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Old 12-23-2011, 10:28 PM   #31
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Sagging beam replacement


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Originally Posted by BigGuy01 View Post
With all due respect, that development should not exist at all right now. It has no support. By "waiting to collapse" what I mean by that, is its sagging because of the weight. Without proper support for that weight, it will collapse. As you add weight onto it, and as it naturally ages, integrity gradually fails.

I can't even believe that development on that second floor exists if that drawing is accurate.

By support beam, I mean there should be a reinforced support beam in the center mass of where the weight is located, pushing it up that 2'' so its level, and weight is supported.

YOu need to reinforce that floor, or that floor will come down eventually. ONe of those joists will eventually give, and it will fall in. Maybe not in the next day, or week, but eventually it will collapse. It has no support, and should have never been constructed the way it is.

On a commcercial building, that garage would have been shut down, and you'd have entire crews rushing to get that floor reinforced, supported, etc.

The support beam(s) should be placed towards the center of gravity for the weight being distributed. You could divide the weight between two support beams, but if there isn't enough room you could possibly go with one. However, Per code, you're required to have so many support beams for such much sq ft and lbs per sq ft.

You really should have an engineer or architect look over it. And then have a PROFESSIONAL Building Contractor construct the proper design per blue prints.

But that scares the crap out of me. (the fact they have so much weight concentrated on a spot like that) Just so you know, a 1'' sag on a commercial building, can have the entire permit for vacancy stripped from a building, and an entire building shut down. Even a sky scraper, to as small as a Fire Department building. Unless that sag was support via proper supports and the floor was deemed reinforced for it.

A big problem you'll have in putting sister joists in, or one joist each side, is the "sag" creates and "arch" if you will. (a bad kind of arch) So a contractor may need to jack up the floor, or take the floor apart and put it back together to put reinforcements into it.
Thanks, I absolutely understand what you are saying. I was confused when you said "garage floor," so I just wanted to make sure there wasn't something I was overlooking with respect to the slab or foundation.

We will be jacking up the upstairs floor, so I'm sure we will also have to replace the subfloor, etc. Clearly the sag will have to be corrected before the new joists are installed. I know that can be tricky.

I do have an engineer, so we should at least be able to know for sure that what we are doing will solve the problem.

I will post exactly what I am doing, when we get ready to do it. Maybe even provide some pics.

Again, thanks for your reply. I know it takes a while to write all this stuff out.

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Old 12-24-2011, 12:27 AM   #32
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Sagging beam replacement


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Thanks, I absolutely understand what you are saying. I was confused when you said "garage floor," so I just wanted to make sure there wasn't something I was overlooking with respect to the slab or foundation.

We will be jacking up the upstairs floor, so I'm sure we will also have to replace the subfloor, etc. Clearly the sag will have to be corrected before the new joists are installed. I know that can be tricky.

I do have an engineer, so we should at least be able to know for sure that what we are doing will solve the problem.

I will post exactly what I am doing, when we get ready to do it. Maybe even provide some pics.

Again, thanks for your reply. I know it takes a while to write all this stuff out.
It's all good, in actuality, it doesn't even take me two minutes to write out all I wrote out. I have a 110 WPM with my typing, because Maintenance Personelle have to be proficient with the operation of computers, which requires at least a compitent level of proficiency typing.

But that said, I would really like to see how it goes. And I really hope precautions are taken when things are taken apart (if at all) and how things get reassembled.

Check the Preventive Maintence thread I made, and go over other parts of your home, find any small things to be fixed while you wait on this larger problem. Since you can't really do anything until blueprints are drawn up, materials listed, and an overall game plan is devised, I'd put this on the backburner for now and do some PMs on your home.

Like flushing your water heater, etc. etc. etc. That way, you don't get blind sided by one problem, and miss out several other potential problems you are unaware of. Since it is a home you inherited, it would be very much worth checking the rest of the home out.
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Old 12-24-2011, 01:42 AM   #33
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Man, you have me really confused, you have an engineer on board so presumably you will pay him for a solution yet you seem to be asking for solutions here on this forum?
Do you see why I might be wondering what is going on?
I trust I am not offending anyone here.
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Old 12-24-2011, 11:55 AM   #34
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Sagging beam replacement


I am not going to take any one person's advice as gospel. Just because my engineer says one thing doesn't mean it's the only way. Like I mentioned before, on a different project, I had one engineer tell me I needed 40 interior piers. The next engineer discovered that I didn't need any, because I had a slab that was unevenly poured. It saved me $20K to get a second opinion.

On still another project, an engineer told me the North side of my house needed piers. When the piering company came out, they determined it was actually the South side of the house that needed piers. Go figure.

I have more examples if you like.

I do trust my engineer, but if he tells me I need to put a post in the middle of my garage, do you think that is the only solution?
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Old 12-24-2011, 11:59 AM   #35
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"I do trust my engineer, but if he tells me I need to put a post in the middle of my garage, do you think that is the only solution?"

No.
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Old 12-24-2011, 12:07 PM   #36
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I know that that would be only one of perhaps many different possible solutions.

Why not just ask the engineer for another solution? I consult with engineers all the time if I can not do a prescriptive design myself, or if the Building Department will not allow a prescriptive solution.

Most of the engineers I deal with try to come up with what is known as "value engineered solutions", meaning that the solution is in keeping with the needs of the home owners or clients budget and capabilities.

I think yours should do the same thing rather than asking for what amounts to uninformed internet opinions.

Just trying to be helpful and understand the situation.

Andy.

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