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Old 03-23-2013, 05:37 PM   #1
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Hi All

I am curious what people think of the following.

Is it better to buy a pre-made shed (from lowes, hd or costco), or make one myself out of wood.

is there a cost savings?

do i need a level foundation for the pre-made?

i plan on something between 7 x 10 ft

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Old 03-23-2013, 05:54 PM   #2
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ummmm, yeah lvl for any thing.


just ask how much you value your time and effort. that will answer your other questions

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Old 03-23-2013, 06:15 PM   #3
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What's your plans for it?
7 X 10 is tiny!!
No one has ever built or bought a shed of garage that was to big in the history of time.
Any shed needs a foundation of some sort, if not the floor sags, the doors will not work right and it's pretty much useless.
What's your skill level?
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Old 03-23-2013, 06:24 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
No one has ever built or bought a shed of garage that was to big in the history of time.
Quoted for truth.

I think there was another lengthy discussion on this very same topic. I'll see if I can find the thread and link back if I do.

Found it:
I need a shed for additional storage. Wood or plastic?

Hope it adds more information to what you're looking for.

Last edited by r0ckstarr; 03-23-2013 at 06:28 PM.
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Old 03-23-2013, 08:36 PM   #5
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When you buy a shed kit you are paying a considerable amount extra so that you can simply follow directions and with the help of a friend have a shed built in a day or two. How do I know? Because that was me last year. I'm not disappointed with how it turned out but let's just say I would've built a much more heavy duty shed if I was to start from scrap. I could easily kick through the door panel or wall if I wanted in. We paid $1k for a 10'x10' w/ loft that was on sale. I'm the type that would enjoy planning & building a shed from scratch however my wife knows how quickly (or should I say slowly) that I work so we agreed on a shed kit.

If you have the skill & patience and would enjoy designing & building your own shed then I highly recommend you do so. If not, the shed kit isn't so bad.

Regardless of which route you go, a strong & level foundation cannot be overemphasized. Doesn't matter how great of a shed you put together if it wobbles when you walk through it.
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Old 03-23-2013, 08:45 PM   #6
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Just a few things I've seen in story bought sheds.
No felt paper on the roof and no house wrap under the siding.
Shingles and siding were stapled not nailed on.
Only two runners so the center sagged.
Used 4 X 4's for runners so it sat to close to the ground and the siding and trim rotted.
Wood cross bucks on the outsides of the doors always rot out and cause the siding behind it to rot.
Only two small hinges on the door so they soon start to sag.
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Old 03-23-2013, 09:01 PM   #7
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Oh wait...are you talking about buying a kit or buying one already assembled?
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Old 03-23-2013, 09:23 PM   #8
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The kits and pre-mades are made to maximize profit, so the materials used are the bottom of the barrel in most cases. 2 x 3 walls, 24 inches on center, No felt, cheapest shingles made etc etc etc. But these all seem to have nice little shutters to attract the wife. Ever Notice that? Your work/storage shed becomes the wifes playhouse that daddy never built her, so she talks you into buying a POS kit, or a big box POS. Frankly, as soon as I see somebody posting about building something that is off of a 4 foot module like 10 x 10 I cringe. I hate waste. I mean 10 x 10 is one square, for goodness sake. Drive in the mower, and thats it, youre done! No room left!
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Old 03-23-2013, 09:59 PM   #9
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Buying a pre-made shed would spare you the time in making. Making a shed on your own is fun. Well, it does include a lot of effort but if you see the output you'll probably be happy. The worst part is if everything turns out wrong.
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Old 03-23-2013, 10:07 PM   #10
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We have a push mower which takes up very little room in our 10x10. At our 'dream house' I'd have way bigger than 10x10 but for where we live now and having a 40'x40' backyard, its the perfect size for us. I'm kinda glad we did it b/c it made me appreciate the quality of building something yourself to your own specs.
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Old 03-23-2013, 11:51 PM   #11
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Build it yourself, bigger, and on a concrete slab. You will enjoy the space, get what you want, and add value to your property. And you learn skills, gain experience, and have the satisfaction of DIY. IMO...
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Old 03-24-2013, 05:10 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fetzer85 View Post
We have a push mower which takes up very little room in our 10x10. At our 'dream house' I'd have way bigger than 10x10 but for where we live now and having a 40'x40' backyard, its the perfect size for us. I'm kinda glad we did it b/c it made me appreciate the quality of building something yourself to your own specs.
Yeah I guess 10 x 10 is OK for you then, but why not 8 x 12? Just wondered.
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:16 AM   #13
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Yeah I guess 10 x 10 is OK for you then, but why not 8 x 12? Just wondered.
It was on sale. If I built from scratch I prob would have done 12x12.
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Old 03-24-2013, 12:34 PM   #14
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Thanx everyone for their feedback, it looks like everyone is leaning towards building from scratch.

Why 8x10? Dont know? my backyard is about 16ft to 20ft deep, havent measured it yet and about 45 ft across.

I plan on putting my snow blower, lawn blower, charcoal for bbq, patio furniture and random garden tools.

My backyard is pretty much empty right now, but i plan on building a wood deck, vegetable garden and shed!

Skill level, well, i can frame, hammer nails, screw screws, etc, etc, i think it would be a great learner experience.

My only concern i guess is a level foundation, that is the most important.
What do people do? Concrete pad? Those concrete feet (with the cross section to insert wood)?
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Old 03-24-2013, 01:17 PM   #15
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Pro's and cons to any of them.
A concrete pad is nice but expencive and needs to be high enough above grade that the siding is at lease 6" up off the grade so the siding does not rot out.
For a small slab like that they will hit you with a short load charge.

I'm not a big fan of those blocks you just sit on the ground, far to prone to sink and a royal pain to get them all level.

If you build it on top of 6 X 6 or 4 X 6 skids you could always move it if you moved and may not even need a permit for it since it's not attached the ground.

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