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-   -   split level, unfinished basement with radiant heat - floor/insulate questions (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/split-level-unfinished-basement-radiant-heat-floor-insulate-questions-92473/)

krisbfunk 01-16-2011 12:13 PM

split level, unfinished basement with radiant heat - floor/insulate questions
 
I'm in Canada, living in a split level and the lowest level of the basement is unfinished, the floor is radiant heated cement. I would like to use XPS/gypsum on the walls, but what is the method of flooring when there is radiant heat under the cement?

One wall is half wall of cement, then the other half (interior facing) is standard wood frame wall. How do I go about dealing with this portion with insulation and wood frame?

Ron6519 01-16-2011 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by krisbfunk (Post 571423)
I'm in Canada, living in a split level and the lowest level of the basement is unfinished, the floor is radiant heated cement. I would like to use XPS/gypsum on the walls, but what is the method of flooring when there is radiant heat under the cement?

One wall is half wall of cement, then the other half (interior facing) is standard wood frame wall. How do I go about dealing with this portion with insulation and wood frame?

If you can't get the layout plan for the floor, you're now going into the concrete with anything. You can use adhesive to hold the wood in place or a combination of "L" brackets(bolted to the wall and lagged to the bottom plate) and adhesive.
There are numerous other solurtions that include furring the wall.
Ron

krisbfunk 01-16-2011 02:29 PM

After reading a bit on laminate installation instructions (how I intend to floor it), I see it is unnecessary to insulate the radiant heated cement floor.. just lay PE film, then foam or a 2-in-1 underlayment ( clear polyethylene moisture barrier bonded to a blue polyethylene foam) prior to laying the laminate. Everything I was reading about insulating unfinished basements prior was instructing to lay down XPS on basement floor, then plywood.. but of course it's a diff scenario with the heated floor.

So my only question is how to deal with the half wall. about 4 feet up is cement, then sitting on that is a standard wood frame with batting insulation. IF i add 2" XPS, then a wood frame over that, then it's going to come out quite a bit... which I suppose is just a matter of preference on what to do with that outjutting gap? What do I do with that in the middle where the XPS ends and the upper wood frame starts.. spray foam it?

https://img.skitch.com/20110116-dace...xugqjs9gif.jpg

krisbfunk 01-16-2011 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 571517)
If you can't get the layout plan for the floor, you're now going into the concrete with anything. You can use adhesive to hold the wood in place or a combination of "L" brackets(bolted to the wall and lagged to the bottom plate) and adhesive.
There are numerous other solurtions that include furring the wall.
Ron

Ron, so you're saying I don't need to insulate this portion of the wall? It is technically underground, only the top part is interior facing. Just looking at it now, as shown in the photo.. the gyprock just hangs over the cement without any sort of insulation or adhesive whatsoever, is this ok? this method works because the wood is hanging over the cement (apart from the fact that it's not insulated).. except on this side of the wall, the wood frame is inset, rather than outset.

Ron6519 01-16-2011 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by krisbfunk (Post 571539)
Ron, so you're saying I don't need to insulate this portion of the wall? It is technically underground, only the top part is interior facing. Just looking at it now, as shown in the photo.. the gyprock just hangs over the cement without any sort of insulation or adhesive whatsoever, is this ok? this method works because the wood is hanging over the cement (apart from the fact that it's not insulated).. except on this side of the wall, the wood frame is inset, rather than outset.

What I addressed was the wood plate connection to the floor. I said nothing about insulation.
If you live in a cold climate, you would frame the wall and insulate. Or use foam boards. Or...etc.
How you frame the wall is up to you. The 1/2 wall bump out. The straight wall in front, etc. The decision is based on space, ascetics, and obstacles you find in the room.
Ron

krisbfunk 01-16-2011 05:17 PM

Sorry Ron, I misread your post. I live in Canada (PE) so we get cold winters, i will have to insulate, just wasn't sure if it was necessary on this interior facing wall, seeing as the builders didn't insulate behind the gyprock by the stairs as seen in the photo.

Ron6519 01-16-2011 05:39 PM

The wall is so small,why not insulate it. I see 2 issues that need to be addressed. The dryer vent and the waste pipe. How were you going to deal with those?
You could box them in one structure and just furr the wall straight up to the ceiling and put in foamboards over the concrete.
Ron

krisbfunk 01-16-2011 06:22 PM

What about pipe accessibility? Will I need to do anything to make them accessible?

The wall extends another 6 feet to the right, and there's another one just like it on the other side of the door, down an additional 14.5 feet.

I was thinking I could just make a stud wall floor to ceiling here, the stud wall would go around these outjutting pipes, and remove any need to create any sort of additional box around the pipes. Since I would be doing this for the other 3 walls, it seems to make sense. But I suppose furring is cheaper... hmm.

Ron6519 01-16-2011 07:06 PM

You would need to have accessibility to the section I see. You have a cleanout for the waste pipe and you need to clean out the dryer pipe every 6 months, or more, depending on the wash load in the house.
Ron

krisbfunk 01-16-2011 08:03 PM

So then, when i am applying the foam to the cement in this area. Do I cut it to fit around the pipe then spray foam in around the hole where the pipe comes out to seal it off?

Then I'm guessing when I build the frame around these pipes, I have to build some sort of a door to access these, or perhaps just make it into a closet. I don't know, what do you think is the best option for accessibility?

Ron6519 01-16-2011 11:09 PM

I would just install a regular door in front of this area. The area you need to access is basically floor to ceiling. If you need to use a snake in the cleanout. you or the plumber will need room to work. I'd pick a prehung door 12 wider the the pipe spread.
Since the foam would need to be covered with sheetrock because it's flammable, I 'd leave it off the wall in the closet area.
Ron


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