Sizing LVL's. Am I In The Right Ballpark? - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-05-2014, 02:41 PM   #1
Member
 
iminaquagmire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 370
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


I am soon to be removing a bearing wall in my parents' house between the living room and kitchen. This is the second floor so only the ceiling joists are supported by the bearing wall. The span of the ceiling joists is equal on either side with both resting on the bearing wall. There already is an open ceiling supported by a double 2x12. Plan is to remove that and the bearing wall and support the whole 22' span with a double 1 3/4 x 16 LVL (speced by a family member who is a construction engineer). This will be lagged together with Trussloks according to GP specs and the joist rehung with appropriate hangers. There are support posts already in place in the walls going down to the foundation at both new bearing points.

I'm just trying to go into this with the right idea and correct terminology. My soon to be brother in law who who speced the beam is just out of school and doesn't have a lot of real world experience. Just so its here, my city requires 25psf for snow loading, 90mph wind loading, and category B for for seismic loading. Roof area above is 550sq ft (225 on either side. However this beam will not support the ridge and like I said, only supports the break in the ceiling joists.

Does the double 1 3/4x16 LVL sound appropriate? I know the standard response is to consult an engineer but I have and I just want to double check him. I hate to hire another. Appreciate any help. Thanks.

Advertisement

iminaquagmire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2014, 06:35 PM   #2
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,306
Rewards Points: 2,190
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


Since your soon to be brother in law is just out of school, he cannot be a registered engineer, since he lacks the required five years of experience to even sit for the exam. He may well be capable of specifying the beam based on his school and practical knowledge, but it seems a stretch that you pulled a permit based on drawings and specs prepared by an unregistered individual, especially in the Chicago area. It is also a tremendous responsibility he has taken on by offering professional advice without a license. Consider the unpleasant consequences if for some reason the beam is undersized, or incorrectly detailed, or the building inspector happens to notice that you performed structural work without a permit.

No one on this forum can legally size your beam for you without a hands on inspection. Anyone who offers an opinion as to the adequacy of sizing is taking on enormous responsibility. No one with a license to lose is going to do it, so that leaves unlicensed folks to offer opinions on an internet chat forum. You really want to trust your house to that?

Advertisement

Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Daniel Holzman For This Useful Post:
AndyGump (05-06-2014), Nailbags (05-06-2014), woodworkbykirk (05-05-2014)
Old 05-05-2014, 08:30 PM   #3
journeyman carpenter
 
woodworkbykirk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: nova scotia canada
Posts: 2,772
Rewards Points: 160
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


i cant agree more with what daniel just stated, also just based on my own experience a double lvl spanning 22' is nowhere near enough, the most ive spanned a double 16" lvl is 13' anything more we would have had to go to a 3 ply or steel beam
woodworkbykirk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2014, 10:42 PM   #4
Member
 
garlicbreath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 237
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


I did 22' with ceiling joists and roof and my stamped drawing had 3 16" lvl's. The p.e. also had an optional beam with lvl's and steel. So, yeah, get an engineer to look at it. You get a b.o.m., drawing, how to put it together and it will keep the local inspector happy.

Sent from my Motorola MicroTAC 9800X

Last edited by garlicbreath; 05-05-2014 at 10:45 PM.
garlicbreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2014, 01:44 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 713
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


Post a copy of the calcs he has done (with names and address etc obscured).
tony.g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2014, 01:00 AM   #6
Member
 
iminaquagmire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 370
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


Thank you for the responses. This was what I was looking for. My BIL's spec was an off the cuff "oh that should be plenty". He was still going to do the proper calculations and I rushed the post stating that as fact. I did not know that engineers had that much internship before they could sit for an exam. Even more respect for them. After talking with the engineer at the lumber yard, I will be going with a triple 18" LVL.

Parents don't want to go through permitting process as there is too much going on with other jobs around the house. Not saying its right, just saying there won't be an inspection. They would just go off the drawings anyway. I assure you I would not do anything to jeopardize the structure of my parents' house.

Thanks again and I'll update as the process goes forward.
iminaquagmire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2014, 10:27 PM   #7
Member
 
Msradell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Louisville Kentucky
Posts: 1,315
Rewards Points: 776
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


Inspection criteria in the Chicago area is very strict and you don't want to get caught doing work without a permit. In most cases you don't even want to get caught doing the work yourself. Meeting all the applicable codes in that area is very difficult in the inspections are a real pain but the consequences in the future if the authorities find out that work was done without a permit or even more severe!
Msradell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2014, 11:28 PM   #8
Member
 
iminaquagmire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 370
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Sizing LVL's. Am I in the right ballpark?


I appreciate the concern and appreciate the comments earlier. I know I posted here looking for advice that I then got and as I said above I am thankful for. I am not trying to be dismissive or harsh but I just want to clarify I'm not in Chicago or really even the Chicago area, I'm in the far north suburbs where inspections have no palm greasing. I'm confident in my abilities and the sizing of the beam. There are no penalties for doing this work without a permit if caught. They just want their fee to review an engineer's plan. The inspector is not specing anything, they only say yea or nea. I don't need them to tell me what I already know is ok to do is ok to do. The worst that happens here is that you get caught, and they make you pay the permit fee. This beam is going in the attic and will still be visible from there. I am not concealing any work.

Advertisement


Last edited by iminaquagmire; 05-07-2014 at 11:35 PM.
iminaquagmire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sizing a Generator for Submersible Well UpNorthEd Electrical 13 05-16-2014 09:30 PM
Using LVL's or Rim Boards instead of 2x for ledger Gunn317 Building & Construction 0 02-07-2013 08:33 PM
Attaching LVLs to beams Velvis Building & Construction 20 04-14-2012 03:06 PM
Sizing a dual shut off valve for a water line to fridge ericman Plumbing 10 08-19-2011 10:47 PM
Sizing a furnace - can't find one small enough Jim W HVAC 30 05-13-2009 09:38 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts