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Old 08-12-2008, 07:33 PM   #1
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Sound proof interior dividing wall? Best way.


Situation:
A commercial business that wants to block the sound transmission through one wall, of a 4-wall room. (between reception and an exercise room).
The wall is already built, and approx 20' long.
Drywall - Metal studs - Drywall (no insulation)

Question:
Looking for the most effective and economical way of reducing sound travel through the wall.

My Ideas...
I thought of drilling holes through the drywall, and spraying in expanding foam... However after looking at "Great Stuff"s website, they say the foam will not cure in this volume and enclosed space.

Looking for any ideas on this, as I would not like to tear down the drywall just to install 20 feet of pink.



Thanks Guys. No idea is a bad idea!

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Old 08-12-2008, 07:45 PM   #2
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Sound proof interior dividing wall? Best way.


The reason sound transmits through a standard stud wall is because the sheetrock is directly and solidly attached to each side of each stud. Therefore, sound waves easily travel through the solid parts of the wall.

To reduce sound transmission you need to break that surface contact. Foam will not do that.

Without tearing down the existing wall and framing it differently, the best way to deal with this in my opinion is to add another layer of sheetrock to each side of the wall. Use hat channel (metal strips that the rock attaches to) horizontally on the wall, attached through the existing rock to the studs. The new layers of rock (preferrably 5/8") will attach with screws just long enough to fasten them to the hat channel. With the new rock applied to the channel, the surface to surface contact is greatly minimized. Plus, it creates another airspace.

Simply adding another layer of rock to each side of the wall without the hat channel will only reduce noise transmission by about 5db...That is not much at all.

If you wanted to insulate the wall, there are sound attenuation batts available, but you'd have to tear down one side of the existing rock.

Here's an online article that might help you out some more...
http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/channel.htm

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Old 08-12-2008, 11:09 PM   #3
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Sound proof interior dividing wall? Best way.


Thanks KC,
Ive been researching that site since you posted... Looks like there is not a 'quick fix' like I was hoping.

The curious thing, is that the other dividing wall in that room WAS insulated when built (requested by customer), and there is not a complaint regarding the sound through that wall.

Any thoughts or experience on the Green Glue I found through your link? I wonder if the rubbery-glue divide would be an efficient break from the studding?:

VISCO-ELASTIC GREEN GLUE
COMPOUND REVOLUTIONIZES SOUNDPROOFING!

http://www.soundproofing.org/ggpages...FRJexwoddBnAbg
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Old 08-13-2008, 08:05 AM   #4
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Sound proof interior dividing wall? Best way.


I've never seen that stuff used in a party wall. The price would be a major turnoff for me personally. Hat channel/resilient channel work well and have for years.......And they're inexpensive. Either way you'd have to add a layer of rock.

Insulating a wall with batts or rock wool blankets certainly will help reduce the transmission of sound, as you mentioned with the other wall that hasn't had any issues.

One thing to remember is that you may be trying to modify an occupancy separation wall...A wall that is fire rated for separation or protection of structural members. Underwriters Labs and/or the Gypsum Association perform these tests, and their designs are specified in many commercial buildings. Rated walls are tested and listed under strict standards, and must match those standards down to the smallest detail like the length of the screws and the brand of the sheetrock. Addition of more rock to a rated wall will violate the fire rating, and could cause you problems of all sorts. Adding insulation will also violate some listings. The fire inspector might catch it as well if you get annual inspections.
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Old 08-15-2008, 10:58 AM   #5
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Sound proof interior dividing wall? Best way.


The cheapest way to get a good result is to just add another layer of drywall. Best would be to build a second wall an inch or two away from the current wall. Drywall on both sides, insulation if you want.
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