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Old 10-21-2013, 03:47 PM   #1
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Shed Project


Okay, so I'm new to the chatroom and relatively new to DIY in general. I've built a large deck, resided a house in cedar clapboards, but very little actual construction. I'm going to take on a large shed/out building.

I know enough to get myself deeply in trouble I think but that's part of the fun. I've been doing a ton of research on contruction methods and looking at a lot of the pre-made sheds that you can have delivered. But many questions and contradictions remain.

Here's some of my starting specs:

I want to build a 12 x 24 shed, 10 in 12 pitch, I live in CT, so snow is a consideration.

If I check 3 of the local companies who sell these small buildings, they use only 2x4 construction with no rafter ties, but they do use collar ties, and no ridge beams. And my town approves this construction.

Yet everywhere I read up on this, everyone recommends building well above these specs.

So is it a case of the small building companies are only building to the minimum codes will permit and if I really want a shed to last then I should build bigger...?

Chip

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Old 10-21-2013, 03:58 PM   #2
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It does not have to be bigger just better.
It's common to see garages and shed built with 2 X 4's Plenty strong enough, in fact whole homes have been built with nothing but 2 X 4's for a hundred years or more.
Only reason to go with 2 X 6's is so you can fit more insulation in the walls.
A ridge beam and collar ties will also help to keep the walls from spreading and the roof from sagging.

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Old 10-21-2013, 04:29 PM   #3
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a ridge beam or rafter ties are required to prevent the weight of the roof from pushing out the tops of the load bearing walls.

a ceiling joist is a type of rafter tie. rafter ties are typically found in the lower 1/3 of the rafter (between the top of the wall and ridge board).

a collar tie connects opposing rafters to the ridge board and prevents loads from pulling a rafter away from the ridge board. Collar ties do not prevent rafter thrust from pushing out the top of walls. Collar ties are normally found in the upper 1/3 of the rafter.

CT codes are found here http://www.ct.gov/dcs/cwp/view.asp?a...=521446&dcsNav

the listed codes are the bare minimums that you can get away with when building. for example, a floor joist that meets the code may not fail and fall to the floor below, but you may find the floor to be very bouncy and dishes rattle in your china hutch. it is always better to build better than the minimums, especially when it is for yourself.

good luck!
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Old 10-21-2013, 04:30 PM   #4
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Have you considered a metal building? Way more bang for the buck sq. footage wise.
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Old 10-22-2013, 08:36 AM   #5
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Thanks for the prompt replies.

Firstly, metal sheds are cheaper and if this was down the back of the yard and out of the way, I'd do that in a heartbeat. But this is going to be used for multiple purposes and will be close to an entertainment area and pool. So aesthetics are a major factor in the design, hence the 10/12 roof to match my house and give it a little charm.

Sorry, "bigger" was a poor choice of words. I should've said "beefier" maybe or just "stronger".

I "think" I understand the purpose and role of collar ties and rafter ties. Collars for up thrust and rafters to keep the walls from pushing out. The challenge is in the variance of information and contradictions out there.

I'm building myself with very little to no help at all. So far, I'm leaning toward using trusses with collar ties attached with 1/2" plywood gussets, and rafter ties also with gussets. If I do 24" OC framing would it be okay to use the rafter ties on every second truss?

Then, I'm thinking of going even crazier and maybe putting an angle on it and making it an L shaped building. This angled section would be an 8' x 8' section. I may or may not wall it off for it's own entrance. So this would require me to tie the roof in and create a 3rd gable end... Nothing like a challenge right.

Chip
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Old 10-22-2013, 09:09 AM   #6
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If you build with trusses as you mentioned all the collar ties, gussets and rafter ties are not necessary as the truss rafters takes care of all that and you will have a much better building.

My personal opinion on a 12x24 building.

They look about as attractive as a rail box car or a connex box. It's been proven that a square area is a more user friendly space and I would be considering a 18x18 (324 sq. ft. ) building with purchased truss rafters as opposed to a 288 sq. ft. structure stick built one piece at a time.
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Old 10-22-2013, 09:09 AM   #7
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A truss is an engineered structure that requires no additional bracing of any kind. You can build them yourself but must closely follow design and construction details or they could fail catastrophically. They will prove more difficult to install by yourself too.
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Old 10-22-2013, 09:32 AM   #8
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Thanks again...

I'd planned on making my own trusses but from a plan I've been given. They're made up of a pair of a pair of rafters and a ceiling joist. And now that I think of it, I was really using the wrong terminology before as it isn't really a rafter tie. I should probably be using bottom chord or ceiling joist.

The plan shows them as being fabricated with the 1/2" plywood gussets.

As to shape, it's a best use issue again. I'm trying to make best use of a space that already exists. As it stands now, that little 8' x 8' section may not be the greatest space but it would be dead ground due if I don't get it inside the building.

Chip
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Old 10-22-2013, 11:22 AM   #9
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HI Chip, for a little thing like the shed you are talking about you would be best off getting someone to design it for you. They can design to your local building department's requirements, so they will be happy and you can get a permit.
They can also design it to fit how it might be easiest for you to build and the least expensive way to build and still be up to code.
That is what we are here for.

Andy.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:16 PM   #10
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Thanks Andy.

I've got my hands on a plan for a shed with the basic construction but I'm making modifications to fit my situation. So it looks like I've got to check with the town office to see if it meets requirements. I've spoken to them before on other projects and they've been quite helpful and have given advice although they are careful in how they give it.

Chip

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