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Old 07-03-2008, 03:50 PM   #16
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Stucco over Foam Board?


I apreciate your taking the time to read it and comment on it.I wanted to do the DRyvit but they wouldnt sell me the stuff said I had to be a factory trained rep to use it.I went to the local masonary store and they sold me on thr conpro flrx said it would hold up very well in Pa. conditions.I may get the chance to find out someday when it stops raining or I may coat the ark with it

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Old 01-15-2009, 06:45 PM   #17
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Stucco over Foam Board?


Since this is a DIY forum & EIFS (synthetic stucco over insulating board) manufacturers/suppliers all seem to insist upon "professional installation" & charging a great deal more than they should, I'll describe my own experiences with it.

Seven years ago I concluded that the fake lapboard siding of my mid-70's era stick-built home here in Eastern Idaho was getting too ugly to paint again & also that it'd be good idea to add some insulation - a perfect EIFS scenario. At that time, 2" thick beadboard sold for about 25 cents per square foot, local insulation shops/lumber yards wouldn't sell their EIFS "systems" to amateurs & the pros were charging about $3.50/sq ft to install the stuff. Since my review of the relevant technical literature (I'm a chemist by profession) suggested that an acryllic-fortified thinset (eg. Walmart's "Versabond" - $15/50 #sack) would probably work just fine as a "stucco" I decided to give it a try: I stripped off the old lapboard siding (subsequently ripped into stove-sized chunks & used as home-heating fuel), tacked up full-sized sheets of 2" bead board with some 4" twisted-shank galvanized nails & homemade galvanized steel washers (approx 1.5 inch squares with their corners turned down to bite into the foam), stetched plastic-coated fiber glass stucco mesh over the foam & tacked it down with more nails/washers (into the studs), & then troweled on an approximately 1/6" thick layer (one bag/sheet) of white "Versabond" (just one layer). Since I didn't know where to put expansion joints, I didn't bother with them 'cept at the corners - which are covered with 3" by 2", L-shaped, white painted galvanized steel flashing nailed to the wall on its 3" side & free to slide on the other. Since I didn't want to change (or move) the original windows/doors, the foamboard running along their tops was slightly undercut to form a drip edge & that under their bottoms tapered off at 45 degrees to facilitate rain runoff.

The bottom line is that this "system" has worked just fine - no cracks (my biggest seamless surface/wall (no windows, etc.) is 30' by 10' & the stuff has undergone roughly a thousand freeze/thaw cycles since it was installed), my house is significantly quieter (less road/wind noise) & much cheaper to heat/cool, it doesn't have to be painted, "dings" are easily fixed - and it cost me less than 30% as much as a "pro" would have charged. Another handy feature is that you can make up your own trim etc by carving a thin sheet of foamboard into whatever shapes you like (cover with a contrasting colored stucco).

The downside is that you can't sue anybody if you screw up.

Last edited by dsiemer; 01-15-2009 at 07:10 PM. Reason: mispelling
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Old 01-15-2009, 06:58 PM   #18
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Stucco over Foam Board?


Since this is a DIY forum & EIFS (synthetic stucco over insulating board) manufacturers/suppliers all seem to insist upon "professional installation" & charging a great deal more than they should, I'll describe my own experiences with it.

Seven years ago I concluded that the fake lapboard siding of my mid-70's era stick-built home here in Eastern Idaho was getting too ugly to paint again & also that it'd be good idea to add some insulation - a perfect EIFS scenario. At that time, 2" thick beadboard sold for about 25 cents per square foot, local insulation shops/lumber yards wouldn't sell their EIFS "systems" to amateurs & the pros were charging about $3.50/sq ft to install the stuff. Since my review of the relevant technical literature (I'm a chemist by profession) suggested that an acryllic-fortified thinset (eg. Walmart's "Versabond" - $15/50 #sack) would probably work just fine as a "stucco" I decided to give it a try: I stripped off the old lapboard siding (subsequently ripped into stove-sized chunks & used as home-heating fuel), tacked up full-sized sheets of 2" bead board with some 4" twisted-shank galvanized nails & homemade galvanized steel washers (approx 1.5 inch squares with their corners turned down to bite into the foam), stetched plastic-coated fiber glass stucco mesh over the foam & tacked it down with more nails/washers (into the studs), & then troweled on an approximately 1/6" thick layer (one bag/sheet) of white "Versabond" (just one layer). Since I didn't know where to put expansion joints, I didn't bother with them 'cept at the corners - which are covered with 3" by 2", L-shaped, white painted galvanized steel flashing nailed to the wall on its 3" side & free to slide on the other. Since I didn't want to change (or move) the original windows/doors, the foamboard running along their tops was slightly undercut to form a drip edge & that under their bottoms tapered off at 45 degrees to facilitate rain runoff.

The bottom line is that this "system" has worked just fine - no cracks (my biggest seamless surface/wall (no windows, etc.) is 30' by 10' & the stuff has undergone roughly a thousand freeze/thaw cycles since it was installed), my house is significantly quieter (less road/wind noise) & much cheaper to heat/cool, it doesn't have to be painted, "dings" are easily fixed - and it cost me less than 30% as much as a "pros" would have charged. Another handy feature is that you can make up your own trim etc by carving a thin sheet of foamboard into whatever shapes you like (cover with a contrasting colored stucco).

The downside is that you can't sue anybody if you screw up.
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Old 01-15-2009, 07:53 PM   #19
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Stucco over Foam Board?


What you can do yourself with a self-designed "system" is one thing. What a supplier/manufacturer can and should sell you or even tell you is a different kettle of fish.

I do not advise customers on methods of construction, period. If you know what you need, I am more than happy to help you, but if you do not, and can not estimate quantities required (from stated coverages on literature), then you will probably not be satisfied with your shopping experience with me. I do not even give contractor references except for commercial construction, and then only on faxed company letterhead requests.

This is a direct result of litigation.

Online, I do not mind giving advice, since there is no legal recourse.

To the OP, one coat systems work well, but you must realize that any deficiency in application and detailing will cause damage that is not readily apparent (but very, very expensive to remediate), often for many years. This is especially true for areas outside of the Southwest.

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