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Old 02-22-2011, 10:15 PM   #1
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Tar paper underneath interior walls?


We're remodeling our bathroom, and we're changing some of the interior wall locations. On an interior wall like that, are you supposed to put a sheet of tar paper down underneath the 2x4 on the bottom of the wall, to act as moisture protection between the concrete and 2x4? We have a solid concrete foundation, no basement.

The people we had working here today started two new walls, but didn't put tar paper underneath them. I'm unsure on this, so I need to know whether we need to have them re-do it tomorrow.

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Old 02-22-2011, 10:18 PM   #2
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Tar paper underneath interior walls?


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Originally Posted by GrdLock View Post
On an interior wall like that, are you supposed to put a sheet of tar paper down underneath the 2x4 on the bottom of the wall, to act as moisture protection between the concrete and 2x4? We have a solid concrete foundation, no basement.
No, you're supposed to use pressure treated would.

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Old 02-22-2011, 11:01 PM   #3
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Tar paper underneath interior walls?


P.t. as Joe said, or; “R317.1 Location required. Protection of wood and wood based products from decay shall be provided in the following locations by the use of naturally durable wood or wood that is preservative-treated in accordance with AWPA U1 for the species, product, preservative and end use. Preservatives shall be listed in Section 4 of AWPA U1.

3. Sills and sleepers on a concrete or masonry slab that is in direct contact with the ground unless separated from such slab by an impervious moisture barrier.”
From; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...9_3_sec017.htm

So, if the house is newer and you know it has a vapor barrier under the slab….. (and can prove to the inspector)

NATURALLY DURABLEWOOD. The heartwood of the following
species with the exception that an occasional piece with
corner sapwood is permitted if 90 percent or more of the width
of each side on which it occurs is heartwood.
_Because of their natural ability to resist deterioration,
the harder portions of some species of wood are considered
to be naturally durable. The code specifies that
“occasional” sapwood is permitted if heartwood constitutes
90 percent of each side.
Decay resistant. Redwood, cedar, black locust and black
walnut.
_Redwood, cedar, black locust and black walnut lumber
are known to resist deterioration due to the action of microbes
that enter the wood fibers. The code defines
these species of lumber as being decay resistant.
Termite resistant. Redwood and Eastern red cedar.
_Redwood and eastern red cedar are considered to be
resistant to infestation by termites and are thus listed as
naturally durable. The Formosan Termite, however, is
capable of destroying all naturally durable species of
wood. From: http://www.ce.udel.edu/courses/CIEG4...%20-%20IBC.pdf


If they do replace it, add a 6mil plastic vapor barrier rather than permeable tar paper, as p.t. wood is not waterproof; http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code


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Old 02-22-2011, 11:01 PM   #4
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Tar paper underneath interior walls?


Quote:
Originally Posted by GrdLock
We're remodeling our bathroom, and we're changing some of the interior wall locations. On an interior wall like that, are you supposed to put a sheet of tar paper down underneath the 2x4 on the bottom of the wall, to act as moisture protection between the concrete and 2x4? We have a solid concrete foundation, no basement.

The people we had working here today started two new walls, but didn't put tar paper underneath them. I'm unsure on this, so I need to know whether we need to have them re-do it tomorrow.
I'm not an expert but I would defiantly have a moisture barrier between wood and concrete! Concrete can wick water through it very easily and wood will just continue to absorb it. When you think of things like mold and rotten wood whats the first thing that comes to mind... In my mind its "Water got in and couldn't get out!" why not protect your investment(brand new walls) and put a barrier down. Might be a pain in the a to go back and have the workers start over but think 5-10 years down the road, what's cheaper: doing it right the first time or doing it all over again??

That's my 2 cents.

Last edited by Gary in WA; 02-22-2011 at 11:21 PM. Reason: keep our "G" rating
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:36 PM   #5
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Tar paper underneath interior walls?


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what's cheaper: doing it right the first time or doing it all over again??

That's my 2 cents.
Doing it right is using pressure treated wood without a barrier. You can use one, but you don't need it. Millions of house's are built with pressure treated plates and no barrier.
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Old 02-25-2011, 09:22 AM   #6
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Tar paper underneath interior walls?


Pressure treated wood is the best case, however code does allow the wood to be separated from the concrete with a vapor barrier. That's most likely why you seen the tar paper under the plates. This code exception has nothing to do with having plastic under the slab. It's the vapor barrier between the framing and the concrete.
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:40 PM   #7
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Tar paper underneath interior walls?


i would use sill gasket. we don't use pt for interior framing.
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:02 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by fungku View Post
i would use sill gasket. we don't use pt for interior framing.
Most all sill sealer is also a vapor retarder. Using treated lumber also allows you to glue the plates to the floor. This really aids in keeping the walls set in place. Don't try to just use concrete nails, as your walls will not be secure enough. Tapcon screws and glue is the most secure method to install walls on concrete.

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