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Old 02-13-2010, 09:19 PM   #1
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


I'm installing an additional hose bib in the center of my yard. The piping will be PVC. I'm trying to figure out the best way to support the vertical section of pipe which will contain the faucet. One idea was to clamp it to a steel stake driven into the ground. Another idea was to encase the pipe in a circular concrete structure or make a concrete structure to clamp the pipe to. The faucet won't be very far off the ground - maybe 1 - 2' high.

Any suggestions?

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Old 02-13-2010, 10:00 PM   #2
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


b_c,

Is there a reason you can't use a frost free yard hydrant? (You can google the term.)

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Old 02-13-2010, 10:48 PM   #3
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


Rory - no reason although I cannot ever recall seeing anything like that around here. I'm in San Diego where freezing temps are rarely an issue. Today for example high at about 75 and low around 50.
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Old 02-13-2010, 11:24 PM   #4
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


I am in SD as well (Escondido). I have a hose bib in the midst of the back yard similar as you describe, made of PVC, etc. I simply drove two 2' pieces of rebar into the ground on either side, and secured the rebar and PVC pipe together with a couple three heavy plastic tie-wraps.

Home Depot has short pieces of rebar ready cut - I find them handy to have around.
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Old 02-13-2010, 11:36 PM   #5
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


Thanks vsheetz - I'm south of you in Scripps Ranch. Regarding the rebar have you had any corrosion on them. That's one reason I'm a bit reluctant to use steel for this. If I were using steel I would probably go to a steel yard (there is one in Escondido in fact) and get some steel pipe. Galvanized would probably resist corrosion. I have a metal 4x6 bandsaw which is great for cutting all kinds of metal including rebar. I have plenty of rebar sitting around as I needed them for other parts of the project. It is much cheaper to get the long pieces and cut them yourself - the pre-cut small pieces are very expensive in proportion to the size.
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:13 AM   #6
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


You don't want PVC coming up out of the ground. PVC will degrade over time in sun light, plus it would be suceptable to physical damage (kicking, tripping, weed whacker, etc).

While still underground, transition to copper.


For protection (both physical damage and any once in a blue moon freeze), you should have the PVC pipe burried 10" to 12" deep. While still at that depth, use a standard male threaded PVC adapter and a female threaded copper adapter. Continue the run of copper for 6" to 12", then use a copper elbow to turn and come up out of the ground.

If there is ever a chance you might get freezing temperature, you could stop short of coming up out of the ground and instead use a quick connect installed underground in a 6" or 8" round valve box.
http://www.rainbird.com/landscape/pr...ckcoupling.htm
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

To install a valve box, simply dig a hole the depth of the valve box plus 4 more inches. Line the bottom of the hole with 4" of gravel. Place the box on top of the gravel, and add enough gravel around any opening (to avoid loose soil from entering while backfilling the hole).

If you NEVER have to worry about a freeze, then just extend the copper above ground. 10" to 12" depth soil packed tight around the copper pipe will hold it in place very nicely. By transitioning to copper well before the 90 degree elbow, the PVC to copper connection will be protected from damage should someone accidently hit the copper pipe.

Yes, this will mean that you will either need to learn to sweat copper pipe (not a difficult thing to do) or find a friend that knows how to sweat copper pipe to assymbol the copper pieces for you ahead of time. If you assymbol all the copper ahead of time.


IMHO, this is more of a lawn care or irrigation question.
This web site had a lawn care forum:
http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/
A good forum for DIYer with irrigation questions is here:
http://www.sprinklertalk.com/wbb/index.php

Last edited by HooKooDooKu; 02-14-2010 at 12:27 AM.
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:28 AM   #7
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


Thanks for the detailed reply and links. You're correct that it is more of a irrigation question and in fact the hose bib is part of an irrigation system that does include valves and 3 different zones for irrigation. The hose bib is a side branch of the main irrigation system - just something that could be useful in certain situations.

I guess I could use copper instead of PVC for the reasons mentioned. I've done plenty of projects that involve sweating copper and so using copper is not an issue.
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Old 02-14-2010, 01:32 AM   #8
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


Yeah, rebar stuck in the ground will probably eventually rust some years in the future. When that happens I'll pound in a couple new ones.

My hose bib has been in place for maybe 20 years. I did have to redo the PVC several years ago, because it was run over by a truck - copper or any other pipe would not have survived either... (and would have been more work to repair).
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Old 02-14-2010, 02:18 AM   #9
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Also I thought that there was some kind of paint for PVC pipe to prevent it from degrading in the sun.
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Old 02-14-2010, 11:30 AM   #10
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


I get it that the "frost free" part is more or less useless where you live, but wouldn't a hydrant just be the easy one step way to go?
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:09 PM   #11
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


If there was a need to go below the frost line, I agree a frost free yard hydrant would be a good way to go - but in SoCal it is not a need and the frost free yard hydrant cost in the $50-$100 range. I think the simplest and cheapest and easiest is as hose bib on a piece of PVC as the OP proposed, anchored to a couple metal or wooden stakes - or if more secure and lasting is desired drop a bag of ready-mix concrete around it. Alternatively use galvanized pipe to come out of the ground if exposing PVC to sunlight or damage from a weed-wacker is thought to be an issue.
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:21 PM   #12
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


In regards to PVC and sunlight damage, I think we are talking many years here, like 15-20+ years.

MY parents have PVC faucets above ground and it has yet to break or become unusable.

We do drain it each year, but it has been installed since I was living there.
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Old 02-14-2010, 01:40 PM   #13
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Ok. Apparently I can't let this go.

If a pre-fab yard hydrant is too extravangant (less than $50), build a simple one with length of galvanized threaded pipe, spigot/hose bib valve on top, buried elbow connecting to whatever you are running the water with underground. Pipe is cheap, rigid, and will take multiple whacks with the lawn mower, etc., without falling over. And it won't look like a duct tape job when you are done.

Yes it will corrode in 20 years.
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Last edited by Rory Read; 02-14-2010 at 01:41 PM. Reason: I can't type
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Old 02-14-2010, 11:58 PM   #14
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


I guess I'm not clear on how a hydrant works and what it offers over the hose bib.

Anyway I went ahead and just used PVC as originally planned. I will probably do something along the lines of what vsheetz has done for supporting the pipe. I will either encase the last run of the pipe and elbow as well as the supports in either concrete or some sand mixed with portland cement (and then wet for hardening).

btw I was in Escondido today at the Harborfreight to buy one of their rotary hammer SDS drills.
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Old 02-15-2010, 02:09 AM   #15
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Supporting exterior free standing PVC pipe with Faucet


Quote:
Originally Posted by blue_can View Post
I guess I'm not clear on how a hydrant works and what it offers over the hose bib.
Primarily it extends the actual water shut off valve to the bottom of the shaft of the hydrant - and thus below the frost line to prevent water line freezing and freeze pipe breakage. They are available in differing lengths/depths - 2', 4', etc.

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