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Old 07-19-2010, 07:59 PM   #1
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self furring metal lath installation - help


today i nailed up the wire lath on the skirting, over the felt paper. it's on a post and pier foundation skirt, so vertical walls.

all the sources i read about stucco never mentioned anything about how the lath needed to be oriented.
today a mason friend told me there is a "up" and a "down" and a right and wrong way of placing it. basically that the correct way has the diamonds "hooking" the cement upward.

i have it installed in totally random ways - it looks like the horizontal pieces i placed happen to be backwards of this "hook," and i also placed a few pieces vertically lengthwise for less waste.

do i need to rip it all out and start again? does this really matter? will the stucco fall off if i install it as-is?

it's not a huge area but everything is totally riddled with nails. would be a big pain to undo.

thanks.

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Old 07-20-2010, 04:14 PM   #2
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self furring metal lath installation - help


CUPS UP! Page #13: http://www.mnlath-plaster.com/librar...Update2009.pdf

Be safe, Gary

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Old 07-20-2010, 05:26 PM   #3
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self furring metal lath installation - help


thanks GBR.

the stone yard "pro" salesman at my local building supply told me it didn't matter. i couldn't find any info online about it (didn't realize "cups" was the right term).

anyway, i trusted my friend and ripped off the one full sheet and reinstalled cups up.
i do however have a few little pieces that are oriented vertically.

i did the scratch coat today and it stuck like glue, so i'm pretty confident it's not going to "fall off."

i'm surprised that absolutely no one seems to know anything about stucco or lathe. even my mason friend couldn't tell me how to make stucco.

thanks for the response.
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Old 07-20-2010, 06:18 PM   #4
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self furring metal lath installation - help


Glad to help. I knew the answer from a few years ago but like to prove my statements with facts online rather than just an opinion. That one took about 1/2 hour, but it was a good break. Here is another one to glean from: http://books.google.com/books?id=0dz...page&q&f=false

Be safe, Gary
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Old 07-20-2010, 06:37 PM   #5
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self furring metal lath installation - help


thanks again man.
mind if i ask you a few more questions?

1) i've done a lot of reading on this. most sources seemed to say to mix the components (sand, cement, lime, water) until firm yet workable, like able to make a ball in your hand that will retain it's shape.
anyway, my scratch coat went on today. compared to a typical mortar mix, it was wet, but by no means soupy.
i was just watching some videos online and in all of them the stucco being applied was just about a SOUP consistency, like super wet almost like yogurt or something.
i had to exert a bit of force with my wrist to embed this stuff into the metal lath.
i hope i haven't already compromised the job.


2) many sources say all that's needed is a scratch coat and a final coat.
many others insist on three.
which should i do?

i want to do a spanish lace/skip trowel finish.

i am planning on waiting until friday (2 1/2 days of curing, while periodically misting with water) until doing the next coat, but i'm not sure if i can do the final coat then, or need to do a "brown" coat, wait another 48 hours, and then final?

what kind of consistency should i aim for in subsequent coats?

thanks again.

edit:
am definitely worried about the consistency that i mixed the scratch coat to.
it was basically a semi stiff wet mound on my hawk.
i realize now it should have been more like stiff pancake batter?

all these terms like "stiff paste" and "frosting" and "putty" are so vague and difficult to interpret properly.

will i be OK with what i put on there?

it's about 50 square feet, so i'd rather rip it all out now and start over than risk having it all fall apart in like two weeks.

second edit:
just watched this video:
my consistency was about the same, maybe a little dryer. so i feel much better.

Last edited by wombosi; 07-20-2010 at 07:29 PM.
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