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Dorado 04-27-2013 01:44 PM

Screwing steel studs the hard way
 
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I'm extending a closet and this is my first time working with steel studs and drywall. I never saw this done before, but I think I'll screw in the studs from the inside of the frame so the drywall will be flush against the studs instead of on the screw heads. Do all of you guys have ratchets or stubby screwdrivers so you'd be able to unscrew something like this if you had to?

funfool 04-27-2013 02:01 PM

From what I see, looks like you have the correct steel stud screws. They have a really small head and if you went from the other direction like you propose, they would stick out further then going the correct way.

I have worked union carpenter from time to time, is all commercial and metal studs, I prefer residential.
But no, you screw from the outside and not from the inside, unless that is the only way you can get to it, and then you usually need to add a extension which you would carry with you in your tool belt for that purpose. But is not preferred.

The sheet rock will lay flat on the heads of the screws and you will not notice.

garywade78 04-27-2013 04:04 PM

You take the self tapping framing screw out before you hang drywall.

funfool 04-27-2013 04:38 PM

You take the self tapping framing screw out before you hang drywall.

You mean after they are welded? :eek:
I never heard of such a thing as screwing together the framing and then removing the screws later.
I assure you is not how it is done in the real world.
And even if welding is required but would not be on a interior closet, the screws would not be removed.

garywade78 04-27-2013 06:28 PM

In union commercial construction I have seen the pan head removed prior to hanging board. I've seen the screws pop before, especially around door frames. Not to say its done everywhere. But there is no need for that screw once you start hanging drywall.
You would never weld metal framing together to build a wall.

funfool 04-27-2013 06:53 PM

That is interesting.
I have never seen a screw removed before. It would be totally stupid to spend time removing a screw.
Sorry, I just do not know a better way to explain.

Dorado 04-27-2013 07:18 PM

I'd leave the screw in anyway because I need as much support as I could get since the patio brick under the frame won't be attached to the subfloor. The two studs that are against the wall will be screwed flush against the wall and will help prevent the brick from moving once they're screwed to the tracks. The brackets you can see in my photo do a good job holding the brick but I don't want to take a chance that a carpet stretcher guy will kick my wall out of place. I'm not penetrating the floor because it's covered with brittle asbestos tile that I don't want to mess with.

woodworkbykirk 04-27-2013 08:35 PM

the only time you will notice the screw heads effecting the drywall by causing it to bulge is at rough openings such as doors.. the bulge can throw off door jambs being flush with the drywall and since the drywall will bulge at the header you need to fuss over mitres in trim more as well as the casing wont lay flat now.

TheEplumber 04-27-2013 08:46 PM

Though I'm not a frammer, I have been on multiple steel stud projects that involved light gauge as well as heavy gauge steel framed walls and ceilings. I have seen heavy gauge welded in certain conditions but I have never seen screws removed except on temporary tacked studs.
Screw from the outside- you won't notice the head when you're done. Also- invest in some C-clamp vise grips to help hold your material in position while framing :thumbsup:

RWolff 04-27-2013 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by funfool (Post 1168385)
That is interesting.
I have never seen a screw removed before. It would be totally stupid to spend time removing a screw.
Sorry, I just do not know a better way to explain.


Seems stupid to me too, putting the screws in temporarily and then taking them back out later, they sure can't hurt being left in.

Msradell 04-28-2013 04:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by garywade78 (Post 1168381)
In union commercial construction I have seen the pan head removed prior to hanging board. I've seen the screws pop before, especially around door frames. Not to say its done everywhere. But there is no need for that screw once you start hanging drywall.
You would never weld metal framing together to build a wall.

You Don't say in your title where you are located, but I've never seen any thing like this done before. You put a screw into metal studs, you leave it! Unless it's something local unions have done to create more works themselves, it's totally waste of time.

TheEplumber 04-28-2013 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Msradell (Post 1168904)
You Don't say in your title where you are located, but I've never seen any thing like this done before. You put a screw into metal studs, you leave it! Unless it's something local unions have done to create more works themselves, it's totally waste of time.

The only time I have seen screws removed is when the top plate needs to deflect- the top plate is also extra deep and the studs are intentionally left short in length. Also, the drywall is not screwed to the top plate

garywade78 04-28-2013 06:07 PM

Did I say every last one? He asked about screwing the stud from the back toward the front which the screw would puncture the drywall. Just simply said take it out. Sorry I wasn't clearer. Top of the stud the screw gets removed before you hang drywall. Your top track is deep leg track, stud you always cut it shorter for deflection. Anything else you like to know? Since you have absolutely know idea about metal framing. Go to Dietrich.com you can learn a lot about metal framing. Then you can talk with sense.

Dorado 04-28-2013 06:58 PM

I was going to screw only one leg of the track and stud so the screw wouldn't go through the drywall. I read a few different opinions on whether to screw in both legs. I think when only one side is screwed, the other side should be drywalled, so if I screwed and drywalled the front, an additional screw in the back would be a good idea, though I read it's not required by code. I'll probably screw both sides. The 1/8" high pan screw head will actually save me some joint compound.

kwikfishron 04-28-2013 07:09 PM

And...why didn't you do this in wood? Just curious.


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