Is There A Method To Cross Nailing? I Seem To Be No Good At It. - Building & Construction - Page 3 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-17-2013, 05:48 PM   #31
Wire Chewer
 
Red Squirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,221
Rewards Points: 2,020
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


I'm working now so have not been able to try anything else, but I just checked and the nails I have are galvanized, so at least that saves me from having to buy something else for the bottom. Once the walls are done I plan to get it spray foamed right to the floor (probably next year), then I'll probably add some roxul. No vapor barrier since the foam will act as one. None of these walls will be load bearing. If I was building from scratch I'd definitely be nailing from the top as I don't need to match up with anything else so it's easier to just make it straight than to try to curve it with indifferences in the ground.

I did put the top plate first as that way I was able to line up the bottom with a plumb bob. In fact I've only been measuring my 16" centers from the top, then use the plumb bob to make the bottom line. that way if I make a mistake somewhere where a stud is not 100% straight I'm not carrying it over to the next one.

Advertisement

Red Squirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2013, 11:46 PM   #32
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 43
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


it is called toe nailing, and a framing gun helps for the inexperienced. I personally, if I have to hand nail, drive a nail against the opposite side of the stud to hold it. then nail two nails to the opposing side, it will move over, hit the stud in place then drive the third nail in the center after I pull the holding nail. in your case I would use screws. also a 20oz hammer is easier
ubcguy89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2013, 10:16 PM   #33
Wire Chewer
 
Red Squirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,221
Rewards Points: 2,020
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Finally cleared enough snow to get the car out of the driveway and went to get some screws. These should do right? It shows a picture of a guy building a house on the other side of the box, if that means anything.

Think what I will do is drive one screw per end to hold the stud in place then drive two nails on the opposite end and leave it at that. Think this will work ok? I'll also predrill the holes for the screws and nails.

I was also thinking, should I double up on the bottom plate, as to make drywall install easier? With the dricore and having to leave a small gap for any movement there wont be much of the plate left for the drywall screws to go into. I can always add a 2x2 afterwards too though. What is the typical way to handle this? I've been told I should even put the dricore first, but I rather not as I want a gap so that if by chance I get water seepage it wont just spill over on top of the dricore, but actually go under it.
Attached Thumbnails
Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.-dsc04980e.jpg  
Red Squirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2013, 10:33 PM   #34
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,669
Rewards Points: 2,096
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


I always install a double sole plate. You do the layout on the first PT plate, and fasten it to the floor with Rawl spikes, then you build the wall, stand it up and fasten wall to the bottom plate with nails. Gives you something to nail the base molding to without hunting for studs. So you didnt buy a framing nailer huh? You must have a lot of extra time to kill.

Number 8 is pretty thin for three inch screws. Maybe you can put one screw on the left side and hammer two HD Galvanized 10d nails on the right to save screws. Just a thought.
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "


Last edited by jagans; 03-22-2013 at 10:36 PM.
jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2013, 10:42 PM   #35
747
registered
 
747's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Illinois (kankakee county)
Posts: 1,344
Rewards Points: 524
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


just use screws. If you suck at toe nailing.
747 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2013, 10:49 PM   #36
Wire Chewer
 
Red Squirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,221
Rewards Points: 2,020
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jagans View Post

Number 8 is pretty thin for three inch screws. Maybe you can put one screw on the left side and hammer two HD Galvanized 10d nails on the right to save screws. Just a thought.
Yeah that's my plan. The screw will be mostly just to hold it temporarily, but it will be left in as extra support.

I looked at nailers, but they're so specialized and then I need to buy the special nails for them, a hammer is more versatile and I don't need special nails. If I was a framer by trade or building a whole house, maybe I'd buy one, but for just doing the basement, I rather not buy a tool I'll probably not use again, or by the time I do need it they'll have stopped making the nails for it. They're also not cheap. And if I rent I will feel too rushed as it's costing me as time is ticking, I rather just own my tools. I think once I finally get started it will go faster as I get the pace up.

Good to know about doubling up the bottom, this is what I'll do, I'll have to remove the studs I started though but I kinda butchered those anyway so best to just restart.
Red Squirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2013, 11:59 PM   #37
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 43
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jagans View Post
I always install a double sole plate. You do the layout on the first PT plate, and fasten it to the floor with Rawl spikes, then you build the wall, stand it up and fasten wall to the bottom plate with nails. Gives you something to nail the base molding to without hunting for studs. So you didnt buy a framing nailer huh? You must have a lot of extra time to kill.

Number 8 is pretty thin for three inch screws. Maybe you can put one screw on the left side and hammer two HD Galvanized 10d nails on the right to save screws. Just a thought.
you must have alot of extra money to burn. I have never heard of anyone doing double bottom plates. Double top, anytime I am framing with something going on top.
ubcguy89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2013, 11:09 AM   #38
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,771
Rewards Points: 158
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


exactly, especially for walls that arent bearing walls. the only two times a double bottom plate is needed is when you will doing an overpour plate for in floor heat on top of a regular wood framed floor or the odd time on a renovation when you have a odd wall height where its cheaper to add a second plate than it is to buy studs that are a foot longer
woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 06:15 PM   #39
Wire Chewer
 
Red Squirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,221
Rewards Points: 2,020
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Finally stopped procrastinating and started working on this again. I have a nice stretch of days off so I hope to get some progress in.

The idea of the double bottom plate is to give more surface area to fasten the drywall/baseboards, as the dricore adds a bit of height. Or is there an easier way that I'm overlooking? I'm also finding that just predrilling then nailing is helping tremendously. I use screws in awkward areas to at least get a piece into position then use nails for the rest.
Red Squirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2013, 06:41 PM   #40
Member
 
funfool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Albuquerque NM
Posts: 706
Rewards Points: 508
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Good old stick framing, I also would frame it as you are. Put in the top and bottom plates, fill it in with studs.
Would be fine to run your studs at 24" on center. Is not structural and is only holding drywall and maybe insulation.

And maybe you do need to predrill. I bought some 14' 2x4 from HD a couple months ago.
14' is just not a popular or commonly used size. I got it to the job site and stuff was so dry, was hard as rock. I did have to predrill just to put screws in it.
I would use a framing nailer for this project, and would be a good excuse to buy a new toy

But using 3" gold wood screws would be my second choice, just slower. Hand driving the toe nails would be my last choice, but once you get the correct swear words down, will work fine.

If that wood is splitting on you, sounds like it is dried out and rock hard to me.

Please disregard LOL, I read the first page and did not realize was 3 pages.
__________________
If it was easy, we would not call it work!

Last edited by funfool; 04-10-2013 at 06:44 PM. Reason: jumped to soon
funfool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 08:55 PM   #41
Wire Chewer
 
Red Squirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,221
Rewards Points: 2,020
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Well I have to say, simply predrilling holes then driving a nail in the predrilled hole makes things much easier. Using a bit that is maybe 1/2 the size of the nail, don't want to compromise the strength either. That and I nail a nail straight down on the opposite side so the joist wont move when I nail then I just remove that nail and use it to nail the other side. 3 nails per stud. Ended up not even using screws but I will need them when I get to the parts where I need to add braces to put the top plate to, when my wall will be parallel to the joists.


first few studs finally in place!


Toe nailing


Straight enough in my book! Just a crawlspace anyway.


Now quick question, for the crawlspace where I can reach the bottom and top at same time it's easy, but when I get to the basement part, how does one measure from mark to mark after using a plum bob to mark the line on top? I measure at the bottom first (easier to lay the tape down) and mark my 16" lines and any other spot where I may need a joist. I then go on top and line up the pumb bob to the line so I can mark the line on top. Then I measure from line to line. How would one do this alone for a 7 foot wall? Also is there a faster way than a plum bob to line it up? Maybe a plum bob with a laser, is there such thing? That way I can make it shorter and it wont wave around for eternity.
Red Squirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 09:27 PM   #42
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 124
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rckkrgrd View Post
Hot dipped galvanized screws and nails are recommended for treated wood of any kind but deck screws should be fine for any area thats reasonably dry. Thesame is true for nails. Do not use screws unless in a difficult nailing area. Toe nailing over your head certainly qualifies. Screws are not as strong for the same size. They are expensive and slow. A special driver or clutches are not required even with square drive. ONE HINT One of those cordless impact screwdrivers if you have one works excellent for driving long square drive screws with less stripping
Do yourself a favor and get t25 and leave the s2 at the store
jsbuilders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 10:26 PM   #43
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 103
Rewards Points: 81
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairview View Post
Bore a pilot hole a little smaller than the nail through the stud at the angle you would like the nail to follow. If counter sinking the head is necessary counter bore for it also. Use a depth stop for both operations. Can be made of a dowel rod section.

I've always heard it as toe nailing.
Lets hope he dosent take all of these suggestions we are giving him. So far he has to predrill, countersink the heads, and put bees wax on all 2000 of his fasteneres. Geeze. Oh yeah, get out your framing depth stops. Or buy a stiletto.
one cut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 10:30 PM   #44
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 124
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Hit the point of the nail one or two times to flatten it before you nail, it will help not split the wood. Or buy a framing nailer
jsbuilders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 10:34 PM   #45
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,205
Rewards Points: 1,666
Default

Is there a method to cross nailing? I seem to be no good at it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by one cut View Post
Lets hope he dosent take all of these suggestions we are giving him. So far he has to predrill, countersink the heads, and put bees wax on all 2000 of his fasteneres. Geeze. Oh yeah, get out your framing depth stops. Or buy a stiletto.
I hope you realize buildings built taking all those steps are still standing after a 100 years and those built with a high speed framing nailer, that 50 percent missed the mark, and hammer drills will be doing great if they last 20-30 years. Sometimes good things take just a little longer.

Advertisement

SeniorSitizen is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Are they good Shenandoah Cabinets good quality? robertmazzo Carpentry 74 10-02-2013 04:22 PM
re: replace asphalt driveway. best method?? gramps416 Building & Construction 12 05-24-2011 12:50 PM
Nailing ceiling drywall good or bad KarlJay Drywall & Plaster 5 10-19-2010 12:39 AM
What paints are good? bansheex Painting 12 10-03-2010 08:15 AM
Where to find good Bifold hardware & doors? smoochas Carpentry 3 07-14-2010 07:28 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts