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Old 11-05-2010, 10:43 AM   #1
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tar paper exposed to the elements? is it fine or should it be replaced?


hi -

i'm repairing an exterior wall that currently is covered in #30 felt paper and is awaiting cedar shingles. the paper has been exposed for about one month. is it okay or should i replace it with new stuff before installing the shingles?

thanks,
mike


Last edited by mklang; 11-05-2010 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 11-05-2010, 11:42 AM   #2
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tar paper exposed to the elements? is it fine or should it be replaced?


This is simply one man's opinion, but the felt itself is probably fine. The problem that you most likely have, or will have is that it is not holding its' shape, having been exposed to the elements for that long. If it is buckling, it seems that you could take it loose, then stretch and reattach it, otherwise, you replace it, once you are ready to install the shingles.

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Old 11-05-2010, 12:05 PM   #3
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tar paper exposed to the elements? is it fine or should it be replaced?


thanks. other than being faded, it looks pretty good and is laying fairly flat because i already have the trim up. the only part that i don't like is the edges along the roof line where it seems to be wicking up water. i may just replace these sections and call it good.
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Old 11-05-2010, 12:11 PM   #4
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tar paper exposed to the elements? is it fine or should it be replaced?


If the paper is intact - no tears or gaps - it is probably serviceable. Tears can be taped and gaps can be covered with another layer. If portions of the underlying sheathing remain exposed then you don't have a vapor barrier, just a partial wall covering. Also, pay particular attention to eliminating gaps around windows, doors, and other openings to the interior. Then again, depending on your location, a vapor barrier may not be necessary. Take a look at Energy.gov, and more specifically http://www.energysavers.gov/your_hom.../mytopic=11800 for some useful guidance.

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