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Old 11-30-2009, 07:31 AM   #1
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toe nailing


Too often I split the wood while toe nailing.

A) What am I doing wrong?
B) Does the stud need to be replaced if there is a split, it may either be at the bottom on the sill or at the top. The splits run from the nails.

Thanks

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Old 11-30-2009, 08:19 AM   #2
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toe nailing


Are you hand nailing or using a nail gun?

Try starting the nail higher up the stud and not going at such a steep angle.....sounds like you aren't nailing into enough of the meat of the stud

Also, if you are hand nailing, try dulling the point of your 16d nail before nailing. Flip it over and hit the point with your hammer to flatten the point a little, seems to drive easier without splitting the wood.

Replacing the stud will depend on how much damage is actually done. If you blow out 3/4 of the stud then yes you should replace, but as long as the stud is intact and the structural integrity is not effected, then it is okay. Some wood splitting is inevitable, just make sure the stud is secure.

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Old 11-30-2009, 09:03 AM   #3
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toe nailing


Thanks,
Was splitting with nail and hammer, didn't work. Switched to framing gun, didn't work.
I do believe I am not getting enough "meat" and my angle is too steep. Will continue trying to get it right. Thanks for the info on the splitting. I don't think any splits are really bad, but I like to keep everything as quality as can be.
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Old 11-30-2009, 10:20 AM   #4
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http://books.google.com/books?id=_CP...age&q=&f=false

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Old 11-30-2009, 10:31 AM   #5
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toe nailing


Quote:
Originally Posted by sharp View Post
Thanks,
Was splitting with nail and hammer, didn't work. Switched to framing gun, didn't work.
I do believe I am not getting enough "meat" and my angle is too steep. Will continue trying to get it right. Thanks for the info on the splitting. I don't think any splits are really bad, but I like to keep everything as quality as can be.
You're not using 16d's to toenail, are you? If you are, that's your problem.All you need is 8d's for toenailing.
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Old 11-30-2009, 10:54 AM   #6
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toe nailing


One trick that will help you is first tap the nail straight in at about 1-3/4" above the plate. It should be in the stud far enough that it will stick there if you let go of it... about a quarter of an inch.

Then you tilt the head upward to your driving angle (around 30 degrees), and drive it on home.
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Old 11-30-2009, 01:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Carola View Post
You're not using 16d's to toenail, are you? If you are, that's your problem.All you need is 8d's for toenailing.
Sharp, I just wanted to add that Joe is one of the pros we are blessed to have posting on this site. He is from a region where toenailing wall studs is standard practice so he is very well versed in it. If you've read his other posts you'll find out that he has probably toenailed more lumber in a week (maybe a day) than we'll ever think about.
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Old 11-30-2009, 07:30 PM   #8
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toe nailing


Thanks for the replies. I will try the new approaches, hope to pick the skill up real soon. Will confirm nail size this week.
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Old 11-30-2009, 11:17 PM   #9
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toe nailing


Is the wood your using from Home Depot? They are notorious for extremely dry wood, At least the HD's by me are. Extremely dry wood splits pretty easy.
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Old 12-10-2009, 09:11 PM   #10
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toe nailing


This is getting on my last nerve. I am pretty much a novice when it comes to carpentry things but have helped my dad my entire life. I have now reached my breaking point. What is the correct way to toe nail a 2x4 to an already constructed top 2x4 without it moving or slipping with each hit?? I am not able to nail it in at the correct marking. Its hard already for me to nail things abovet my head, but on an angle, and loose? Ahh, someone help me!!
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Old 12-10-2009, 09:21 PM   #11
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toe nailing


Nail gun

Or if doing studs you have a scrap piece 14.5" that you put up that pushes against the last stud
That way each stud is 16" OC
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Old 12-10-2009, 09:44 PM   #12
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toe nailing


Sharp,
With some practice, it becomes easy to put the toe of your boot a couple of inches up on the back side of the stud to be nailed. You hold your foot firmly down on the plate and you reach around the stud from one direction with the nail in one hand, and from the other direction with the hammer in that hand. You'll kind of have your shoulder against the back side of the stud. (You're standing behind the stud, and nailing the other side of it.) The stud will move a little, so start about a half inch back from where you hope to end up. But don't worry if you go a little past the line with those first two nails on the one side... because you will be able to move the stud back when you nail the other side.

Another good method of holding a stud in place is to tap in a nail into the plate on the opposite side from where you will be nailing, right up against the side of the stud. That nail will hold the stud pretty much in place, and it is very easy to pull out.

The guy in the picture is NOT using his toe as he needs to be. His toe won't hold a thing the way he has it so far away from the stud... but that's because he has already nailed the side his boot is on.

Click HERE for a sequence of the same sort of pictures.
Attached Images
 

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Last edited by Willie T; 12-10-2009 at 10:03 PM.
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