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Old 03-06-2007, 10:27 PM   #46
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Showing off my basement framing pics......


No, beer geek, I did not put one every 12 feet. There is one on every wall, but some are further apart.

I don't think I will need that many.

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Old 03-06-2007, 10:39 PM   #47
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Showing off my basement framing pics......


I understand about what you think you need but what do the electrical codes for your area say you should have?
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Old 03-06-2007, 10:44 PM   #48
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Code says one every 12 feet.
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Old 03-06-2007, 10:50 PM   #49
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Showing off my basement framing pics......


OK. Nevermind then.
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Old 03-08-2007, 09:35 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
That cat would have been a serious fire hazard on an old school wood burner.

It looks good, but all of those soffits make me cringe. I have been building two bedrooms and a living room for my girls down in our basement for the past 1-1/2 years. I had quite the mess of ducts and beams to wrap. It came out looking really nice, but it really tested my patience. Drywall is certainly not my thing.

If you can spare the headroom down there, a more simplistic fix to the drywall on the 2x2's could be to screw a sheet of OSB to the underside of it to sturdy everything up. I don't know if this is the best idea, but it worked for me. Run a bunch of 3" screws everywhere that might help and you have yourself a nice quick, cheap hillbilly fix. You might want to check this idea with someone who might have more experience in a situation like this.
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Old 03-08-2007, 10:00 PM   #51
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Showing off my basement framing pics......


Quote:
Originally Posted by steel View Post
That cat would have been a serious fire hazard on an old school wood burner.

It looks good, but all of those soffits make me cringe. I have been building two bedrooms and a living room for my girls down in our basement for the past 1-1/2 years. I had quite the mess of ducts and beams to wrap. It came out looking really nice, but it really tested my patience. Drywall is certainly not my thing.

If you can spare the headroom down there, a more simplistic fix to the drywall on the 2x2's could be to screw a sheet of OSB to the underside of it to sturdy everything up. I don't know if this is the best idea, but it worked for me. Run a bunch of 3" screws everywhere that might help and you have yourself a nice quick, cheap hillbilly fix. You might want to check this idea with someone who might have more experience in a situation like this.
The cat..ha, ha...

Duct work soffits: Yes, it can be a project to frame these. You have little head space to work with ...and ....you don't want to add any thickness to the framing to take away from the limited head space.

When we have to do a 'spread' like that in regards to soffits - We frame each side of the soffit so that the bottom plate of the frame is even with the bottom of the duct work. Then we use 3/4" Plywood ripped down to 24" widths x 8'. We use these widths like WIDE strapping. By doing it this way, you can make one 4'x8' sheet of plywood stretch a much larger area, than using entire sheets to frame the bottom of the soffits. The results are just as rigid.
This is really the way to do the soffit frame in order to eliminate any sagging. This type of frame is rigid enough that you could even use 1/4" sheetrock on the underside of the soffit.
Done it many times with great results.
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Old 03-08-2007, 10:11 PM   #52
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The soffit was a pain in the .

I would like to have used the 3/4" plywood, but if I told my husband that I wanted another power tool, (circular saw) I would not be very "yummy" any longer.

So, I decided to do the 2X2's. The head space is very limited.
I know that drywall will be a challenge, since this soffit is also part of 2 concrete beams that I had to deal with.

(If I was not the determined type, I would have given up long ago).

But I'm going to do it.

Now I'm going to tell you something that you guys may not believe, but very true.

I have put in approx. 700 wood scews, BY HAND, (yes, I'm crazy)
but I have found it much faster to do a pilot hole and then just grab by screwdriver and put them in, instead of changing bits.

(I plan to do the same with drywall) (Obviously, I'm in no real hurry).
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Old 03-08-2007, 11:10 PM   #53
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Showing off my basement framing pics......


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Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
The cat..ha, ha...

Duct work soffits: Yes, it can be a project to frame these. You have little head space to work with ...and ....you don't want to add any thickness to the framing to take away from the limited head space.

When we have to do a 'spread' like that in regards to soffits - We frame each side of the soffit so that the bottom plate of the frame is even with the bottom of the duct work. Then we use 3/4" Plywood ripped down to 24" widths x 8'. We use these widths like WIDE strapping. By doing it this way, you can make one 4'x8' sheet of plywood stretch a much larger area, than using entire sheets to frame the bottom of the soffits. The results are just as rigid.
This is really the way to do the soffit frame in order to eliminate any sagging. This type of frame is rigid enough that you could even use 1/4" sheetrock on the underside of the soffit.
Done it many times with great results.
Any chance you could post a pic (or pics) of this technique? I think I understand, but I'm not 100% sure. My supply and return mains are side by side and they run perpendicular to the joists. My soffits will need to be about 36" in width.

Also, on a related note: the hallway wall needs to be framed parallel and directly underneath the soffit. Any thoughts or concerns with this?

Ben
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Old 03-09-2007, 06:10 AM   #54
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Any chance you could post a pic (or pics) of this technique? I think I understand, but I'm not 100% sure. My supply and return mains are side by side and they run perpendicular to the joists. My soffits will need to be about 36" in width.
I am sorry that I don't have any pictures, I have not always made it a point to take pics of our work, especially the different phases of the work. I am now trying 'trying' to take pics of everything on the jobs to serve as better points of illustration and for discussions such as this.

