't understand why people still use composite when for about the same money you can use Ipe (or similar) decking. It will last 50+ years whether you take care of it or not, is hard as a rock, it is very dimensionally stable, and looks absolutely beautiful with an oil stain.

KayonLOMT 06-12-2008 02:46 PM

TREX deck materials, Problems?
 
I've seen the Ipe and it's absolutely beautiful, but I wanted to do something environmentally correct. HUM - where does Ipe come from? Is it one of those trees from Brazil whose harvest is devastating their forests?

Kayonlomt

Termite 06-12-2008 03:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KayonLOMT (Post 129961)
Is it one of those trees from Brazil whose harvest is devastating their forests?

Yup, that'd be the ones.

Opting for a petroleum-based deck is certainly more environmentally responsible! :laughing:

KayonLOMT 06-12-2008 03:22 PM

Trex deck materials, Problems?
 
HUM - you're laughing - does that mean that you do not favor environmentally friendly products? OR is it that they are just not as dependable/well developed as they should be? FYI - I have found the other TREX threads and am going to have a long talk with myself about IPE - glad to get the skinny on TREX, but will also check out the other decking that is mentioned in those other comments.

Termite 06-12-2008 03:40 PM

I don't want to get into an eco-debate here. Sorry for laughing. I'm not opposed to eco-friendly materials, but don't be fooled into thinking that since your deck didn't grow in a forest, its eco-friendly.

Although written by a major Ipe/wood supplier, this is a good read for you...
http://www.ironwoods.com/newsite/iro...inability.html

KayonLOMT 06-12-2008 04:00 PM

TREX deck materials, Problems?
 
Many thanks for your comments. Did look at the site and will study it further. Also, there's another issue - like with coffee - if we support the people who are "doing it right" it encourages that behavior.

Shelley Merryfield 06-21-2008 07:15 PM

Trex
 
I would hesitate to purchase TREX again. It is supposed to be maintenance free, but ours has mildew. TREX says it is not their product that is defective, but we know that had some bad batches. Very expensive to be this disappointed.

BuiltByMAC 06-21-2008 11:01 PM

Most eco-friendly deck board out there? Locally grown/harvested wood (cedar/redwood/pt syp or pt hemfir)...
locally grown means the boards don't have to be shipped (ie, use oil to fuel transport)
wood v. composite means no oil in production of board,
wood is least invasive to environment (cedar/redwood are better than pt - no chemicals)
when treated AND INSTALLED right, wood decks can last 25-35 years,
AND
when you rebuild the deck down the road, the existing wood decking can be fully recycled into bark-o-mulch (although not pt syp or hemfir)

Do not delude yourself into thinking that composite means eco-friendly. One of the big problems w/ composite boards is that they mold easily - using harsh chemicals to clean them is not eco-friendly.

If you go the hardwood route, there are ways of checking where the hardwood came from to ensure you're not harming another part of the world so your deck can be built...

Mac


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:41 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved