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Old 01-01-2007, 06:05 PM   #1
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Subfloor question


A termite inspector, who completed an inspection of a house we are considering buying, told the realtor the house had 3 subfloors. She said he told her it was one of the "best built houses he'd ever seen."

What does it mean that there's that much subfloor?

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Old 01-01-2007, 06:34 PM   #2
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Subfloor question


He was meaning the layers of plywood or material before the actuall flooring was laid down.

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Old 01-01-2007, 07:03 PM   #3
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Subfloor question


Unless the inspector opened up some walls and floors, he knows only a little about the level of quality of the construciton of the house. I know of no advantage of multiple subfloors and would consider that a possible indication of structural repair or floor leveling after settlement of the structure. I would ask a qualified house inspector to determine the condition of the house and ignore the opinion of the termite inspector or the realtor.
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Old 01-01-2007, 10:06 PM   #4
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Subfloor question


Here is a good example of "realtor BS" No one builds a house with three subfloors. This has nothing to do with a strong house, it is an indication of damage to each original subfloor that was bad enough to require a new subfloor before reflooring. I would make this a specific area of concern for my home inspector to check out (water damage, termite damage, undersized, sagging floor joists). While on home inspectors, stay away from ones that are liked by the realtors in the area. They usually provide lots of "fluff" in the form of trivial problems, but are often not as interested in pointing out the depth of suspected problems that could break the deal. A couple of these kinds of reports gets them a reputation among sales agents as "deal breakers", and will severly curtail their supply of recommendations.
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Old 01-02-2007, 04:18 AM   #5
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Subfloor question


Quote:
Originally Posted by troubleseeker View Post
Here is a good example of "realtor BS" No one builds a house with three subfloors. This has nothing to do with a strong house, it is an indication of damage to each original subfloor that was bad enough to require a new subfloor before reflooring. I would make this a specific area of concern for my home inspector to check out (water damage, termite damage, undersized, sagging floor joists). While on home inspectors, stay away from ones that are liked by the realtors in the area. They usually provide lots of "fluff" in the form of trivial problems, but are often not as interested in pointing out the depth of suspected problems that could break the deal. A couple of these kinds of reports gets them a reputation among sales agents as "deal breakers", and will severly curtail their supply of recommendations.
Agreed as well....sounds like either BS, ...........
or if there, are in fact, '3' layers of subfloor = damaged layers were possibly 'gone' over (Layered over).

Normal house building: Sub floor: one layer of 3/4" CDX fir plywood. (tho, we prefer to use Advantek flooring sheets)
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Old 01-03-2007, 07:15 AM   #6
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Subfloor question


I have run into one house with 3 layers of subfloor. I did a kitchen
remodel on a small mansion in upstate new york many years ago.
The subfloor was 2 layers of 1x4 T&G diagonally opposed, with a straight
layer on top.

That said, the advice above is right on the money. This type
of construction is VERY rare and you need to have the subfloor
inspected closely. I've only seen it once in 30 years...it's not
standard construction practice and never has been.

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