Shifting A Basement Jack Post - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-23-2014, 09:50 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Northern Indiana
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 12
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


Hello,

New to the forum as a poster today, although I've read lots of good information here for several years. I have a question I'm hoping someone can help with regarding finishing my basement.

My home is a brick ranch, about 1800 sqft, built in 1980. It has a full basement with poured concrete walls.

So - basement is unfinished and I am in the process of laying out walls to finish roughly 2/3 of the space. I have one corner that is about 3' deep and 12' wide. The footprint of this corner is mirrored on the main floor above, and the load-bearing outer walls fall directly over the top of the concrete foundation. This is the only portion of the foundation that extends beyond the standard rectangular shape of the rest of the house.

In this "cove" (I suppose you could call it) there is a beam extending across to carry the load of the floor joists which are 2x10 spaced every 16". Every other joist is a pair of 2x10's sistered together. The beam itself is comprised of three full-length 2x10's nailed together. The total span of that beam between foundation support on either end is a shade over 12', something like 12' 3". Directly in the center of the beam is a steel jack post which is not cemented into the floor slab. I'm not sure if there is a footing present under the slab in that location or not.

What I would like to be able to do, is install a new steel jack post of similar design 19" to the left (end of the tape in attached photo) of where the current post resides. This would put the post inside of my planned location for a studded wall which runs perpendicular to the 12' beam. In the photo you may be able to make out the chalk lines snapped on the floor representing the proposed wall location.



The floor joists extend roughly 16' from the main center beam of the house to this shorter 12' beam location.



I'm hoping that a shift of 19" for this post is still within the limits to support that beam over a 12' space. I'm hoping someone can give me a good qualified guess to see if it is worth pursuing further with the aide of an engineer or inspector.

I will do my best to answer any questions to help paint a better picture, if needed.

Thank You!
-Ryan Folk

Advertisement

frfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2014, 10:02 PM   #2
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 8,388
Rewards Points: 3,570
Blog Entries: 4
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


You definitely need a footing under the beam. Not sure about the span limits.

Advertisement

__________________
Do not PM with questions that can be asked in a forum. I will not respond.
joed is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2014, 10:10 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 1,016
Rewards Points: 884
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


My concern would be why this beam was put in to start with.It does not look original to the house and loks like maybe a previous HO put it in to fix some sagging joist.That may be why the original joists are sistered?
What is the beam in the bottom picture bearing on to the right? Thru the new wall?
A lot of things don't look right from the pics.
mako1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2014, 10:14 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 1,016
Rewards Points: 884
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


Just out of curiosity Joed.How would you know that from these pitures.Can you explain it to me?
mako1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2014, 10:21 PM   #5
Member
 
Msradell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Louisville Kentucky
Posts: 1,316
Rewards Points: 778
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


To me it looks like they were sister to just to make up the extra distance. Because that section of the foundation jogs out the same length as used in the rest of the basement didn't work. If that's the case then the beam itself was original, whether the post was original may be a different question.

How long is that beam? How close to the center is the post at this time compared to where you want to move it to? Is the beam setting into the concrete on both ends? Answers to these questions will help provide you a better answer.
__________________
Written using Dragon Naturally Speaking
Msradell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2014, 10:32 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Northern Indiana
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 12
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


Quote:
Originally Posted by Msradell View Post
To me it looks like they were sister to just to make up the extra distance. Because that section of the foundation jogs out the same length as used in the rest of the basement didn't work. If that's the case then the beam itself was original, whether the post was original may be a different question.

How long is that beam? How close to the center is the post at this time compared to where you want to move it to? Is the beam setting into the concrete on both ends? Answers to these questions will help provide you a better answer.
The beam is original to the house. Your assessment of the beams location and reasoning is spot-on. The beam is supported on either end by the foundation. In the photo the beam is disappearing between two studs but immediately behind those studs is 1" thick EPS foam and then right into the pocket in the foundation which carries the beam.

The beam is just over 12' in length and the post is currently dead center. For what it's worth, the post is identical to the other three posts that are supporting the center beam of the house, so I would imagine they all went in at the same time.

-Ryan
frfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2014, 09:06 AM   #7
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 8,388
Rewards Points: 3,570
Blog Entries: 4
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


Quote:
Originally Posted by mako1 View Post
Just out of curiosity Joed.How would you know that from these pitures.Can you explain it to me?
How would you know if there is a footing? You can't. Some excavation is probably necessary.
How would you know if the span was OK if moved? You hire a professional who does this for a living to do the calculations.
__________________
Do not PM with questions that can be asked in a forum. I will not respond.
joed is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2014, 10:37 PM   #8
Member
 
Msradell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Louisville Kentucky
Posts: 1,316
Rewards Points: 778
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


Since its original and centered I would be afraid to move it without having a structural engineer make his recommendations. I'm also quite sure it probably does have a footing under it since it was part of the original design.
__________________
Written using Dragon Naturally Speaking
Msradell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2014, 10:52 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 15
Rewards Points: 26
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


Obviously, as has already been said, get an engineer out to tell you exactly what can/cannot be done. But moving the post 19" shouldn't be a big deal in terms of the beam with it being three 2x10's and only spanning 12', in regards to the support needed by the beam. The thing I think you're going to run into trouble with is the footing underneath, as has been brought up already. With that post not supporting a crazy amount of weight (in comparison to a full house-length beam or something similar), the footing may only be 2-4' wide. Meaning there could only be 12" on either side of the current post location. Moving the post 19" would obviously mean taking it completely off, or even maybe just far enough off center of the footing that it runs out of the support limits.
gouldjustin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2014, 05:55 AM   #10
Member
 
Davejss's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Northern Massachusetts
Posts: 413
Rewards Points: 380
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


Get your local building inspector to come take a look. I'm betting that if he allows you to move the post you will first have to jack hammer the floor and place a new concrete footing below the new post location.
Davejss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2014, 06:22 AM   #11
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,309
Rewards Points: 2,196
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


The span is 12 feet, so moving the post 19 inches (about 1.5 ft) would leave you with two spans, one 4.5 ft, one 7.5 ft. Your engineer will of course run the calculations and determine if the longer span is acceptable. Your engineer will also design a footing, and detail the required connections between the top of the post and the beam, and the bottom of the post and the footing. From the photo, it looks like the existing post is not tied in either at the top or the bottom, which is poor practice, since the post could slip either at the top or the bottom in the event of an earthquake or impact to the house.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2014, 07:28 AM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 20
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


If you look on line there are calculators that will tell you the span ability of 3 2x10. Also you can calculate the load limit. My guess is that the beam can span 8 feet. 2 2x10 can span a sliding glass door. If the first floor is not load bearing then you might be surprised about the weight the beam is supporting.

Are the other posts cemented in the floor?
greencat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2014, 11:01 PM   #13
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Northern Indiana
Posts: 4
Rewards Points: 12
Default

Shifting a Basement Jack Post


[QUOTE=greencat;

Are the other posts cemented in the floor?[/QUOTE]

No. The other 3 posts on the center beam of the house are installed in similar fashion. The reasoning behind this is purely asthetic. The post would fall in the far back corner of a room if left alone and wouldn't really be in the way. Its just one of those things I can't leave alone... So close, but so far.

I appreciate everyones replies thus far.

Advertisement

frfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to - prevent basement mold crazymountain How To Guides 36 07-23-2014 07:02 PM
build around a post jack warmar Carpentry 5 08-23-2011 09:18 AM
Basement Metal Support Post virgolibranyc Building & Construction 4 09-07-2010 04:07 PM
wooden basement post rotten on bottom truckinkat Building & Construction 1 09-29-2008 06:35 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts