Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-07-2010, 11:16 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 0
Share |
Default

support question


so I have an unusual situation in my basement. I have an older house '55, when built there was a rare metal suport system in place in one area with the intention of creating an area to put a pool table and play it comfortably. This span is 16 feet between the foundation and the first pole that is properly footed. The beam consists of 3 2x10's. Everywhere else in the basement, where there are 3 2x10's the spacing between posts is 8' In my mind I am missing a column. The problem is that I cannot assume I have a footer in place to put a column back in on. I am not liking the look of this old support system. Does it make any sense to build a 2x6 wall under this "beam" and remove the aging "sling" type support system. the couple other pieces of info I can offer is that there is wall above this beam that supports the ceiling of that room. As far as I can tell this wall does not support the roof at all. think ranch, then beam and wall perpendicular to the foundation. thanks

endoftheline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2010, 09:13 AM   #2
STAFF
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 7,406
Rewards Points: 30
Blog Entries: 1
Default

support question


Building a wall under the support beam would give you more support for sure and if you can live with a wall there that would be one way to give you peace of mind. If you can access the beam you could add another 2X10 on each side of it with plywood sandwiched between which would for sure carry the load. Does the beam have any swag in it now?

Another option is to cut the concrete out where the post would be installed, dig and pour a pier pad, put in your post and there you go.

Jim

BigJim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2010, 04:59 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Jim, thanks for the response. I cannot acces the beam sides the way things are now so adding does not seem like an option. I am wondering how common it would be to do something like this, and have a wall under the beam instead of a post. does that ever happen in modern construction. is it ever planned that way? ohh, and there is very little if any deflection in it now. is there a standard span that 3 2x10's covers? thanks
endoftheline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2010, 06:48 PM   #4
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,968
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


  • 1. How long are the floor joists on either side of the beam?
  • 2. How long are the ceiling joists on each side of the wall upstairs? (to the outside walls)
  • 3. Are the ceiling plaster and lath?
  • 4. Is any of the roof system resting on the wall in the attic---- struts with purlins? Page #39: http://books.google.com/books?id=iwS...joists&f=false

Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2010, 06:59 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Gary, the answer to 1 and 2 is 15 feet. the answer to 3 is drywall, double thick, the answer to 4 is no. any insight you could provide would be great. thanks.
endoftheline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2010, 03:01 PM   #6
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,968
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


With a 15’ span carrying and bearing on the center wall (not continuous) x 40# floor load = 600# x 16’ beam span = 9600# PLUS the ceiling load above15’ span x 15# load (dead and live) = 3600# = 13,200# And the 3-2x10’s are rated (Doug/fir, 1500fb) to carry 6200#. Add the post. Using a ”concrete bit in a drill or rotor-hammer set on drill, locate the footing and fill the extra holes with caulking or grout. Use post base and cap on each end: http://www.strongtie.com/products/ca...ost_bases.html
http://www.strongtie.com/products/ca...post_caps.html

Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2010, 03:23 PM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Gary, thanks for taking the time to help me. It is appreciated. the thing is, I do not know if there is a footer. There is no evidence to suggest that there ever was a post there. I thought about probing around to look for a footing, but did not want to chance weakening the slab. Do you think it would? Would I have to assume there was a footing if the bit was still working say more than 4 inches or so deep? Also, I was wondering, If I cannot find a footing, how big of a hole could I need to have cut to pour a proper one? Thanks a Lot -marc
endoftheline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2010, 03:49 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,590
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Marc, what is the nature of the metal structure? Why do you think it's inadequate? If they bothered to put in a metal structure it's not unreasonable to assume they engineered it properly.
jogr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2010, 05:42 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Hello, it is two long metal rods with a turnbuckle adjustment in it attached with metal plates to each end of said beam. I also want it removed as it goes under the beam by about 6 inches and is in the way of bulding a wall there. thanks
endoftheline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2010, 05:54 PM   #10
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,968
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Could you please post a picture?

Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2010, 06:50 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Here is the big problem. the old support was removed about 7 years ago by my dumb a&*! I have a heavy duty telescoping post in the middle of the span instead and things have been fine. But after some exposure to new constuction over the last few years during my day job, I now know what I did is wrong, unless maybe there is a footing. In my younger more stupid mind back then, I said to myself, whats stronger than concrete? now I understand footers. Last week, I built a 2x6 wall inder the beam up to my temporary pole, which is 8 feet of the span for piece of mind. I actually had a structuaral engineer come by and he recommended a 2 x 6 wall as a fix, but I just want some other opionions before I finish it and finally put this issue to rest in my mind. When I put the post in I was able to lift the beam about a 1/4 inch to the point where the other support was no longer tensioned. In fact, there was very little tension on the existing support system back then it seemed, which is why I wanted it out. Bottom line, yes very stupid what I did, and I am lucky. Now I want it fixed right so that I can sleep again. thanks
endoftheline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2010, 07:18 PM   #12
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,968
Rewards Points: 0
Default

support question


Leave the post in place. The wall doesn't have the proper footing to carry the load, or does it? A S.E. said to build a wall? How did he/she establish the slab/footing thickness? Without the post, it is double the safe span with the load. (Very dangerous)
Make sure the post is as wide as the metal bracket/cap to fully support the whole width of the beam. Positive tie the post --- top and bottom to whatever it's on. If wood, elevate the post 1" in a post base to satisfy code. If metal, use concrete anchors, wedge anchors, tap-cons or similar.

Be safe, Gary

__________________
If any ads are present in my answer above, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed, they are there against my permission.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Basement support post failure fetzer85 Building & Construction 15 05-09-2010 10:35 PM
need help on repairing rotted deck support ga1990 Building & Construction 6 11-07-2008 07:32 PM
Furnace Maintenance Question lmeagher HVAC 1 10-15-2008 03:53 PM
hrv question indep HVAC 3 07-17-2008 10:39 PM
Basement vapor barrier question rob7young Remodeling 2 04-13-2008 09:10 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.