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Old 02-28-2012, 01:21 PM   #1
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Shimming floor joist


I am on the back half of a main floor / kitchen renovation, and am in the process of putting down the new bamboo nail-down floors. Part of the house is old 3/8" plywood, so in the kitchen, I have put down underlayment on top of the 6" wide tongue-and-groove sub-floor to give a flat surface.

When I put this down, it felt like the floor had a dip in it in the middle, and sure enough, putting a 4' level across the floor, I noticed in the center the floor height was 1/4" lower than the edges. So after freaking a bit, and ruling out water damage (none), I noticed that one of the 2x8 joists is 7 1/4" thick instead of 7 1/2" like all the others in the room. It is this way for 2 feet, and then starts thickening to the full 7 1/2" by the 8' mark.

So... I assume that I can just shim this up, but wanted to make sure before I got started. Is it just good enough to shim under each 1x6" subfloor plank with cedar shims from each side of the joist? Or is there something else that I should do (shim and then sister a 2x8 to this floor joist? The joist is sturdy and has no issues, while sistering would be a major pain since there is a ton of electrical cables and water lines and heating ducts running through this area.

Thanks.

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Old 02-28-2012, 01:34 PM   #2
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Shimming floor joist


Or, you can pour some self levelling cement? Might be an easier option to bridge the sag.

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Old 02-28-2012, 07:52 PM   #3
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Shimming floor joist


Unfortunately, it's a nail-down hardwood, and I wouldn't want to think of nailing through that. I also hear self-leveling cement isn't so good on wood, so then changing a segment to glue-down wouldn't work either...

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Or, you can pour some self levelling cement? Might be an easier option to bridge the sag.
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:13 AM   #4
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Shimming floor joist


I've used it on wood and had good results. You can glue the new hardwood in that area if you wanted. You need to make sure the sub-floor is screwed down tightly to the joists so it doesn't move, which would provide an adequate substrate for the leveller.

Or, you could lift and shim the joist as you suggested but this will be alot of work, and you may not get your desired result.

Last edited by psilva8; 02-29-2012 at 09:16 AM.
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