DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   sizing a flitch beam for small space (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/sizing-flitch-beam-small-space-24725/)

gorf 08-04-2008 12:21 PM

sizing a flitch beam for small space
 
I am doing a bathroom and want to move the door. My problem is that there is an existing beam that carries the roof weight resting on the wall that the doorway is in. I have 4 inches from the bottom of the beam to the top of the door. My flitch beam would be a total of 36 inches long and 4 inches thick. The weight would only be offset by about 9 inches. Does anyone know if a 4 inch flitch beam (or steal "I" beam) would be sufficient thickness for the roof weight of a 1 story house?

Background: There is a cantelver on the back of the house 24 foot long, the beam rests where the load bearing wall would be and the roof joists rest on the beam. The span that the existing beam carries is 12 foot resting on the wall.

Termite 08-04-2008 06:18 PM

This is something that an engineer should handle for you. There are so many variables that depend on how your house was framed, we can't begin to assist you with sizing the header.

I will say that I never see 4" W-shapes in residential remodel situations, except by foundation repair guys. Why not remove the existing header and use a longer, deeper header in its place. Two plies of LVL would likely span the opening with no issue. Is there a headroom problem that prevents you from doing this? Addition of a steel beam under an existing header might allow you to span the opening, but removal of the kingstud(s) will remove the header's lateral (roll) prevention.

A visit to an engineered wood specialist at a lumber yard (not a box store...A LUMBER YARD) would be a good idea. They could size an LVL beam to take the load if you take them all the dimensional information and let them know what is bearing on the wall. They don't charge to size LVL or PSL beams in most cases, and they can provide the computer-generated calcs showing the beam's performance.

gorf 08-04-2008 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 145903)
This is something that an engineer should handle for you. There are so many variables that depend on how your house was framed, we can't begin to assist you with sizing the header.

Thanks for the feedback. I talked to a GC today and he basically said that the only way he would do it was with 5.5 inch steel I beam. That would steal too much headroom so it looks like plan B = leave the door where it is.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:19 PM.