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Old 06-13-2012, 01:49 AM   #16
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Temporary columns for a not-so-temporary fix?




Can anyone give me a step by step how to deal with this kind of joist attachment? I was thinking I could just use some kind of hanger, but it looks like I will have to notch the new joist to sit on the sill just like the old one right?
I don't quite understand the order of operations, do I jack first then install joist? Or clamp-in new joist (with adhesive applied) and then jack to proper height and then drive 3 16d nails every 16"?
Hope that makes sense, I kind of know what needs to happen just not what order to do it in.
I do know that if I'm going to raise any spots, I have to just do like a tiny bit a day to let the house adjust. But I'm more concerned with stopping further sagging than fixing the sag already there.

Not sure why, but the other end of the joists just kind of "end" butted up against the sill and their weight is basically just sitting (barely) on the stones of the foundation, not sure what they did building it this way.

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Old 06-13-2012, 06:28 AM   #17
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Temporary columns for a not-so-temporary fix?


I'd swap basements/foundations in a heartbeat. Yours looks very fixable to me. mine is upstate ny and needs everything. to start with i'd dig for a footing under that main beam where the joist is barely sitting on it, jack the main beamwith a screw lolly column then put a 6x6 under each joist end with a piece of 1/4 or 3/8 flat steel on top of the 6x6 then thru bolt to sandwich the whole assembly together. Yours is in much better shape then mine, but I think we had the same butcher do the forced air ducting, just cutting whatever was in their way to put their ducts in. As far as the horizontal cracks in the main beams, I've seen them in many older homes and they just happen but yours don't appear to be any less strong, I'd just continue to put footings in and add 6x6's, as money and labor becomes available. Good Luck , and I am jealous, wish I had that to work with! LOL
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:50 PM   #18
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Temporary columns for a not-so-temporary fix?


Thanks for the advice Ag. Don't get me wrong, I know it could be a lot LOT worse than it is! In my original post when I said $30-50k to fix, I meant to fix the whole house, I got 3 other floors built as weirdly as this basement is. I did take my engineer's consult with a grain of salt too, because they like to over-hype how bad everything is so you'll buy a full work-up from them. i.e. knocking holes in walls to see exactly how it's built (he wanted $5k+ to do that btw ). I've kind of changed my mind about doing so many sister joists, sitting at the computer I get grandiose ideas, but once I get down there I realize how much work it is and how little experience I have. I might just do a couple joists and just put in more columns in places that need it.
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Old 06-14-2012, 05:14 AM   #19
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Temporary columns for a not-so-temporary fix?


A professional engineer is not just a contractor on a fishing expedition. Actual licensed engineers have more on the line than just some fly by night contractor. They look inside walls and such because those are also part of how the structure. Don't be so quick to dismiss the idea.

Any solutions are going to have to take into consideration how the whole structure is going to be affected. As in, raising something over hear might have a lot of unintended consequences for something else way over there.
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Old 06-14-2012, 08:44 AM   #20
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Temporary columns for a not-so-temporary fix?


Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorWho View Post


Can anyone give me a step by step how to deal with this kind of joist attachment? I was thinking I could just use some kind of hanger, but it looks like I will have to notch the new joist to sit on the sill just like the old one right?
I don't quite understand the order of operations, do I jack first then install joist? Or clamp-in new joist (with adhesive applied) and then jack to proper height and then drive 3 16d nails every 16"?
Hope that makes sense, I kind of know what needs to happen just not what order to do it in.
I do know that if I'm going to raise any spots, I have to just do like a tiny bit a day to let the house adjust. But I'm more concerned with stopping further sagging than fixing the sag already there.

Not sure why, but the other end of the joists just kind of "end" butted up against the sill and their weight is basically just sitting (barely) on the stones of the foundation, not sure what they did building it this way.

how I have fixed those type of connections when sistering joists onto existing joists with a huge notch cut in them. for all joists to be sistered put blocking in every joist bay above the 2x4 ledger and against the house girder/beam. the 2x4s back then are real 2x4 (2" thick) so you will need a 1/2" of plywood and then your new 2x material added. this blocking will give you a plumb vertical surface that is flush with the front edge of the ledger board to mount hangers to. so, now sister your new joist and add a double joist hanger to hold the new sistered joist and the original joist. the new sister joists will not require the ledger notch and will go against the new blocking you just put in. I mentioned 1/2" plywood to use with the blocking but you will have to measure the thickness of the ledger there now and then figure that measurement working out with your new 2x blocking.

nail the new blocking really well, if you have questions about this procedure I will try and explain better if needed.

edit, also, re nail the original ledger to the girder really good when making the repairs.


Last edited by hand drive; 06-14-2012 at 08:48 AM.
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