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Old 06-05-2009, 10:44 AM   #1
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soundproofing common wall


I share 1 common wall with my neighbour. It is 2 bricks walls, one on her side and the other on my side. The only thing on top of that is the plaster that gives it the finishing smooth surface.

I need to sound proof that wall without framing on it. I was thinking of just putting some pink rigid insulation on it and then drywall over.. Will that work?

I was wondering if there is some kinda of sound proofing boards i can put on there and then put drywall..

opinions and suggestions are appreciated.

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Old 06-05-2009, 11:02 AM   #2
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soundproofing common wall


When you say no framing is that because it has to be removeable back to current condition? The foam probably conducts some sound quite well so it might not help and you'd need furring strips screwed into the bricks to support the drywall.

You have plenty of mass in the wall to absorb sound so I'd guess that what you need is to stop the remaining sound that is being conducted. Resilient channel covered with drywall is often used for this. It has to be installed correctly or it doesn't work.

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Old 06-05-2009, 11:07 AM   #3
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soundproofing common wall


Quote:
Originally Posted by jogr View Post
When you say no framing is that because it has to be removeable back to current condition? The foam probably conducts some sound quite well so it might not help and you'd need furring strips screwed into the bricks to support the drywall.
It's an old house, of just brick and plaster, so the common wall is just brick, a thin cement veneer and then plaster. The sound from my neighbor travels pretty good through it.


You have plenty of mass in the wall to absorb sound so I'd guess that what you need is to stop the remaining sound that is being conducted. Resilient channel covered with drywall is often used for this. It has to be installed correctly or it doesn't work.[/quote]

I will look into that resilient channel stuff.. I was more leaning towards placing a soundboard and then drywall, but not really sure where to buy sound boards in Toronto.
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:28 AM   #4
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soundproofing common wall


Check out Green Glue http://www.greengluecompany.com.

5/8" fire rated drywall is what we use with the green glue.

I've used this many times and just used it in my personal house between the master area and the family room.

In your case, you'd need to hang a layer of drywall on the brick in some way. You'd then squirt 2-3 tubes of greenglue on the back of the 5/8" drywall and hang it over the existing drywall making sure your seams for the second layer don't match up with the seams from the first yater.
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Old 06-05-2009, 11:54 AM   #5
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soundproofing common wall


I have the same construction in my house. I did one wall with furring and drywall and filled the voids with Styrofoam panels. Cut the noise down around 50% (or more). Wasn't really satisfied, so the same wall next room, I hung a layer of floating wood floor padding, then put my furring strips up (over the padding, which had a side benefit of reducing shim use). I used a higher insulation rated foam to fill the voids. Markedly better results. I also left a quarter inch gap, top and bottom of the drywall and filled with mastic (probably overkill).
Next time just as an experiment, I'm going to staple foam on top of the furring. The stuff they use for cement slab edges is cheap.
Sound basics, air is a poor conductor, for heat and sound. Most anything that works for heat insulation, works for sound insulation. To enhance sound deadening, changing the direction of the sound also reduces it, so they make special sound deadening panels, with knobs or angles. Something rigidly attached transmits sound, something as free floating as possible absorbs sound. Or in other words, loose insulation is better than rigid or tight insulation
One by product of the whole exercise, was the room requires about half the heating in the winter time. The old stone wall doesn't leech the heat like it used to.
Green glue sounds promising, I'd have to try it to be convinced.

As a side note, the walls in my kitchen are furred and hung with early drywall type panels, the voids filled with sawdust. Probably built 60 years ago, by an old timer. It actually works well. A granular insulation may be an answer, but likely hard to work with.

Last edited by Bigfoot; 06-05-2009 at 12:13 PM.
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