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Old 01-22-2014, 11:45 AM   #16
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structural strength advice needed


I see a few problems here. 1 your taking advice from pure strangers with whom you have zero recourse to go back on when this disater for youtube happens.2 my calculations say at 1718.72 pounds is over half a ton of water. I have to laugh every time some one comes up with ideas like this. Consult a structual enginer so when your thing fails you can at least say to some one you said it would work. and have them pay the damages. 3 thing I really do not think your insurance company will cover you on water damage when this fails. so with that said good luck.

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Old 01-22-2014, 11:58 AM   #17
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structural strength advice needed


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Originally Posted by Nailbags View Post
my calculations say at 1718.72 pounds is over half a ton of water.

Where did you learn math?
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Old 01-22-2014, 04:45 PM   #18
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structural strength advice needed


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Where did you learn math?
Well highty tighty wanker I meant say almost over half a ton. so sod off.
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Old 01-22-2014, 04:51 PM   #19
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structural strength advice needed


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Well highty tighty wanker I meant say almost over half a ton. so sod off.

This gets worse! do you actually know how many pounds there are in a ton??
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Old 01-22-2014, 05:46 PM   #20
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structural strength advice needed


I'm not sure where you are coming up with 1,700+ lbs of water, which is actually over 3/4 of a ton (unless you're talking about a metric ton, which is 2,204.62 lbs).

The mattress size is 48W"x84L"x8H" (more like 7"H, but I was being conservative).
Volume is equal to L x W x H . For this particular case, we're going to come up with a result in cubic inches (cu in) because the given measurements are in inches. If we do the math (48" x 84" x 8"), the answer is 32,256 cu in. We can now convert 32,256 cu in to cubic feet (cu ft) by dividing 32,256 by 1,728 because there are 1,728 cu in per cu ft. The result of the math is 18.67 cu ft. Because there are 7.48 gallons per cu ft, we can then come up with the number of gallons by multiplying 7.48 x 18.67, which is 139.65 gallons. To obtain a weight for this amount of water, multiply the number of gallons by 8.345, which is the weight of a gallon of water. The total weight of the water comes out to be 1,165.38 lbs.

I'm not one to look for someone else to blame should a project that I am undertaking happen to fail. If it fails, it's on me. I don't take any response from any person other than Jesus Christ as being truth. I do the research and go from there. Judging from the response that tony.g provided, it sounded to me like he is pretty knowledgeable. I then looked at his profile, which tells me that he is an engineer. I then did some research into lumber span strength determination and charts, which led me to believe that tony.g isn't just some dufus handing out bogus information for kicks.

If the waterbed fails at 5' or 1', I wouldn't think that it would make any difference to the insurance company; 140 gallons of water is 140 gallons of water. If it breaks, I'll get out a mop and a squeegee and clean up the mess.

I'm glad that you find some humor in my project. We all need a good laugh..... it's good medicine!
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Old 01-22-2014, 06:27 PM   #21
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structural strength advice needed


Some of the older slabs are only 2" thick..... post loads; http://www2.wwpa.org/Portals/9/docs/PDF/TN9.pdf

Use plenty of diagonal bracing, it is totally top-heavy.

Gary
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Old 01-22-2014, 07:55 PM   #22
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structural strength advice needed


The house was built in 1994........ cannot say how thick the slab is. I will definitely be devising a way to spread out the load of each column.

Any detailed bracing recommendations would be awesome. The columns will not be anchored to the floor, but I am trying to come up with a way to tie all 4 together (anchored to 2x12s on the slab as a base?) so that there will be no chance of movement. May sound like a little overkill, but I prefer to err on the side of safety

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