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-   -   Should I pour a cement base for a new tub? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/should-i-pour-cement-base-new-tub-50820/)

Leoskee 08-13-2009 08:40 AM

Should I pour a cement base for a new tub?
 
In order to make room for a p-trap I need to place a tub on a 2x6 platform. I am using a macerating toilet system (sanibest) and have to gravity feed the tub water into the unit. I used treated 2x6's to create the platform. I was thinking of laying 1x2's, length wise, on top of the platform in order to create a base where the bottom of the tub can get support from. I then thought about pouring a cement base inside of the 2x6 frame. Would that work better than using the 1x2's? The only problem I see with using the cement is that I would not get the true 6" that I need being that the 2x6 is really 5.5".

Also, I will be using a 2" vent. Do I bore a hole into the middle of a 2x4 in order to set up the plumbing or is there a better way to do it. Im concerned of cutting out a hole of that size in a stud.

Willie T 08-13-2009 10:52 AM

Is someone playing with us? :no:

Leoskee 08-13-2009 11:10 AM

I think the only one playing is you. Im looking for advice not sarcasm. Thanks.

DangerMouse 08-13-2009 11:32 AM

can't you add a 1" by board on top of (or under) the 5.5? that should bring it to 6"?

the other concern, of course, is cutting a 2" hole in the 2x4....
if it's a floor joist, that would be a no-no i should think.
non load-bearing interior wall studs, less concern, of course.

DM

Leoskee 08-13-2009 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DangerMouse (Post 313884)
can't you add a 1" by board on top of (or under) the 5.5? that should bring it to 6"?

the other concern, of course, is cutting a 2" hole in the 2x4....
if it's a floor joist, that would be a no-no i should think.
non load-bearing interior wall studs, less concern, of course.

DM


That is what my first plan was. I was going to put strips of 1x2's down. But I figured that if I poured cement into the frame that I made with the 2x6's it would be a solid base for the tub.

As far as the 2" holes, it would be on a non load baring wall so I guess I shouldn't be concerned.

DangerMouse 08-13-2009 12:21 PM

Make a mortar bed – If you removed your old tub, then it is likely that the previous mortar bed has been damaged. Chip the old mortar away and make a new one. This can be done with thin-set mortar or concrete and should be at least an inch or two thick. The thickness and proper construction of this mortar bed is extremely important because this is what will be supporting the bathtub when it is at its heaviest, when it is full of water.

hope this helps!

DM

Leoskee 08-13-2009 03:30 PM

I did not remove a tub. I am installing a new full bathroom in my basement. My sewer line is 8" above the slab. Due to this I am using a Sanibest macerating unit. It will run the toilet, sink and tub and shot the discharge up and over the bathroom into the main sewer line. Because I am not cutting into the slab I have to raise the tub. The company recommends 6" min. This is the only way that I can fit a p-trap. With all of that said, I would like to know if I should fill in the empty space within the 2x6 frame (it is 5'x32") or if I should put down 1x2 strips on top of the frame so that the tub rests on them instead.

Willie T 08-13-2009 03:32 PM

On the off chance that this is for real (and I doubt it), but also for anyone else anticipating this installation, it is quite simple.

As you have noticed, the under side of your tub is constructed in such a way so that it is almost impossible to pre-construct anything that will adequately support it. What you do is build a frame that supports the edges of the tub so that the bottom of the tub is held about 2" above the base (floor?) it will be sitting upon.

Take the tub out.

Mix up stiff concrete (thinset will do, but costly) and deposit eight or ten shovels full equally dispersed around where the bottom of the tub will sit. These wet piles of concrete should be 4 to 6 inches high. Keep them away from where the pipes go.

Now, with another man, carefully lower the tub down onto the concrete in exactly the place you want it to be. Leave it alone till the concrete sets.

You will have a firm foundation that totally conforms to all the curves and pockets on the bottom of the tub, and will support a completely full tub of water without moving a fraction of an inch.

Paragon 08-13-2009 03:55 PM

wow just wow lol

Good luck and be safe I will reserve my comments for another day, lol.

Leoskee 08-13-2009 07:43 PM

Am I missing something? Why am I getting comments about disbelief?

This was the closest pic that I could find. The actual rough in plans are in a pdf file on their website. Notice how high the shower stall is. Its up on a 2x6 platform. This is needed in order to fit the p-trap and also allow gravity to drain the shower into the unit behind the toilet.

In my case it is a tub. So if I lay out the tub as the manufacturer states I will have a tub that does not have a foundation. I like the idea of the columns of cement. I think that will be my best bet.

If my post does not make any sense to you even after looking at this pic then please do not post on my thread and keep your comments to yourself. Thanks.

http://www.sanifloproducts.com/images/SanibestElbow.jpg

Leoskee 08-13-2009 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie T (Post 314010)
On the off chance that this is for real (and I doubt it), but also for anyone else anticipating this installation, it is quite simple.

As you have noticed, the under side of your tub is constructed in such a way so that it is almost impossible to pre-construct anything that will adequately support it. What you do is build a frame that supports the edges of the tub so that the bottom of the tub is held about 2" above the base (floor?) it will be sitting upon.

Take the tub out.

Mix up stiff concrete (thinset will do, but costly) and deposit eight or ten shovels full equally dispersed around where the bottom of the tub will sit. These wet piles of concrete should be 4 to 6 inches high. Keep them away from where the pipes go.

Now, with another man, carefully lower the tub down onto the concrete in exactly the place you want it to be. Leave it alone till the concrete sets.

You will have a firm foundation that totally conforms to all the curves and pockets on the bottom of the tub, and will support a completely full tub of water without moving a fraction of an inch.


Thanks for the idea. I think I will do exactly like you posted.

Leoskee 08-13-2009 07:55 PM

By the way, my unit will be behind the wall so that you dont have to see all of the plumbing.

Willie T 08-13-2009 08:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leoskee (Post 314129)
Thanks for the idea. I think I will do exactly like you posted.

We installed Jacuzzis in most of our homes, and with water weighing 8.3 pounds a gallon, it is the only way we would stand behind an installation.

When you consider at least 20 gallons of water at 166 pounds and two adults weighing in at an average of the same thing, you need to handle no less than 500 pounds. Wet formed concrete is the only way. We tried foam, but it gives too much.

Willie T 08-13-2009 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leoskee (Post 314125)
Am I missing something? Why am I getting comments about disbelief?

This was the closest pic that I could find. The actual rough in plans are in a pdf file on their website. Notice how high the shower stall is. Its up on a 2x6 platform. This is needed in order to fit the p-trap and also allow gravity to drain the shower into the unit behind the toilet.

In my case it is a tub. So if I lay out the tub as the manufacturer states I will have a tub that does not have a foundation. I like the idea of the columns of cement. I think that will be my best bet.

If my post does not make any sense to you even after looking at this pic then please do not post on my thread and keep your comments to yourself. Thanks.

http://www.sanifloproducts.com/images/SanibestElbow.jpg

Sorry. But the idea of mounting the tub on 1x2's, added to the other post about what to do with leftover 2x4's made me think you were having some fun with the forum. My bad.

Willie T 08-13-2009 08:34 PM

Scroll down some on THIS SITE and you will find several pictures of a similar installation. We seldom went to all this trouble... but same idea.

Hint: If you want to be able to remove the tub sometime after setting it into the cement, lay a sheet of Visqueen atop the wet cement columns before you ease the tub down on top of them.


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