In essence, what you do is to build a soffit front on each side of the duct work. This soffit front looks like a 'mini' wall. It consists of a top plate and a bottom plate, with 'short' studs placed 16" O.C. We prefer to use 2x4's for this rather than 2x3's, as the 2x4's are straighter, and there is less twisting than you get when using 2x3's for such an application. We take a measurement of the lowest hanging point of the duct work (Ceiling Joist to bottom of duct). Then take that measure ment and subtract 3" (The top and bottom plate: 1 1/2" + 1 1/2" = 3"). Add about 1/4" To clear any possible duct work 'projections (Screw heads, connection flanges, brackets, etc.) Thew final nukmber, then gives you the measurement of your short studs or jacks, in this case. Obviously, duble check all these measurements and also check to see if each area of the ductwork is the same measurement from start to finish of length of it's run.

We pre-assemble them and pre nail them 'on the floor', then lift them into place and nail them up onto each side of your Duct work. We usually also pre-measure and mark (The ceiling joists) where the soffit fronts will run. Snap a chalk line to align these soffit fronts so that they will be the same width (apart) ....all the way down the run of the ducts in the ceiling.
You could then use the 3/4" Plywood and install under the soffits...to the outside edge of them. In your case, it maybe easier to just go ahead and use the full widths of sheets edge to edge all the way down (rather than cutting 24" strips).
In your situation, this works well, since your ducts run perpendiculer to the joists, you can easily nail the 'top plate' of these soffit faces into the ceiling joists.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjstewa View Post
Also, on a related note: the hallway wall needs to be framed parallel and directly underneath the soffit. Any thoughts or concerns with this?
Ben
No concerns about this, just make sure that the screws or nails don't penetrate thru to the duct work overhead while attaching the wall to the bottom soffit members (3/4" plywood or strapping) I note ... "strapping" since, you could actually use strapping, rather than the 3/4" plywood for the soffit bottom, under these conditions.
You see, even tho the span will be 36", by installing a wall centered underneath the soffit, you will then be creating support under it. That span will now only by about 16" on each side, and then it will be supported by the 2x4 wall. Tie the top plate of that wall into the strapping underneath using about 2 1/4" to 2 1/2" Nails or screws. Attach the bottom plate securely to the concrete floor and you will have a solid framing arrangement.
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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 03-09-2007 at 07:08 AM.
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Old 03-09-2007, 10:37 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yummy mummy View Post
Now I'm going to tell you something that you guys may not believe, but very true.

I have put in approx. 700 wood scews, BY HAND, (yes, I'm crazy)
but I have found it much faster to do a pilot hole and then just grab by screwdriver and put them in, instead of changing bits.

(I plan to do the same with drywall) (Obviously, I'm in no real hurry).
You well deserve all the tool help you can get... get the tool early which you can use it at the earlier stage of your project.... I don't think anyone could possibly hand screwing when hanging drywalls... may be if you have two helpers who can help you keep the drywall in place... but even that, it is just too hard... even with a lift, you still only have a very short time period for the drywall be held steadily, power drive is not just save you effort, it let you put screw in fast enough... you can definitely not able to drill a pilot hole when hanging drywall....

so go get a Makita Drywall Screwgun ASAP (which can be used to screw other thing as well)... you won't regret and you will thank me for suggesting you to do it earlier rather than later.... the good thing is you got none, you should buy the good quality one rather than owning many pieces of not so good one like I do besides the good one...
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Old 03-09-2007, 11:04 AM   #56
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I don't understand what you mean by that I only have a short time to put drywall screw in.

If the lift holds it in place, can I not just put a screw into the drywall, by hand, no using a pilot hole?

I figure how difficult is it to put a screw into paper and gypsum?

So after I have put in a few to hold it in place, then I can do the rest?

Or am I just saying this because I have not yet tried it yet?

Can I buy a drywall bit to put in front of my drill? Would that work?
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Old 03-09-2007, 11:14 AM   #57
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The drywall lift will make the drywall very close to the position you want the drywall to be held at the ceiling or wall, but most of the time, not exactly the position, especially the wall, you still need to use your hand/body/leg to push the drywall to the final inch and then quickly screw the screw into the stud to held the drywall in place.

you cannot use drill to drive screw, it will burnt your drill at no time... and you end up waste money... you need high special screw driver with high torque and low rpm.
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Old 03-09-2007, 12:46 PM   #58
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you cannot use drill to drive screw, it will burnt your drill at no time... and you end up waste money... you need high special screw driver with high torque and low rpm.

I have never heard of this happening. Maybe for a contractor to constantly be using a drill in the wrong application daily, but for a job this size, the drill will be fine.

Yummy - I don't see why you would need to drill a pilot hole for drywall. The screws will drive right in. I would definately get a drywall bit or you will be blowing screws through the drywall all over the place.
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Old 03-09-2007, 12:59 PM   #59
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AtlanticWBConst, or others, can you give your opinion here:

I don't think you can use hammer drill (for example) to drive screws, may be it is OK for a couple of them, but once you do that for more, you will burn it... because it just don't have the torque...

may be you mixed up with the cordless 18v, those many design to drive screw as they have swith to change torque (or gear)... internally... but this is unusual for corded hammer drill which Yummy Mummy is using... I think your advice will make her burnt her hammer drill and waste hundreds of dollars....

and the theory is very simple, would you drive a manual car to put the gear 5 speed and start it on a up hill (60 degree)... would you do that to your car even it can move a bit... sure you can go up a bit, you probably burn your engine sooner than later...

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Old 03-09-2007, 01:39 PM   #60
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I don't know anything about burning drills, but if I put a drywall screw bit in front of my drill, would that not work, and how would I burn my drill that way?

I would be just putting in a drywall screw, slowly?

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