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Old 07-21-2014, 05:58 PM   #1
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shed repair discussion


Hi everyone,

When I bought my home 5 years ago, it came with a useful shed on the property (and a ride-on lawn mower included inside). The shed has been useful for storing the mower and other lawncare devices.

After the harsh winter, and perhaps due to general aging, this spring and summer I have noticed water damage inside the roof sheathing. It is clear this is coming from degrading shingles on the roof.

The siding is also rotting out at the bottom of the shed, although the shingles and roof sheathing are my primary concerns. Last summer I once discovered a carpenter ant infestation. Spraying ant-killer spray seemed to take care of that last year. This year there has been sawdust visible on the floor and walls of the shed, perhaps speaking to more carpenter ants (or termites) but I have yet to see evidence of any actual wood-boring bugs this year. I do believe that the bones of the shed are good, but with the ants/sawdust I am concerned about this.

Here is an imgur album with pics of the inside and outside of the shed.
http://imgur.com/a/j2H1m#0

1. My top priority is shingle replacement and roof repair. I assume I need to remove all existing shingles, replace any damaged OSB sheathing, and then install new shingles. I've never done shingles before. What should I buy (what nails as well)? Is this worth getting a cheap roofing nailer (I have a compressor) or should I hand-nail?

2. The shed is under a tree, and you can see from the pictures that the shed roof is suffering from moisture issues and moss growth. Any new shingles would eventually suffer the same fate. Is this worth repairing, or should I consider replacing with a plastic shed from HD or the like (which I assume can take the environment under the trees better in the long-term? I assume replacing the shed with a plastic shed or moving/rebuilding a wooden shed in a better location is an order of magnitude more expensive than repairing the existing shed.

3. Siding - I know on a house the rule is to keep the siding 6-8 inches above grade to prevent rot from splashback. There's no concrete foundation on this shed to get the siding above grade, so if I'm going to repair or replace the siding, what's a good approach?

Your opinions are appreciated.

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Old 07-22-2014, 07:07 AM   #2
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shed repair discussion


Sorry to say, I don't see much worth saving and would replace the shed.

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Old 07-22-2014, 07:14 AM   #3
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shed repair discussion


Your shed is identical to mine in almost every way, except rot. Mine is in need of a new roof. Not leaking, but the cheap stick-on shingles are peeling apart. I would try to repair it if you can. Any chance you can raise it up and put more concrete blocks under it to get it off the ground a little higher before replacing the side panels?

The reason why I say repair it, is because how do you repair a plastic shed when it cracks, breaks, or warps? You don't. You buy another.

You can always add to the wooden shed (build shelves, more storage, ect.), but how do you do that with a plastic shed? More plastic add-ons?

Last edited by r0ckstarr; 07-22-2014 at 07:21 AM.
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Old 07-22-2014, 08:48 AM   #4
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shed repair discussion


Personally, I would repair the roof, jack up the building, and put 6"X8"X16" CMU around the bottom of the building. I would pin every other one to the concrete pad and install a new lower plate with PT. All in all the structure is not that bad. The 8" height increase will keep the plate and lower structure from contacting water.
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Old 07-22-2014, 08:54 AM   #5
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All classic examples on how not to build a shed.
Slab was pored to low, looks like they did not use a pressure treated bottom plate, let the shingles go to long before replacing.
It could be saved, but it may take more work and materials then it's worth.
The right way with a slab like that would have been to have installed a row of 8" blocks on the slab and build the walls on top of that.
I just hate when I see shingles installed like that on a gambrel roof like that, bending the shingles over like that where the angle changes is going to cause them to crack.
I install them as if it was two different roofs.
Run the shingles up the steep side first then on the top I install a row of ice and water shield, a drip edge, starter strip then start running the shingles.
No bending involved.
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Old 07-25-2014, 02:19 PM   #6
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shed repair discussion


Thanks for the comments. Let's address a few.


Quote:
Originally Posted by r0ckstarr View Post
The reason why I say repair it, is because how do you repair a plastic shed when it cracks, breaks, or warps? You don't. You buy another.
That's true. However, since I think the fact that the shed is under a tree is causing the roof issues, and I think a plastic shed would survive those conditions much better, I was thinking a plastic shed would be fine for the location (and thus it wouldn't crack, break, or warp). Perhaps that's wishful thinking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by landfillwizard View Post
Personally, I would repair the roof, jack up the building, and put 6"X8"X16" CMU around the bottom of the building. I would pin every other one to the concrete pad and install a new lower plate with PT. All in all the structure is not that bad. The 8" height increase will keep the plate and lower structure from contacting water.
Lot's of questions from this response:

1. How do I jack this up? What jacks do I need? Where do I get them? How do I begin the jacking process (since the building is sitting on the ground right now)?

2. You're suggesting CMU blocks as new bearing points. Will these hold up when sitting on the ground?

3. You said "pin every other [CMU block] to the concrete pad". What concrete pad? As far as I can tell there is a lumber frame sitting on grade (or floating above it where the critters have excavated underneath.

4. I assume the existing frame base of the shed is pressure treated already, since it seems to be in good condition. If it's not, of course, jacking the structure could cause a major failure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
The right way with a slab like that would have been to have installed a row of 8" blocks on the slab and build the walls on top of that.
More talk of a slab... I really don't think there is one. Look at this image: http://imgur.com/a/j2H1m#8 That is taken with the front doors open, zoomed in on the shed's floor and where the frame appears to me to contact the ground. This looks like lumber sitting on dirt.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
I just hate when I see shingles installed like that on a gambrel roof like that, bending the shingles over like that where the angle changes is going to cause them to crack.
I install them as if it was two different roofs.
Run the shingles up the steep side first then on the top I install a row of ice and water shield, a drip edge, starter strip then start running the shingles.
No bending involved.
This is an excellent point. Can you give me some links to ice/water shield and drip edge products so I can get a sense of what I would need to buy if I'm going to fix this?


One other very important question - if I wind up elevating the shed, how do I get the mower in and out? Right now I can drive it in and out the rear door opening with the use of two ramp pieces that presumably whoever built the shed put together. They are basically 2x6 pieces built to form two little ramp planks. They won't be safe to use at a steeper angle, not to mention the mower will bottom out over the edge of the shed without a much longer ramp.

Last edited by JKeefe; 07-25-2014 at 02:23 PM.
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Old 07-26-2014, 07:17 AM   #7
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shed repair discussion


Its a small incorrectly built shed. Sure it can be repaired, but by the time you take it apart to fix it you're only save a few 2x4'S and maybe some sheeting. My labor is valuable (have enough other projects) would be more than the material savings. Do the math and good luck
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Old 07-26-2014, 07:22 AM   #8
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My Bad! I looked quickly at the floor and the gray paint looked like concrete. With that being said, I agree with 47 47 that the time spent repairing the shed would be better spent putting up the plastic shed you want.

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