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Old 11-22-2012, 02:21 AM   #16
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


If in doubt, make it stout.

(2) 2x8's should be fine.

Under the main floor post is a large steel beam. The column for that beam is within a few feet of the point load.

Seeing that the house had been unsupported like this for a few years shows there is a good safety factor. Built in 1975. I would not be confident a mass produced home today could do this.

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Old 11-22-2012, 11:27 AM   #17
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Sorry, double 2x8 will only span 5'9" with a 10' joist breaking on it.

14' joist = 5' span. 18' joist = 4'5" header. These are minimum from that link I gave.

8' span = double 2x12's with only 10' joist bearing. Keep up on your H.O.Insurance...

Gary
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Old 11-22-2012, 10:51 PM   #18
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Eff,

If you're right then my header is undersized. The joists hanging off it are 10' and the span is 7'8". I may just build the opening smaller to reduce the span.

Yes, insurance is topped up.

thx
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Old 11-23-2012, 10:25 PM   #19
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.-img_7872.jpg

Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.-img_7864.jpg

Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.-img_7853.jpg

Header is in place.

I jacked it in place and hammered 2x8 blocks that I tapered underneath the point loads to transfer the weight on to the steal beam in the basement.

The joists were sagging almost an inch in some locations. It was scary hearing all the creaking when I was jacking it up.

Though it all looks fine now. Thanks for all the advice.

Still no fat chicks upstairs though.
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Old 11-23-2012, 10:31 PM   #20
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Some more images.
Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.-img_7868.jpg

Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.-img_7871.jpg
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Old 11-23-2012, 10:38 PM   #21
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Just tell me right did I see 3/4 inch plywood subfloor ??


Merci,
Marc
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Old 11-24-2012, 09:03 AM   #22
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchelectrican
Just tell me right did I see 3/4 inch plywood subfloor ??

Merci,
Marc
It's 5/8"
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Old 11-24-2012, 11:03 PM   #23
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


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It's 5/8"
Wiskey Tango Fox ?????

That is a first time I ever heard that for subfloor thickness I never ran into any thing less than 3/4 inch thick and I belive the IBC do call minuim of 3/4 inch or thicker.

Even I used to work on new home construction and I always see that and used the T&G which it is most common one but for older home it is not too uncommon to see a inch thick "plank"board most case useally 1 1/4 inch thick is pretty common.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 11-24-2012, 11:20 PM   #24
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


There have been lots of "Why The Faces" with this house.
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Old 11-24-2012, 11:45 PM   #25
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Quote:
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There have been lots of "Why The Faces" with this house.
I can see why you have alot of patince with that But I am glad you are doing the right thing to fix up whoever left the funny Why The Faces mess behind.

I will advise ya check the electrical system very carefull as well once you do see hidden box that will raise automatique red flag there so go over carefull if you have your freinds have some type of borescope you can just drill a very small hole and take a look inside the wall or ceiling cavity to see how it set up.

( sometime you can rent them as well )

Merci,
Marc
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Old 11-24-2012, 11:55 PM   #26
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Quote from the first Code book I bought new; "Dwelling construction under the Uniform Building Code, 1976 Edition" Table No.25-R-1-Allowable spans for plywood subfloor continuous over two or more spans and face grain perpendicular to supports;

Panel ID index= 32/16

plywood thickness= 1/2", 5/8"

Max. span; edges blocked= 32"
edges unblocked= 28"

total load = 55#per sq.ft. live load= 50#

floor max. span= 16"*
*= may be 24" if 25/32" wood strip flooring is installed at right angles to joists.

Many apartment floors were laid with 5/8" plywood (no blocking or T&G) and topped with 1-1/2" of "light-weight" concrete over 15# builders paper. Last summer I demoed a basement bedroom apt. floor with extreme difficulty (circa 1970's). The joists were over-spanned to today's codes and compressed 3/8" at bearing walls due to 3 stories high. Some mid-span joist sag but not nearly as you might expect. Back when trees were trees (weight-maxed trucks with 3 logs on them) and framers were carpenters...

Check out today's 24/16 and 32/16 floor spans; third chart down: http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/ic..._23_par100.htm

Gary
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Old 11-25-2012, 01:23 AM   #27
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Lol. Yes, I am being very dilegent to find all the Wtf's. Escpecially the wiring. Others include... (So sorry for the rant. But this is actually the first time counting all the "wtf's".)

- A basement wall that was framed with the studs horizontal.
- A 15A electrical outlet (14/2) for the microwave was junctioned off a hot wire from a 240V-40A stove outlet. .
- That same 240V box was mounted outside the wall behind the range with nomex wires and run through the cabinets where metal pots and pans were. (fraying in multiple locations too)
- In the electrical panel, there were 4 grounds that were not connected. They were just leaning on the metal box. One of which was the electrical water heater! Another breaker wasn't tight and the hot wire just fell out when I touched it.
- Underneath every window was mold. Needed to cut out the drywall to find that the vapour barriers were ripped/pierced or completely missing.
- Aluminum wires connected to copper devices. Most used merettes not meant for aluminum.
- Hot and cold water swapped in the shower, (had to open the wall to fix). Also swapped in the bath sink, and kitchen sink.
- No P-trap in basement sink or laundry.
- Random holes in subfloors (maybe for ducting) covered with carpet.
- Most switches upside down.
- Mystery switches.
- Evidence of a big water leak. Mold.
- Basement no vapour barrier. Mold.
- Kitchen outlet had no ground wire, instead they ran a wire to the copper plumbing pipe. No gfi.
- Enormous amounts of mouse pooh in basement and kitchen bulkheads.
- Finally, missing 2 structural walls that were covered with thick baseboards.

Yes, I had a home inspector and a certified electrician check the home before our purchase.
Unfortunately, most of these things are not apparent with a visual check.

Again, sorry for the rant. All the above has been fixed by myself. So if anyone needs advice.

We're way over budget. Crossing all my fingers that I don't have more to add to the list though I'm sure there'll be more. If I were not so honest, there'd conveniently be a fire when we're not home.
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Old 11-25-2012, 09:45 AM   #28
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


the headers look great! might want to add horizontal continous blocking around the vertical support you added under the point load on top of the steel beam to keep the support from kicking out over time. just add the blocking back to the joists on either side of the support...
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Old 11-25-2012, 06:55 PM   #29
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Something doesn't seem right here. Structural wall removed with no support.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Siubeer View Post
Lol. Yes, I am being very dilegent to find all the Wtf's. Escpecially the wiring. Others include... (So sorry for the rant. But this is actually the first time counting all the "wtf's".)

- A basement wall that was framed with the studs horizontal.
Hortzonal ? that is very odd for basement set up.

- A 15A electrical outlet (14/2) for the microwave was junctioned off a hot wire from a 240V-40A stove outlet. . Did someone change the breaker to 15 amp or left it on 40 amp ? if they left it on 40 amp that is a major no-no on this one. The microwave circuit should be it own circuit if you can able fish it that fine I know you mention over the budget but try to sqezze couple more dollars and run this one so you can leave the electrique stove circuit alone in case you want to reverted back to electrique stove.
- That same 240V box was mounted outside the wall behind the range with nomex wires and run through the cabinets where metal pots and pans were. (fraying in multiple locations too)I think it is the time to get rid that "timebomb" and run a new one.
- In the electrical panel, there were 4 grounds that were not connected. They were just leaning on the metal box. One of which was the electrical water heater! Another breaker wasn't tight and the hot wire just fell out when I touched it. ouch I am glad you found them now instead find out later why some circuits not work.
- Underneath every window was mold. Needed to cut out the drywall to find that the vapour barriers were ripped/pierced or completely missing.
Sound like former owner try to save alot bucks but it don't do wonders at all espcally with molds you have to stop the mold spreading around for your family sake.
- Aluminum wires connected to copper devices. Most used merettes not meant for aluminum. Few merettes are rated to work with copper/ aluminum conductors but becarefull with switch or receptale some are not marked to use with alum conductors.
- Hot and cold water swapped in the shower, (had to open the wall to fix). Also swapped in the bath sink, and kitchen sink.
- No P-trap in basement sink or laundry.
- Random holes in subfloors (maybe for ducting) covered with carpet.
- Most switches upside down.
- Mystery switches. Possiblty switched receptales or outside receptale or luminaires
- Evidence of a big water leak. Mold.
- Basement no vapour barrier. Mold.
- Kitchen outlet had no ground wire, instead they ran a wire to the copper plumbing pipe. No gfi.That is major no-no I know some case it used to be allowed in older code edition but not any more there is a main reason why they don't do that any more due many plumming pipes are being replaced with plastique and you loose the bonding so that is the main safety reason there.
- Enormous amounts of mouse pooh in basement and kitchen bulkheads.
- Finally, missing 2 structural walls that were covered with thick baseboards.

Yes, I had a home inspector and a certified electrician check the home before our purchase.
Unfortunately, most of these things are not apparent with a visual check.

Again, sorry for the rant. All the above has been fixed by myself. So if anyone needs advice.

We're way over budget. Crossing all my fingers that I don't have more to add to the list though I'm sure there'll be more. If I were not so honest, there'd conveniently be a fire when we're not home.

I know sometime with inspectors they don't catch every thing but once you open up the wall you can actually see what is going on with the mess.

I am glad you are doing the right thing is fixed up right and please and I mean please take a photo and doucment in your records so you know what it been done right.

Merci,
Marc

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