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Old 10-25-2012, 05:04 PM   #1
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supporting existing structure


I have a barn hay storage area that is 50' long by 11.5' wide with support frames every 10'. The current structure has rough cut 2.5" x 6" oak joists that are 2' apart. These are supported by support beams which are 2.5" x 6" oak nailed into 6"x6" posts, 10' apart. I expect to load 200 bales weighing about 60# each (12000#) of hay into this storage area. Given that I cannot change the joists and can only reinforce the support frames, I'm trying to determine what size support beams should be used if I nail the new support beams into the existing rough cut oak beams.

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Old 10-25-2012, 06:16 PM   #2
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supporting existing structure


pratt,

welcome to the forum!

to properly evaluate a structure you need to see all existing conditions and load paths, it requires an on-site visit and evaluation. this is something you can not expect someone on an online forum to be able to do, since we are here and you are there. it's more than just determining if a beam with support an imposed load or not.

what have you been able to store in that area in the past?

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Old 10-25-2012, 09:38 PM   #3
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supporting existing structure


Gary, Thanks for the reply.

I've stored 200 bales of hay (~12000#) in the loft for the last 2 years. and in fact have about 180 bales (~10800#) up there right now.

I just noticed in the last week that one of the 3x6 Oak support frames attached to the center post is cracking. I've moved the hay directly over the center support frame to the outside portion of the hay loft to hopefully lessen the weight on the center support frames.

I've attached a drawing of the hayloft design.
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File Type: pdf Hayloft drawing.pdf (92.5 KB, 33 views)
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:53 PM   #4
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supporting existing structure


can you replace the support frame that is cracking? if you cannot find the oak to replace it with you might try equal size southern pine or douglas fir. southern pine and doug fir are typically stronger than white or red oak (don't know which you have).

of course I'm winging it here as I have not seen exactly how it is constructed and how the loads are transferred. I'm just trying to find a solution for you to replace the damaged piece.

if you cannot find 3x6 then use double 2x6
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