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Old 09-23-2007, 05:04 PM   #1
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Shimming Floor Joists?


My floor joists lifted off of my foundation walls a few years before I bought the house as the walls sank. Any thoughts on what I can shim them with to redistribute the weight back onto the walls? Any other advice? Thanks!

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Old 09-23-2007, 07:57 PM   #2
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Shimming Floor Joists?


sounds bad, pictures would help.

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Old 09-23-2007, 08:30 PM   #3
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Shimming Floor Joists?


I've attached a picture showing 3 joists, 2 of which have lifted. They are held up by a non-floating wall. However, others that aren't held up by a floating wall are no longer resting on the foundation wall, though the gap isn't as substantial as noted in the picture. You'll see to the far right, the third joist is resting on the foundation. It isn't touching the non-floated wall.
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Shimming Floor Joists?-dsc_3708-copy.jpg  
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Old 09-24-2007, 06:56 PM   #4
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Shimming Floor Joists?


That's an odd framing, foundation interface. We have two 2x6 PT pieces of wood sitting on the foundation and the floor joists sit on them. there are a few options you can use, depending on the gap involved. Slate, steel, masonary filler are a few that come to mind.
The reason the foundation moved needs to be fixed first.
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Old 09-24-2007, 10:22 PM   #5
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Shimming Floor Joists?


Thanks, Ron. Apparently in the 60s in Saskatchewan, this was how they laid floor joists. I've dealt with the drainage issue that caused the sinking, so the walls shouldn't be moving any longer. I've had it suggested I use grout to fill the gap. Any thoughts? How would a guy use steel? Thanks so much!!
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Old 09-24-2007, 10:30 PM   #6
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Shimming Floor Joists?


Assuming an 8" deep block and a 1/4" gap, how deep do you expect to push in "grout"? Slate or steele could be inserted into the gap to support the entire load.
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Old 09-24-2007, 10:33 PM   #7
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Shimming Floor Joists?


Yeah, good point. If I used pieces of 1/8" steel plate, I could stack them up. Less messy than grout. Would you recommend lifting the joists slightly before inserting the steel to redistribute the load? Thanks so much for the help!!
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Old 09-25-2007, 07:47 AM   #8
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Shimming Floor Joists?


I would set the joists as close to their original position as possible. As a unit, they support the load of the walls.
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