Sound Proof Ceiling - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-17-2010, 06:32 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Holy thread resurrection, Batman!

I just closed on a condo where I'm looking to do something very similar: reduce the noise coming from the unit above me.

It's a combination of impact and airborne, with the majority of it being airborne (music, loud talking, etc.). When footsteps are heard, they're actually fairly high in frequency, i.e. creating roughly the same resonances as music or voice, as opposed to a low-frequency thumping.

Surprise, surprise, the condos all have laminate floors in the living/dining areas and kitchen...and another shocker, it ain't exactly the good stuff, and I doubt the underlayment is the best, most dense available...

I've got a couple questions based on Ted's responses in a similar, much more recent thread over in the pro forums:

1) I'm thinking double 5/8" drywall with damping compound in between, but I gather that RC wouldn't be worth the expense and effort because it would be attached to existing drywall and not joists, correct?

2) Weight: Double 5/8" comes out to roughly 4.5 lbs/sq. ft (assuming ~70 lbs. per individual 4'x8' sheet). I'm *assuming* the joists are 2x6 - would an additional 4.5 lbs/sq ft be a problem (assuming 1/2" existing drywall)? I would definitely make sure I was screwing directly into the joists.

Thanks much,
Rich

Advertisement

condeau07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 09:09 AM   #2
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Hi Rich,

Resilient channel is a very problematic product in the best of circumstances. However you are correct, you would not use any product like channel, furring strips, etc on an existing wall or ceiling surface. The resulting air gap will be problematic. Either tear the ceiling doen or add to it as-is.

I would be shocked if you had 2x6 joists. I would bet 2x10 or better. 4-5 lbs psf. isn't a lot of weight. Always check on these things, however.

Advertisement

Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 11:15 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Thanks much for the response, Ted.

Ooooh, yeah, I would most definitely be confirming what the joists are/can handle. I just wanted to get an idea of whether I was way off base or at least in the ballpark.

However, as I've been thinking about this, it's become quite apparent that if I'm going to do this at all, it will need to be done professionally. I've never hung drywall in my life, and this is neither the time nor place to learn. A garage or a storage room in an unfinished basement with plenty of room and "margin for error" - sure. My primary residence for the next several years - um, no.

Thanks again,
Rich
condeau07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2010, 11:19 AM   #4
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Sound proof ceiling


A drywall contractor can do this. Essentially it's drywall work. Nothing difficult
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 10:12 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sound proof ceiling


So before I got too gung-ho on this idea, I decided I'd better do a sanity check on the dimensions of the building elevator as it obviously isn't a freight elevator (for instance, I can easily touch the ceiling, which means it's less than 8').

Sure enough, total dims are 7'5" high, 6' long, and barely 4' deep. You might be able to get a double stack of 4x8 drywall in there by bringing it in on its side and then standing it up diagonally across the 6' length, as well as angling it across the ~4' width, but considering that the ~600 sq ft of ceiling that I want to treat would need at least 20 x 2 sheets...ouch.

Leaving cost aside for now , what would be the impact on the dampening performance of the drywall if the sheets were cut into 4'x4' sections? Obviously you could still hit 16" centers correctly, but would the shorter length change the dampening characteristics of the drywall?

This is getting...interesting...
condeau07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 11:07 AM   #6
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Cutting drywall for elevators is not uncommon. It won't hurt anything
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 12:04 PM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Thanks much, Ted, very good to know.

Onwards and upwards, then...
condeau07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 12:06 PM   #8
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Yes, Onwards and upwards!
Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 01:50 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Some people remove a window & bring it in that way
They have booms & will deliver to the window
Depending upon the height..IE how many floors up you are
Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 03:01 PM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Sound proof ceiling


I just spoke with a guy at a local drywall install company and that's exactly what he said.

However, he also made a very good suggestion that I'm going to do some research on this evening: check to see if there is any insulation in the joist cavities. The building is 21 years old (and was originally apartments), and he said there's a good chance that there's nothing up there.

If that's the case, then getting insulation blown/foamed in would be step one, and may very well end up being the only step needed.
condeau07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2010, 03:07 PM   #11
Soundproofing Guy
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Sound proof ceiling


Quote:
Originally Posted by condeau07 View Post
If that's the case, then getting insulation blown/foamed in would be step one, and may very well end up being the only step needed.
#1 Insulation actually contributes surprisingly little to sound isolation. Especially in coupled framing (which is what you have currently). See the data here: http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/obj/irc/do...r693/ir693.pdf

You shouldn't skip using it, but don't count on it doing much.

#2 Blowing in cellulose theoretically works, as long as there's no compression. There's a tendency to blow in extra if it is for acoustical purposes. Also, an obstacle like pipes or wires can block the insulation as it's being blown in. Both of these things cause compression = conduction. So go easy.

#3 Foam insulation is excellent for thermal, poor for acoustic. It is far too dense and conductive. Light fluffy insulation is what you want.

Advertisement

Ted White is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
An extensive 'drop ceiling' project- where to begin... kpatten Remodeling 7 02-05-2010 07:31 PM
Ceiling Repairs and Muresco Paint: Seamless Paint Job Possible? Lovegasoline Painting 4 11-25-2009 03:06 PM
Insulating unfinshed basement ceiling for sound daveyd Building & Construction 38 02-02-2009 11:57 AM
Sound proof interior dividing wall? Best way. 1forest1 Building & Construction 4 08-15-2008 11:58 AM
Sound proof walls!!! Fux39 Building & Construction 3 11-29-2006 09:28 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts