Street Noise Soundproofing - Building & Construction - Page 4 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-05-2012, 07:23 PM   #46
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 149
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Street noise soundproofing


@Ted - Do you do this for a living?
-Can you provide first hand expertise that R13 fiberglass "works [the] same or better" than (1)Foam, (2) Roxul, (3) loose fill.
-Can you verify that clips or channels are worth it? I've been told these actually don't make enough difference to justify cost, however they do create dead space.
-Can you verify that 5/8 drywall (the cheap kind) is more effective than QuietRock? Please check that stuff out if you have never seen or used.

Advertisement

rebelranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2012, 07:36 PM   #47
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Street noise soundproofing


I have done this for a living for 13 years and have been involved in the construction industry since 1983.

All of this data is readily available online. If you visited any acoustics forum you'd see these are all taken for granted points. None are my ideas.

The Canadian government has the finest acoustics lab in North America. They tested insulation of all types in all configurations. The cheapest fiberglass available actually has the adge in the low frequencies. Google the NRC . Report IRC-761. All the raw data a guy could ever want.

Clips don't create dead air space. They extend the air space while introducing an air-spring. Introducing these will yield an 8-10 STC point improvement with a huge increase in low frequency (bass) isolation performance. You might be thinking of adding the clips and channel to existing drywall, thereby creating a Triple Leaf. That's not good if you can avoid it.

Cheap drywall if used with a damping compound is what I said. If two walls both have damped mass then the one with the most mass wins. Hard to top double 5/8" drywall (1 1/4" thick)
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2012, 08:00 PM   #48
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 149
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Thanks TED! I have read so many acoustics forum it makes my head hurt. One says Fiberglass is the best, another says Roxul, and a third says dead space only. The same for clips and channels, some say do others say don't.

I know MASS is the best sound dampening device. So I get what you mean not with double 5/8 drywall.

If 8-10 STC improvement is available with clips I'm going to add those to my basement when I remove the drop ceiling.

Thanks! Oh and I never doubted your judgment I just wondered if you had actually installed the methods you preach...you most definitely have haha.
rebelranger is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to rebelranger For This Useful Post:
Ted White (12-05-2012)
Old 12-05-2012, 08:02 PM   #49
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Oh it's all good. And it's good to ask for validation. There's a lot of malarky out there.
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ted White For This Useful Post:
rebelranger (12-05-2012)
Old 12-05-2012, 08:43 PM   #50
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 244
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Quote:
Originally Posted by rebelranger View Post
Thanks TED! I have read so many acoustics forum it makes my head hurt.
Perhaps this will help with the pain:

http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing101/

http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...fing-articles/

Very informative articles and information ranging from action to take to circumstances to avoid (Thanks Ted). As someone who has relied on Ted's expertise in the past, I can tell you that the information you receive here and at the above links bears out. I went with a staggered stud wall, multiple layers of 5/8 drywall and GG. I went a bit overkill (3 layers 5/8 on each side of wall), but it was well worth the trouble.

Ted, since you'll likely monitor this thread, thanks! The toughest part of any project is arming yourself with correct information.
rightit is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rightit For This Useful Post:
oodssoo (12-06-2012), Ted White (12-16-2012)
Old 12-05-2012, 08:46 PM   #51
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 74
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Ted, thanks for a very informative reply.

I'm an OP here. I'm in an old 120 years old house and starting to think about interior soundproofing, now that exterior is mostly acceptable. I'm in a row house and it's really weirdly setup. It's almost like a big brick box divided in the middle onto 2 houses with some "sort of" party wall. Neighbor's house's been renovated and I assume no longer has any of the original plaster, which I understand does a lot better soundproofing job than drywall. Our kitchen was renovated by the previous owner too, who didn't do anything about soundproofing I assume. I suspect there are tons of voids in the party wall here and there too, as it's loosely bricked in (I've seen a small piece of party wall).

So, commenting on your soundproofing list... I honestly don't see how one can live in the house and have something like that worked on, a small 1200 sq/ft house like ours for instance. Unless it's something like basement. Otherwise, you gotta move out to have that done. Or if house is big enough than it's doable I guess. In our case, we'd for instance have to also re-renovate the kitchen: take out all cabinets & counter tops installed against the party wall first, ie be w/o the kitchen for a few weeks at minimum. Selling this type of project to wife is another matter all together.

