Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-23-2012, 02:51 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Shoring up a floor


Hello everyone ! I have a summer project that I need to start working on. There is a crawl space under my house and I need to brace the floor to hold a large aquarium. The aquarium will be 8' wide 7' front to back and 3' deep. that is 1000 gallons and 8600 lbs of water weight at 80% full so how ever the floor is braced it needs to be rock solid.

This is where I need the help. I really dont have a clue on how or what to use to brace the floor. Can I pour concrete pileings or something simular to make the foundation for the tank. the crawl space under the tank room is about 2' and I can pull up the flooring to work on the bracing and I can supply pics of anything needed.

Where should I start ?

in_the_tank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 03:00 PM   #2
Stay-at-home GC
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pittsburgh,PA
Posts: 638
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Shoring up a floor


An Engineer


You're essentially putting a Hot Tub in your living room. I wouldn't guess on something like that. If you're wrong the structural damage and risk to life would be severe.

Have you done something like this before? I suspect arrangements would have to be made for venting the extra humidity to the outside.

__________________
Can correctly identify Shinola 3 out of 5 times*
*Under ideal conditions

Some days, my Life needs a Rewind/Erase Button.
CplDevilDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 03:25 PM   #3
Member
 
cortell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 708
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Shoring up a floor


You're talking about 3-4x the load a normal residential floor is designed to bear. You should indeed talk to an engineer. My guess is you'd need to pour a rebar reinforced concrete pad, or a number of oversized footings and frame like crazy above it, probably using engineered beams and joists (or use concrete blocks). If you're lucky, you live where there is no frost line (or not much of one); otherwise you might be looking at some serious digging...all of which has to happen by hand.
cortell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 03:26 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: western Ny
Posts: 1,248
Rewards Points: 510
Default

Shoring up a floor


Definatly get an engineer. He will need to look at the structure under the floor (most likely 2x8/10 framing on 16" centers) to see what to recomend for structure under it. I would suspect there will be some digging to install a footing of some sort.
danpik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 03:36 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Shoring up a floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by CplDevilDog View Post
An Engineer


You're essentially putting a Hot Tub in your living room. I wouldn't guess on something like that. If you're wrong the structural damage and risk to life would be severe.

Have you done something like this before? I suspect arrangements would have to be made for venting the extra humidity to the outside.

At least a hot tub if not 2 or 3 in weight. You are correct if it caves the floor in the house is giong to be in rough shape. No I have never braced a floor with anything other than cinder blocks. I will not use blocks for this project, it needs to be rock solid and lasting 20+ years. All the tank details are figured out along with venting and elect.
in_the_tank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 03:42 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Shoring up a floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by cortell View Post
You're talking about 3-4x the load a normal residential floor is designed to bear. You should indeed talk to an engineer. My guess is you'd need to pour a rebar reinforced concrete pad, or a number of oversized footings and frame like crazy above it, probably using engineered beams and joists (or use concrete blocks). If you're lucky, you live where there is no frost line (or not much of one); otherwise you might be looking at some serious digging...all of which has to happen by hand.
I am in western South dakota there is a frost line
in_the_tank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 03:45 PM   #7
Member
 
cortell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 708
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Shoring up a floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by in_the_tank View Post
I will not use blocks for this project, it needs to be rock solid and lasting 20+ years.
Concrete blocks are plenty strong. More US homes are held up with concrete block foundations than poured concrete foundation walls. When built correctly--with vertical rebar and horizontal bond beams--they can hold up just about anything. They should rest on a poured concrete footing, though.
cortell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 04:40 PM   #8
Member
 
Ravenworks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 598
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Shoring up a floor


You could ask your eng about spread footings and bridge across them supporting the existing joist.
Ravenworks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 05:45 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Shoring up a floor


Any engineers on here want to take a stab at this ?
in_the_tank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 09:33 PM   #10
Residential Designer
 
AndyGump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Orange County CA.
Posts: 1,316
Rewards Points: 548
Send a message via Skype™ to AndyGump
Default

Shoring up a floor


How about hiring an engineer rather than asking for a free design?

They need to eat too.

Andy.
__________________
Residential Drafter/Designer
www.draftinginoc.com
AndyGump is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 09:46 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Shoring up a floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyGump View Post
How about hiring an engineer rather than asking for a free design?

They need to eat too.

Andy.
yes they do, but so do I. isn't this a diy forum ?
in_the_tank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 09:56 PM   #12
Residential Designer
 
AndyGump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Orange County CA.
Posts: 1,316
Rewards Points: 548
Send a message via Skype™ to AndyGump
Default

Shoring up a floor


What you are asking for is way outside IRC or any prescriptive practices.
Yours is a project that could very well involve life safety issues.

Even if you wanted to get his permitted to be compliant and safe your Building department will probably want engineering on this. Not something designed by knuckleheads that have never visited, seen or taken one measurement of your house from a DIY talk forum.

Sorry, I am sounding a bit nasty, I will stop.

Andy.
__________________
Residential Drafter/Designer
www.draftinginoc.com
AndyGump is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 10:00 PM   #13
Member
 
cortell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 708
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Shoring up a floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by in_the_tank

yes they do, but so do I. isn't this a diy forum ?
It's for getting advice on specific questions or general questions. It's not a site where you describe what you want to accomplish and someone crunches the numbers for you--be it materials list, costs or structural specs. Expect ideas, not specifics.
cortell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2012, 10:09 PM   #14
Stay-at-home GC
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pittsburgh,PA
Posts: 638
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Shoring up a floor


I think what Andy meant to say is, we get a lot of questions here asking for Engineering design.

We like answering DIY questions but there are so many things to consider with a project like this that we don't feel comfortable offering off-the-cuff solutions.

What are the soil conditions in your crawl space?
Is there currently a slab poured in the crawl space?
How far away from your exterior foundation are you going to be?
Since you'll probably want to pump the concrete, an Engineer would be able to design a proper mix for you.

See how quickly things get complicated?

Try calling around, often you can find a local Engineer that can work with a homeowner for a very reasonable fee. An ounce of prevention is worth about 8000 pounds of cure in this case.
__________________
Can correctly identify Shinola 3 out of 5 times*
*Under ideal conditions

Some days, my Life needs a Rewind/Erase Button.
CplDevilDog is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to CplDevilDog For This Useful Post:
Ravenworks (04-24-2012)
Old 04-23-2012, 11:25 PM   #15
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Shoring up a floor


Quote:
Originally Posted by CplDevilDog View Post
I think what Andy meant to say is, we get a lot of questions here asking for Engineering design.

We like answering DIY questions but there are so many things to consider with a project like this that we don't feel comfortable offering off-the-cuff solutions.

What are the soil conditions in your crawl space?..........dry since 1924
Is there currently a slab poured in the crawl space?.......no
How far away from your exterior foundation are you going to be? 1' at the closest.
Since you'll probably want to pump the concrete, an Engineer would be able to design a proper mix for you.......... There is no way to pump ready mix into this space, 5gl buckets are about the only way.The space is a bedroom with 2 small windows.

See how quickly things get complicated?........Yes I do but this cant be that complicated. It's basicly just a fishtank stand.

Try calling around, often you can find a local Engineer that can work with a homeowner for a very reasonable fee. An ounce of prevention is worth about 8000 pounds of cure in this case.
........I hear you but there has got to be a good way to diy this without calling out the national guard.

in_the_tank is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to repair a concrete floor we just had repaired! timbo59 Flooring 11 01-04-2012 06:15 PM
First Floor Laundry Room Floor Drain install? hammerlane Plumbing 9 10-21-2011 09:12 AM
Dryer duct hole thru band joist & floor joist justplumducky General DIY Discussions 12 10-05-2010 12:31 PM
2nd floor air flow/pressure fgillis HVAC 7 02-24-2009 04:58 AM
Levelling wood floor gomi_otaku Building & Construction 13 11-27-2008 07:45 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.