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Old 07-30-2012, 07:26 AM   #16
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Steel I beam size


Wow thats a new one steel beam to hold up a deck. Never seen that done in my life. I'd go with doubled up 2x12 pt. you can in theory span 17' with a 2x12. I have a 11'x16' deck thats 11' in the air and I have enough room to park a car under it. If I was you I would put a carring beam at 10' and at the 20' mark. Just saying

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Old 07-30-2012, 07:42 AM   #17
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you can in theory span 17' with a 2x12.
No. You can't assume that without knowing the load the 2x12 is carrying.
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Old 07-30-2012, 07:54 AM   #18
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Thats why I said in theory...who in there right mind would span that?????? Like I said in my last post his best bet would be placing support beams on the 10' and 20' mark. I would use 2x10 or 2x12 joisting for the deck.


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No. You can't assume that without knowing the load the 2x12 is carrying.
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Old 07-30-2012, 08:24 AM   #19
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Thats why I said in theory...who in there right mind would span that?????? Like I said in my last post his best bet would be placing support beams on the 10' and 20' mark. I would use 2x10 or 2x12 joisting for the deck.
He can't put a support beam at the 10ft mark because that would need a post to support one end, and he didn't want a post .
This is why he wanted a beam which could span 20ft unsupported in the middle
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Old 07-30-2012, 08:50 AM   #20
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Steel I beam size


Tomorrow a crew of mine will be installing a beam that will clear span 23' on a deck, the deck is 10'x27' and the beam cantilevers the posts by 2' on each end. It can be done easily with steel, and right now steel framed decks in my market are in huge demand due to their large spans, longer life, more consistent material, etc.
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Old 07-30-2012, 09:00 AM   #21
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Tomorrow a crew of mine will be installing a beam that will clear span 23' on a deck, the deck is 10'x27' and the beam cantilevers the posts by 2' on each end. It can be done easily with steel, and right now steel framed decks in my market are in huge demand due to their large spans, longer life, more consistent material, etc.
How do you accommodate differences in thermal characteristics? i.e. how is the deck fastened to the steel structure.

For the OP, I think steel is a good option because of span, but I am curious what has been done in the field to alleviate movement in materials that are already highly effected by thermal characteristics. Wood and steel have very different coefficients.
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Old 07-30-2012, 09:42 AM   #22
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How do you accommodate differences in thermal characteristics? i.e. how is the deck fastened to the steel structure.

For the OP, I think steel is a good option because of span, but I am curious what has been done in the field to alleviate movement in materials that are already highly effected by thermal characteristics. Wood and steel have very different coefficients.
The composite decking is attached with clips that allow the decking to expand and contract as needed. The steel barely moves at all.
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Old 07-30-2012, 12:56 PM   #23
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Will a 6" steel I beam sopport a 20' span on a 20 x 14 deck attached to the home on one 20' side
Look into a treated glulam. I've used them to span over 20'. Forget the steel....
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:32 PM   #24
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Look into a treated glulam. I've used them to span over 20'. Forget the steel....
Forget the treated glu lam, go steel.

Why you hate on steel Joe?
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:40 PM   #25
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Forget the treated glu lam, go steel.

Why you hate on steel Joe?
I don't hate steel. Glulam is easier to work with . Steel has its place. Just not for this situation IMO anyway..
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Old 07-30-2012, 04:52 PM   #26
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Steel I beam size


Steel is very easy to work with if the builder is familiar with the material. For example, steel can be drilled quite easily with an ordinary drill if you have a sharp, hard drill bit, and you use oil. If you are used to drilling wood, it is possible you could use the wrong bit and the wrong lubricate, and incorrectly conclude that steel is hard to drill.

Similarly, it is easy to connect steel to wood if you use the correct connectors. Connectors designed for wood, such as the majority of Simpson connectors, do not work with steel, so again if the builder is unfamiliar with steel connectors, they may incorrectly conclude that it is difficult to connect wood and steel.

Steel can also be welded, which allows an experienced contractor to install brackets, flanges, and connectors quickly and easily. If the contractor primarily works with wood, they may be unfamiliar with welding techniques, and can incorrectly conclude that it is difficult to attach brackets to steel.

Steel can be painted using appropriate outdoor paints, and it is perfectly suitable for outdoor use. Many bridges are made using steel, they require appropriate paints and finishes, which are different than the paints and finishes used with wood. I happen to like working with steel, in my experience it is no more expensive than wood for long spans, it is often no heavier, and a steel beam of equivalent strength to a wooden beam, even a glulam or LVL, can generally be substantially less deep than the wood beam, which can be a big advantage in tight spaces.

One disadvantage of steel is that there are no prescriptive building codes for steel construction, so an engineer or architect is required to size the elements and develop the connection details. Other than that, I don't see any problem using steel on decks or houses, where its use is warranted by span or depth isses.
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Old 07-31-2012, 02:29 PM   #27
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The composite decking is attached with clips that allow the decking to expand and contract as needed. The steel barely moves at all.
Great. Just wanted to make sure it was accommodated.

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