Sorry, just venting a little I guess.
SM05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2012, 08:47 PM   #52
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 149
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Street noise soundproofing


@Rightit - Why the sound proofing? I'm really going to takes some more steps to soundproof my basement movie theater/pool room and the basement utility room. The utility room houses the furnace, washer, and dryer. The washer/dryer are pretty annoying because of the vibrations. Anyways what room did you do?
rebelranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2012, 09:13 PM   #53
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 244
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Quote:
Originally Posted by rebelranger View Post
@Rightit - Why the sound proofing?...what room did you do?
My office. I needed to keep sound in and sound out.
rightit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 09:36 AM   #54
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Your plaster is very massive, but mass isn't the complete answer. The plaster is completely coupled to your framing, whereas removing it allows the new mass (drywall) to be installed in a decoupled fashion.
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 01:43 PM   #55
NDW
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Thanks so much for the info, Ted et. al.

FYI, here's another very good website for STC data:

http://www.stcratings.com/assemblies.html

It provides STC ratings for various types of wall assemblies, and discusses the structural features that are most effective. A couple of interesting points:

As Ted says, use of damping compound is KEY when adding drywall layers. If you simply tack on an additional layer of drywall without using compound, it definitely helps, but perhaps not as much as it would seem. Tacking on a layer adds a somewhat modest 5 STC--it does not double the STC, which is what some might think before seeing the data. Use of the compound increases this dramatically. So if anyone is going to go to spend financial (and marital) resources on adding drywall, definitely add compound.

Second, and I thought this was interesting: if you build a second standalone wall as a soundproofing measure, adding layers of drywall between the two sets of studs (i.e., on the inside of the wall assembly), it actually reduces STC. Very counter intuitive. I believe that the reason for the STC reduction is that the sealed airspace within the wall creates a "drum" effect.
NDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 01:45 PM   #56
NDW
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Street noise soundproofing


PS: SM05, it sounds from your previous post that you're generally happy with your acoustic storm windows? True?
NDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 01:48 PM   #57
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Keep in mind STC does not measure bass, and paradoxically, that's where most problems occur.

to add 5-6 STC points to a coupled structure you would have to double the overall mass. That means double the drywall, as well as double the weight of the studs and insulation. 3 STC points is just audible.

The reason drywall in the middle hurts us is we now have two competing resonating air cavities and we only want one if we can help it. Otherwise we have a Triple Leaf and problems.
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2012, 12:58 PM   #58
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 74
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Sorry for a late reply. Caught up with work load finally...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post
Your plaster is very massive, but mass isn't the complete answer. The plaster is completely coupled to your framing, whereas removing it allows the new mass (drywall) to be installed in a decoupled fashion.
Ted I assume you were replying to my earlier post. Thanks! Just making sure..., you're saying plaster is still better than the regular drywall installed in a typical manner, right? Knocking on that wall, it actually sounds hollow. Wall seem to be some sort of thin wood panel. I'm thinking about removing that section and insulating it + quietrock. Shelving and TV wall mount are in the way though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDW
PS: SM05, it sounds from your previous post that you're generally happy with your acoustic storm windows? True?
I am, in general. It kind of makes your realize where the weak links are. Upstairs it made a sizable difference, making it the quietest room in the house. Downstairs on the other hand it had just re-confirmed what I already knew - front door needs some serious attention.

HTH.
SM05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2012, 01:02 PM   #59
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Street noise soundproofing


You can use standard drywall. Heavier and cheaper. Field apply a damping compound. Results are heavier and much cheaper
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Ted White For This Useful Post:
SM05 (12-16-2012)
Old 12-16-2012, 01:25 PM   #60
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 74
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Street noise soundproofing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White View Post
You can use standard drywall. Heavier and cheaper. Field apply a damping compound. Results are heavier and much cheaper
Anything I need to be careful about with that being a party wall and all, fire code, etc? Thanks.

Advertisement

SM05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
soundproofing


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rattling Noise from Roof when windy drgillian Roofing/Siding 3 02-18-2011 10:05 AM
Frigidaire freezer noise (sounds like a compressor) onelove Appliances 3 10-09-2010 10:16 AM
Popping noise in the flat roof mtrx Building & Construction 6 03-15-2010 11:18 PM
Flat roof rafters noise mtrx Roofing/Siding 5 03-09-2010 11:16 PM
Noisy furnace (with recording of noise) Jeffrey HVAC 3 01-23-2010 02:17 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts