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-   -   Taping inside corners....one side at a time? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/taping-inside-corners-one-side-time-23394/)

yummy mummy 07-08-2008 11:22 PM

Taping inside corners....one side at a time?
 
I have been taping my inside corners, first doing one side and then the other side.

I seem to by making a little bit of a mess, right inside where the walls meet.

Should they be done one side at a time, let it dry and then do the other side?

Also, since I have never done this before, how will I know that I have done a half decent job taping and mudding before I put the primer on?

I have taken a lamp and put it on the wall to check for any imperfections.
I have done 4 coats on everything including the screws. I have lightly sanded and looks and feels smooth to me.

How will I know if when I put the primer and then paint whether I will see any imperfections?

Thanks

tigerbalm2424 07-09-2008 06:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 137358)
I have been taping my inside corners, first doing one side and then the other side.

I seem to by making a little bit of a mess, right inside where the walls meet.

Should they be done one side at a time, let it dry and then do the other side?

Also, since I have never done this before, how will I know that I have done a half decent job taping and mudding before I put the primer on?

I have taken a lamp and put it on the wall to check for any imperfections.
I have done 4 coats on everything including the screws. I have lightly sanded and looks and feels smooth to me.

How will I know if when I put the primer and then paint whether I will see any imperfections?

Thanks

Although I cant answer your question, I can say that I just finised priming my entire basement (first tape/mud job ever) and I did it the same way.....one side and then the other and made a mess of the joint and corners when attempting the second side...:mad:

Needless to say its going on my lessons learned list....along with not using metal prepapered corner bead again, next time it will be plain metal.

I did the light trick looking from both a horizontal and vertical perspective for all joints. Primed it and it looks good (NOTE: gotta love flat primer!, NOT, its hiding too much that I know will come out with eggshell)

AtlanticWBConst. 07-09-2008 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yummy mummy (Post 137358)
I have been taping my inside corners, first doing one side and then the other side.

I seem to by making a little bit of a mess, right inside where the walls meet.

Should they be done one side at a time, let it dry and then do the other side?

Also, since I have never done this before, how will I know that I have done a half decent job taping and mudding before I put the primer on?

I have taken a lamp and put it on the wall to check for any imperfections.
I have done 4 coats on everything including the screws. I have lightly sanded and looks and feels smooth to me.

How will I know if when I put the primer and then paint whether I will see any imperfections?

Thanks

1.) Apply coat of mud to one side of corner. When scooping the mud out of the tray, hawk, whatever, scoop, so that slightly more mud is on the 6" knife's side that faces the actual corner.
2.) Apply in even, smooth, long strokes.
3.) Once approximately 1/2 the corner's height is covered, smooth it.
4.) Feather the outside edge.
5.) Go back and wipe the opposing side (non-coated) side. In other words, remove excess compound from it.
6.) Rewipe the coated side to smooth it out. Apply less coating pressure to the interior of the corner.
7.) Do the whole length of the corner.
8.) Allow to dry.
9.) When dry, go back and use your 6" knife to scrape any ridges, or excess compound down. Do the same on the non-coated side.
10.) When ready, repeat the same steps to the second side of the corner.
11.) Clean the opposing side of excess compound (coated the first time), as you go.
12.) Allow to dry.
13.) Newbi: Use a drywall sanding sponge to sand.
14.) Use a bright halogen light to inspect the area. Shine the light at various angles to determine if any imperfections exist, sand these as you go.
15.) Once the areas are sanded, go back with you 6" knife and compound, and "touch-up" holes, knicks, waves, gulleys, etc.
16.) Allow these to dry.
17.) Go back one last time to sand the touch-up areas slightly.
18.) If your coating work requires another round of touch-up and sanding, so be it, you are the one that will have to stare at it, and live with it, so knock yourself out with the detail work.

Last tip: I have stated this before, the key to properly taping inside corners is also the way the 6" knife is held. Make an "L" with your thumb and index finger, like you are placing your hand over your fore-head to indicate that you are a complete loser. That is the way you hold a 6" knife all the time, when coating (it's NOT like you are holding torch, or an ice cream cone).

Your thumb allows you to apply pressure on one edge of the knife, your index finger allows you to apply pressure on the oppsing side of the knife. This is also the way a 12" coating knife is held and used. The knive's blades are flexible (newbis generally don't view it this way). This is how you control the amount of compound you apply, and wipe off, when you are coating drywall. This is "KEY" to learning how to properly and professionally coat.

Good Luck.

Termite 07-09-2008 07:45 AM

I do it like Atlantic said, one side at a time.

Another handy tip for DIYers is to use a large sponge slightly moistened to smooth things out. It isn't a total substitute for sanding but it really helps those of us that don't mud and tape on a daily basis.

yummy mummy 07-09-2008 08:33 AM

Thanks everyone for your helpful tips.

Now I know why my corners are not really good. Actually, considering that I did them wrong, they are pretty good. :laughing:

I will do one side at a time and let dry and then the other.

yummy mummy 07-09-2008 08:43 AM

atlantic
 
Atlantic, thanks for the wonderful detailed explanation.

I did have a good laugh when you mentioned the L on my forehead:laughing:

That is exactly how I hold my knife. I did do a lot of reading before attempting taping and mudding. I have learned to control the knife pretty well. And I find that the more I do it, the better I become at it.

I have finished a small room, which is my "practice" room. My larger area will be much easier. :)

I was not aware that I could go back and touch up and fill in as needed.
That is a good thing.

Thanks for your help.

I am seeing a light at the end of the tunnel.

Before I started taping, I thought that it would not be as difficult as it is.
Actually, I don't mean difficult, I mean annoying.

I don't actually hate it, but I don't love it.
If I ever have any advice for anyone when hanging drywall:

HANG THE LARGEST PIECE OF DRYWALL THAT YOU CAN. HAVE THE LEAST SEAMS POSSIBLE.

(Unlike myself, where the ceiling has a seam every 16 inches) :eek:
But I do love textured ceilings:whistling2:

AtlanticWBConst. 07-09-2008 08:59 AM

Good For you!

We are all looking forward to the completed Project Pictures.

4just1don 07-09-2008 09:20 AM

gee I MUST be the complete loser,,,I use a corner trowel,,,works for me.

My MAIN problem with taping is "OVER" sanding between coats,,any CURES for that?? LOL

came a LONG way from my 'first' drywall job,,back in the days of durabond 90,,tough sanding that crap!!(BTW needed ALOT of texture to cover that up,,and it was ugly!!)

I am a POOR texturer so leave everything 'smooth' these days,,,any texturing tips for the 'needy'???

yummy mummy 07-09-2008 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4just1don (Post 137432)
gee I MUST be the complete loser,,,I use a corner trowel,,,works for me.

My MAIN problem with taping is "OVER" sanding between coats,,any CURES for that?? LOL

came a LONG way from my 'first' drywall job,,back in the days of durabond 90,,tough sanding that crap!!(BTW needed ALOT of texture to cover that up,,and it was ugly!!)

I am a POOR texturer so leave everything 'smooth' these days,,,any texturing tips for the 'needy'???

I don't sand between coats. I use all purpose compound, that I thin down with water. When dry and before I put on another coat all I do is just knock any ridges off and just run it along so that it is relatively smooth.
I think what works for me is that my mud is probably thinner than most people would use, but I find that I can work with it better that way and my coats are smoother. I just sand after my final coat. (My final being 4 coats) I find that 4 coats gives me an almost professional look, if I do say so myself. :laughing:

As to texture; I did my ceiling texture by hand with a 4 inch knife, and thinned down compound. I did a heavier version of spanish knife. I like the way it turned out.
You can also apply compound to a small area and then use a sea sponge and continue on for the whole ceiling or wall.

I have discovered that you pretty much can do anything with compound.

Good luck.
I would love to see pics

yummy mummy 07-09-2008 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. (Post 137426)
Good For you!

We are all looking forward to the completed Project Pictures.

I plan on finishing in a "dramatic" way. After all this time, I think I deserve drama as my finished product, what do you think Atlantic?

bjbatlanta 07-23-2008 02:23 PM

Always thin the mud and a little shot of Joy dish soap. It even helps smooth out the durabond, though the newer EZ sand setting compounds aren't as big of a deal. And yes, always one side of the angle at a time and be sure the other side is completely dry or it will "rake" out.


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