DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Building & Construction (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/)
-   -   Security...all screws created equal? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f19/security-all-screws-created-equal-83132/)

bergerdude 10-05-2010 02:28 PM

Security...all screws created equal?
 
Hi,
Due to an increase in burglaries in my neighborhood I did some searching and saw that someone recommended replacing the screws around the strike plate in the door jam (I hope the terminology is close enough) with longer ones so as to enter the door frame.

Mine are currently an inch, it looks like I can do a 2 inch without messing with the side panel windows.

1)So the actual question is...if I use a coarse DRYWALL screw is that ok?
I know they aren't stressed for cabinets, etc....so how would they fair to someone trying to kick in the door?

2)I also read that to prevent a sliding door from being lifter off the track (newer door) one can drill into part of the track into the door and insert a pin (probably a small nail in my case.
IS there any seal I can damage on the door itself?

The track is a molded plastic as is the perimeter of the sliding door.

Thanks for all suggestions...

retired guy 60 10-05-2010 04:17 PM

With regard to your first question, I have found drywall screws to be brittle. They will snap off easily if used as you propose and the door is forcefully hit. Even deck screws would be an improvement over drywall screws. There may even be something stronger. Check with your local home center or a real hardware store, if you can find one that has not been driven out of business by the big box stores.

eastside 10-05-2010 07:02 PM

I was at a garage sale and picked up some stainless steel screws. I was surprised they bend like a nail. I'd imagine they would be good to use for the strike plate. They would hold well, and bend when force is applied. The box stores have ss screws.

I wouldn't use a s/r screw, they snap.

As far as the patio door, don't know but if you're drilling plastic not much holding power, better ask around.

Ron6519 10-05-2010 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bergerdude (Post 511933)
Hi,
Due to an increase in burglaries in my neighborhood I did some searching and saw that someone recommended replacing the screws around the strike plate in the door jam (I hope the terminology is close enough) with longer ones so as to enter the door frame.

Mine are currently an inch, it looks like I can do a 2 inch without messing with the side panel windows.

1)So the actual question is...if I use a coarse DRYWALL screw is that ok?
I know they aren't stressed for cabinets, etc....so how would they fair to someone trying to kick in the door?

2)I also read that to prevent a sliding door from being lifter off the track (newer door) one can drill into part of the track into the door and insert a pin (probably a small nail in my case.
IS there any seal I can damage on the door itself?

The track is a molded plastic as is the perimeter of the sliding door.

Thanks for all suggestions...

Contact your local police dept. Many dept's will come to the house and advise you of weak points in your house.
Personally, I would go into your backyard and pry open a window.
Ron

cbzdel 10-06-2010 02:42 PM

When you said this:

"it looks like I can do a 2 inch without messing with the side panel windows"

I instantly thought, whats the point, sounds like you have door sidelights.. If you were a burgler and wanted to get into a house, if you kicked the door and it didnt budge, and you really wanted it, you break the side light and reach in and unlock the door.

retired guy 60 10-06-2010 03:06 PM

To solve your sliding door dilemma, I'd suggest a low tech method of taking a piece of hardwood about the size of a furring stip and cutting it so that when laid down horizontally over the bottom track the slider can't budge. No need to drill a hole and this method is tried and true.
Don't assume that stainless steel screws are better than other fasteners as one poster noted. I bought some stainless steel deck screws from Home Depot that were impossible to use as the heads quickly stripped when I tried to drive them into PT lumber. They were imported and the stainless steel may have been low quality.

bergerdude 10-06-2010 10:40 PM

Thanks for the responses.
We do have those small windows on the sides of the doors. I don't know why builders continue to do this stuff....pretty dumb.
Our old home had them but I was able to change out a keyed (both sides) lock to prevent simply breaking and turning the latch.
This home I have not found a good substitute, have instead just gone for a simple interior slide latch that would be difficult for Stretch-R-Strong to reach.

All our horizontal doors and windows have 1/2" PVC (white goes with the cookie cutter builder home) to serve as the "broom handle" in the slider.

Can Sliding glass doors move more than 1/2" in the track? This is what I am unsure of?

Our vertical lift windows only have the integrated lock...I could friction fit more 1/2" pvc wedgy bar vertically....but I'm not sure how great that would be. Any ideas?

Of course if someone wants in they can throw the patio furniture through the window...until the motion picks them up.
I removed a screw out of the catch plate and it is an inch....not ideal, but at least it wasn't a 1/2" decorative screw.

Thanks again...

jlhaslip 10-07-2010 08:49 AM

According to the Building Code in my area, any window within 36 inches of a door needs to be Tempered/Safety glass.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:25 AM.