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shazapple 06-01-2012 11:20 AM

Support for end of built up beam
 
1 Attachment(s)
We are putting an addition onto our house, and have come across a question regarding the basement beam. The original basement is rock and mortar, and has a 40" opening for acess. It just so happens that the built up beam for the new section ends directly above it.

Attachment 51775

Obviously we can't just put a post there, so our designer suggested pouring a concrete wall against the stone wall, with the beam resting on top of a concrete encased metal lintel. What are some other options people have come across? I'm just looking to see if this is a common problem that is covered by the NBC or by a pre-engineered solution before consulting a structural engineer.

hand drive 06-01-2012 11:57 AM

a pic of the actual opening showing framing above it will help a bunch. a metal lintel looks like the best idea, no real good way to hanger a quad 2x10 beam to anything. maybe a couple of brick piers added on either side of the opening with the lintel spanning across the opening. depending on how tall the opening is you could even span a header from pier to pier across the opening and set the quad on top of it.

shazapple 06-01-2012 12:51 PM

I thought about the pier idea, maybe even pour concrete piers? The existing opening is already quite short (Probably 6') so if we put a beam below it would be a head bonker. Simpson does make a hanger for quad 2x10 http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...ace_ss-df2.asp so that might be an idea?

Gary in WA 06-01-2012 02:26 PM

If storage space and need the headroom on entering, add another beam (4' long or so) next to (30" away) the existing (parallel) with the wall end on a new pier next to the wall. This would required new sistered joists on the shorter span side.

Gary

tony.g 06-01-2012 05:00 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Something like this any use?

hand drive 06-02-2012 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shazapple (Post 933863)
I thought about the pier idea, maybe even pour concrete piers? The existing opening is already quite short (Probably 6') so if we put a beam below it would be a head bonker. Simpson does make a hanger for quad 2x10 http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...ace_ss-df2.asp so that might be an idea?

That hanger looks like a possibility, support piers and a new beam to hanger the quad to may still be required if the existing framing lumber there now going over the 40" opening is not sufficient to hold the weight of the hangered 2x10 quad beam. Or if you cannot add in new structural framing to the existing 40" span to bring it up to size requirement to handle the weight . the 12 gauge hanger would certainly be the one to use.


Quote:

Originally Posted by tony.g (Post 933998)
Something like this any use?

That diagram is the exact way to do it, just make sure the header is up into the floor system so it does not stick down into door opening area.

shazapple 06-02-2012 09:41 PM

Thanks tony, that is exactly what I was envisioning! I think you and hand drive are right on with the pier idea. The existing opening is spanned by a 7x7 beam, so I think the pier system would be better than trying to hang the new beam on the old. Could the piers be concrete?

The offset parallel beam is a good idea, but the wall above the beam is load bearing, so I'd rather keep it continuous.

hand drive 06-02-2012 11:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shazapple (Post 934834)
Thanks tony, that is exactly what I was envisioning! I think you and hand drive are right on with the pier idea. The existing opening is spanned by a 7x7 beam, so I think the pier system would be better than trying to hang the new beam on the old. Could the piers be concrete?

The offset parallel beam is a good idea, but the wall above the beam is load bearing, so I'd rather keep it continuous.

there are many types of piers that could work. probably the most simple is to have a nice footer established and then dry stack #4 solid concrete blocks ( 4"x8"x16") in an interwoven design creating a 16"x16" or 24"x24" pier and then use sure wall (fiberglass reenforced concrete ) to skim coat the piers and hold them together and it gives the piers a concrete/stucco type look.

a concrete expert would have to comment on a fully formed concrete pier, though it actually seems no different than above except one is dry stacked and the other is liquid with wood forms holding in the liquid.


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