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Old 09-09-2012, 04:47 PM   #1
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Stablize half-wall for shower


I'm building a half-wall for our shower. It will be tiled on both sides and my concern is that it is not rigid enough. There is still play from side to side.

The 2x4 frame is screwed to the wall studs and is re-inforced by three threaded 3/8" dia. rods from the top down through a 1 1/2" parallel floorboard. I've also screwed a 1/2" plywood side to the frame. There will also be 1/2" plywood attached to the open side.

My problem is that I feel the wall still has a bit too much play and I would be thankful for any suggestions on how to anchor it so that it is rigid and wouldn't risk tiling becoming unseated.

I appologize for the attached images, but there was little space to get a good angle.
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Old 09-09-2012, 04:52 PM   #2
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Stablize half-wall for shower


the ideal half wall sets into the wall it butts against with adequate blocking and at the least double plates at the floor bolted down and metal straps over the studs to attach to the bottom plates.

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Old 09-09-2012, 04:56 PM   #3
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Stablize half-wall for shower


Do you have access to the floor under this space? I would drop a 4x4 post through the floor at the outside edge and attach it either directly to a floor joist, or install 2x bridging between two joists and fasten to that. Similar to how you would support a newell post at the end of a stairwell.
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:44 PM   #4
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Stablize half-wall for shower


What is the black pan for? Is that a Tile Ready brand pan?
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:50 PM   #5
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Stablize half-wall for shower


Your all thread holds the wall to a floor board. it does not add any rigidity. You can just screw thru the bottom plate, but not just to a floor board. It needs to screw to a joist(s) running perpindicular, with double row as widely spaced as possible, If wall paralells joist, some bridging between joists. The free end stud should be longer covering end of plate not on it . Same thing at top, cover end not under it. Screw another 2X on top of plate and under top and end stud to them. Stubborn's idea definately bears looking into, don't think you need to go to a 4X4, replace end stud with longer 2X. If space allows 2x6's or wider instead of 4's would reduce rockiness. It looks like you've used an inside corner brace on center stud, longer wider heavy gauge inside corner braces on plate and up end stud, with as long a vertical leg as you can find would help.Can you go wider? Keep 2X4 top plate, run widest 2X you can on edge along side top into existing wall cavity and fasten to stud inner face, room to do both sides, with some blocking in existing wall? A decorative but structural metal pole running from top of wall to ceiling joists or bridging?
Column doing same?
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Old 09-09-2012, 08:04 PM   #6
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Stablize half-wall for shower


Another option when you can't open up the floor or there is plumbing or hvac in the way that can work is a 3" wide L bracket with say 12" legs, use 1/4" thick metal for this. Get a metal shop to make it as you can't buy one.
They cut 2 12" pieces and weld them together in a 90degree fashion making an L. Before welding they drill holes in it for screws. This goes on top of your bottom plate and up the inside of your last stud.
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Old 09-09-2012, 08:19 PM   #7
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Stablize half-wall for shower


Can't tell based on your picture but:

1. have you driven in screws (every 8-10 inches) for each half-wall studs, top/bottom plates? use deckmate screws, not drywall screws.

2. do you have a space to upgrade from 1/2 to 3/4 inch ply (exterior grade)?

3. for each of your studs, did you use screws or nails to secure to the floor? If screws, I would take them out and toe nail in 16d nails

4. What do you plan on doing with those threaded nuts sticking out on top? Tile over it? I am not an engineer but I think those threaded rods are simply squeezing the top and bottom plates with little return in torsional rigidity.

What do you plan on doing between your window and the half-wall. Maybe consider installing a narrow box seat? I think that might give you added strength to make the wall less prone to twisting at the end.

Last edited by allthumbsdiy; 09-09-2012 at 08:20 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 09-09-2012, 08:33 PM   #8
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Stablize half-wall for shower


Quote:
Originally Posted by stubborn1 View Post
Do you have access to the floor under this space? I would drop a 4x4 post through the floor at the outside edge and attach it either directly to a floor joist, or install 2x bridging between two joists and fasten to that. Similar to how you would support a newell post at the end of a stairwell.
Definitely the best and really the only way to do it to ensure it remains stable in the long term. Even if you don't have access from the bottom you can remove a section of the subfloor to get access from the top.
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Old 09-09-2012, 08:45 PM   #9
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Stablize half-wall for shower


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Definitely the best and really the only way to do it to ensure it remains stable in the long term. Even if you don't have access from the bottom you can remove a section of the subfloor to get access from the top.
*Stubborn1 has a great idea... we do this from the framing stage... secure a post right inside the end of your wall (as your last stud) and send it into the floor to be secured as far below the subfloor as possible for the most strength. A 4x4 post was suggested, but a 2x4 post is definitely sufficient.
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Old 09-09-2012, 09:00 PM   #10
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Stablize half-wall for shower


The 2x4 or 4x4 post down into the floor and solidly blocked to the joists is ideal.
Sometimes however this is not possible, it can be a concrete floor, or there can be stuff exactly in the area you want to put your post.
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Old 09-10-2012, 04:41 PM   #11
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Stablize half-wall for shower


If it is a solid concrete floor, I would recommend drilling a 3/4" hole through the top plate, bottom plate and into the floor right beside the last stud, then drive a 3/4" solid steel pipe through the wall, and into the floor to end up flush with the top of the wall, and as far into the floor as possible... and secure it to the last stud for extra strength.
** BE CAREFUL ** There may be in floor heating, or if this is a "Core Slab" floor (which is made up of self supporting concrete slabs -- like a bridge) then you may not want to drill into this.
In conventional framing, and there is a joist in the way, there are 2 options...
1. Joists running parallel -- Turn 2x4 post sideways, and run it along side the joist (even notching the post will add strength to the wall)
2. Joist running perpendicular to wall -- move 2x4 post back to other side of joist that is in the way.
--- There may be other things in the way, such as pipes or a beam... I would not recommend cutting any part of a joist, beam or other support.
Good luck!

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